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Academic skills in children with early-onset type 1 diabetes: the effects of diabetes-related risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124345
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):457-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Riitta Hannonen
Jorma Komulainen
Raili Riikonen
Timo Ahonen
Kenneth Eklund
Asko Tolvanen
Päivi Keskinen
Anja Nuuja
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Neurology, Kymenlaakso Central Hospital, Carea, Kotkantie 41, Kotka, Finland. riitta.hannonen@carea.fi
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):457-63
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - therapy
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Educational Measurement
Female
Finland
Hospitals
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis
Learning Disorders - diagnosis
Male
Mathematics
Risk factors
Abstract
The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia,on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).
The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9 y 11 mo,SD 4 mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40 females, 52 males;mean age 9 y 9 mo,SD 3 mo). Children were included if T1DM had been diagnosed before the age of 5 years and if they were aged between 9 and 10 years at the time of study. Children were not included if their native language was not Finnish and if they had a diagnosed neurological disorder that affected their cognitive development. Among the T1DM group, 37 had and 26 had not experienced severe hypoglycaemia and 26 had avoided severe hypoglycaemia. Severe hypoglycaemia, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA), and glycaemic control were used as T1DM-related factors. Task performance in reading, spelling, and mathematics was compared among the three groups, and the effects of the T1DM-related factors were analysed with general linear models.
The groups with (p
Notes
Comment In: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):393-422590722
PubMed ID
22590723 View in PubMed
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[Access to the early diagnosis of dementia in New Brunswick: perceptions of potential users of services depending on the language and the middle of life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105864
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sarah Pakzad
Jalila Jbilou
Marie-Claire Paulin
Véronique Fontaine
Denise Donovan
Mathieu Bélanger
Paul-Émile Bourque
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. sarah.pakzad@umoncton.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Date
2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dementia - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Language
Male
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
New Brunswick
Patient satisfaction
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The early diagnosis of dementia (EDD) enables the identification of reversible causes of dementia and allows the timely implementation of secondary preventive and therapeutic interventions. This study explores New Brunswick seniors' perceptions of the accessibility and availability of EDD services as well as their satisfaction with them while taking into account their language of use and place of residence (urban or rural).
Self-administered survey exploring perceptions of EDD services in Francophone and Anglophone seniors from rural and urban areas of New Brunswick. Univariate and bivariate analyses were carried out.
Of the 157 participants aged 65 years and over who filled out the survey and whose data were analyzed, 84 identified as Francophone, 72 of whom lived in rural areas. Bivariate analyses showed that linguistic groups were comparable with regard to their perceptions of the availability, access to, and satisfaction with EDD services. However, when taking the geographic dimension into account, linguistic intergroup and intragroup disparities were observed, notably in the areas pertaining to the type of services available in the area.
These results suggest that seniors who live in rural areas of New Brunswick are a particularly vulnerable group with perceived limited access to EDD services in their area.
PubMed ID
24300314 View in PubMed
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Acetabular dysplasia at the age of 1 year in children with neonatal instability of the hip.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106433
Source
Acta Orthop. 2013 Oct;84(5):483-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Daniel Wenger
Henrik Düppe
Carl-Johan Tiderius
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics , Malmö, Skåne University Hospital , Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop. 2013 Oct;84(5):483-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - abnormalities
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Early Diagnosis
Female
Hip Dislocation, Congenital - diagnosis - radiography - surgery
Humans
Infant
Joint Instability - congenital - prevention & control - surgery
Male
Observer Variation
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
As much as one-third of all total hip arthroplasties in patients younger than 60 years may be a consequence of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Screening and early treatment of neonatal instability of the hip (NIH) reduces the incidence of DDH. We examined the radiographic outcome at 1 year in children undergoing early treatment for NIH.
All children born in Malm? undergo neonatal screening for NIH, and any child with suspicion of instability is referred to our clinic. We reviewed the 1-year radiographs for infants who were referred from April 2002 through December 2007. Measurements of the acetabular index at 1 year were compared between neonatally dislocated, unstable, and stable hips.
The incidence of NIH was 7 per 1,000 live births. The referral rate was 15 per 1,000. 82% of those treated were girls. The mean acetabular index was higher in dislocated hips (25.3, 95% CI: 24.6-26.0) than in neonatally stable hips (22.7, 95% CI: 22.3-23.2). Girls had a higher mean acetabular index than boys and left hips had a higher mean acetabular index than right hips, which is in accordance with previous findings.
Even in children who are diagnosed and treated perinatally, radiographic differences in acetabular shape remain at 1 year. To determine whether this is of clinical importance, longer follow-up will be required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24171679 View in PubMed
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Acute heart failure: lessons learned so far.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134305
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):284-95
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jonathan G Howlett
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiac Sciences, University of Calgary, and Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. jonathan.howlett@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):284-95
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Early Diagnosis
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Vasodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Abstract
Acute heart failure (AHF) affects nearly every Canadian with heart failure (HF) at least once. Despite several attempts, no medical therapies have been shown to improve the natural history of AHF. In addition, the place of diagnosis of AHF is increasingly made in the outpatient setting. In this view, AHF is a moving target, and from recent registry data and from clinical trials, 5 critical lessons regarding the syndrome of AHF emerge: (1) The period of clinical instability preceding AHF may be much longer than previously thought. (2) Refinement of tools used to aid the early and accurate diagnosis of AHF will impact patient outcomes. (3) Standard supportive care of patients with AHF includes early use of diuretics with frequent reassessment in nearly all patients and supplemental vasodilators and oxygen therapy in selected cases. (4) Patients who survive presentation of AHF continue to suffer high rates of re-presentation, death, and rehospitalization following discharge from either hospital or emergency department. (5) Interventions shown to improve patient outcomes for AHF to date are related to process of care rather than new medications or devices. This report reviews the recent literature regarding the presentation, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of AHF. Areas of future research priority are indicated and guidelines for improving treatment are provided. AHF is an important clinical area that has not been as intensively studied as chronic HF; it presents both important needs and exciting opportunities for research and innovation.
PubMed ID
21601768 View in PubMed
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Adult bacterial meningitis-a quality registry study: earlier treatment and favourable outcome if initial management by infectious diseases physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275099
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015 Jun;21(6):560-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Ö. Grindborg
P. Naucler
J. Sjölin
M. Glimåker
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015 Jun;21(6):560-6
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Case Management
Early Diagnosis
Female
Hearing Loss - epidemiology
Humans
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Meningitis, Bacterial - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Middle Aged
Physicians
Retrospective Studies
Secondary Prevention
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is challenging for the admitting physician because it is a rare but fulminant disease, usually presenting without typical symptoms, and rapid treatment is pivotal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of initial management by infectious diseases (ID) physicians vs. non-ID physicians. A total of 520 consecutive adults (>17 years old), 110 with initial ID management and 410 with non-ID management, registered in the Swedish quality registry for community-acquired ABM January 2008 to December 2013, were analysed retrospectively. Primary outcome was appropriate treatment with antibiotics and corticosteroids
PubMed ID
25752223 View in PubMed
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Adult primary immune deficiency: what are we missing?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123610
Source
Am J Med. 2012 Aug;125(8):779-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Bharat T Srinivasa
Reza Alizadehfar
Martin Desrosiers
Joseph Shuster
Nitika Pant Pai
Christos M Tsoukas
Author Affiliation
Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Med. 2012 Aug;125(8):779-86
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Early Diagnosis
Female
Humans
Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Quebec
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
More than 200 primary immune deficiencies have been described. In adults, their identification can be difficult. The lack of timely referrals, diagnostic facilities, and available expertise often delay appropriate treatment. Because an increasing number of adults are now diagnosed with immune deficiencies, there is a need to better understand the immune deficits in this age group. The study objective was to analyze the diagnostic spectrum of adults with primary immune deficiency and to determine the presumptive diagnostic accuracy of the referring physicians.
We conducted a retrospective chart review over a 10-year period of all individuals referred to a dedicated center for adults with primary immune deficiency. Suspected cases were confirmed using standard clinical criteria and state of the art immune assays.
Of the 381 individuals studied, 244 were diagnosed as immune deficient. Of these, 210 had primary immune deficiency classified as novel, defined, and undefined. Forty-three patients had a prior diagnosis and were referred for follow-up care, and 201 patients were newly diagnosed. Most patients had common variable immune deficiency. Despite an apparent high index of suspicion in initiating the referrals, only one third of these patients had a prior quantitative assessment of serum immunoglobulins.
In this first known analysis of a large cohort of adults with suspected immune deficiency using established diagnostic criteria, we confirmed the diagnosis in two thirds of all patients. Our findings highlight the wide spectrum of primary immune deficiency states seen in adult medical practices and the need for increased awareness of their existence.
PubMed ID
22682795 View in PubMed
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Age at cryptorchidism diagnosis and orchiopexy in Denmark: a population based study of 508,964 boys born from 1995 to 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131990
Source
J Urol. 2011 Oct;186(4 Suppl):1595-600
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Morten Søndergaard Jensen
Lars Henning Olsen
Ane Marie Thulstrup
Jens Peter Bonde
Jørn Olsen
Tine Brink Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Research Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. morten@sondergaard-jensen.dk
Source
J Urol. 2011 Oct;186(4 Suppl):1595-600
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptorchidism - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Diagnosis
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Orchiopexy - methods
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Early treatment for cryptorchidism may be necessary to preserve fertility. International guidelines now recommend that congenital cryptorchidism be treated with orchiopexy before age 1 year. Acquired cryptorchidism should be treated at presentation. To our knowledge the rate of adherence to these guidelines in recent years is unknown. Thus, we present data on age at cryptorchidism diagnosis and orchiopexy in recent Danish birth cohorts.
A population of 508,964 Danish boys born alive from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2009 was identified using the Danish Civil Registration System. Five birth cohorts were defined, including 1995 to 1997, 1998 to 2000, 2001 to 2003, 2004 to 2006 and 2007 to 2009. The boys were followed in the Danish National Patient Registry for a diagnosis of cryptorchidism and for an orchiopexy procedure. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier estimator and Cox regression models.
During followup 10,094 boys were diagnosed with cryptorchidism, of whom 5,473 underwent orchiopexy. Mean age at diagnosis in boys followed at least 6 years was 3.3 years (95% CI 3.3-3.4) in the 1995 to 1997 cohort, 3.1 (95% CI 3.1-3.2) in the 1998 to 2000 cohort and 2.9 (95% CI 2.8-2.9) in the 2001 to 2003 cohort while mean age at orchiopexy was 3.8 (3.7-3.9), 3.6 (3.5-3.7) and 3.3 years (3.2-3.4), respectively.
In the more recent birth cohorts of 1995 to 2009 we observed a shift toward younger age at cryptorchidism diagnosis and orchiopexy.
PubMed ID
21855929 View in PubMed
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396 records – page 1 of 40.