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First report of spinose ear tick, Otobius megnini (Acari, Argasidae), in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289472
Source
Exp Appl Acarol. 2017 Jun; 72(2):179-181
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Anders Lindström
Johanna Lindström
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Ulls väg 2B, 751 89, Uppsala, Sweden. anders.lindstrom@sva.se.
Source
Exp Appl Acarol. 2017 Jun; 72(2):179-181
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Argasidae - growth & development
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dogs
Ear - parasitology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A dog that had travelled to Sweden was inspected by a veterinarian. In one ear canal a tick was found. It was later identified as a spinose ear tick, Otobius megnini. In this case report we also review the previously known reports of O. megnini in Europe and the recent introduction and spread in Turkey.
Notes
Cites: Exp Appl Acarol. 2012 May;57(1):91-104 PMID 22371208
Cites: Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2014 Mar;5(2):213-8 PMID 24355764
Cites: Turkiye Parazitol Derg. 2016 Sep;40(3):152-157 PMID 27905285
Cites: J Med Entomol. 1994 Mar;31(2):240-56 PMID 8189415
PubMed ID
28573423 View in PubMed
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First report of spinose ear tick, Otobius megnini (Acari, Argasidae), in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289630
Source
Exp Appl Acarol. 2017 Jun; 72(2):179-181
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Anders Lindström
Johanna Lindström
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Ulls väg 2B, 751 89, Uppsala, Sweden. anders.lindstrom@sva.se.
Source
Exp Appl Acarol. 2017 Jun; 72(2):179-181
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Argasidae - growth & development
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dogs
Ear - parasitology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A dog that had travelled to Sweden was inspected by a veterinarian. In one ear canal a tick was found. It was later identified as a spinose ear tick, Otobius megnini. In this case report we also review the previously known reports of O. megnini in Europe and the recent introduction and spread in Turkey.
Notes
Cites: Exp Appl Acarol. 2012 May;57(1):91-104 PMID 22371208
Cites: Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2014 Mar;5(2):213-8 PMID 24355764
Cites: Turkiye Parazitol Derg. 2016 Sep;40(3):152-157 PMID 27905285
Cites: J Med Entomol. 1994 Mar;31(2):240-56 PMID 8189415
PubMed ID
28573423 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ixodes ricinus infestation in free-ranging cervids in Norway--a study based upon ear examinations of hunted animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261490
Source
Vet Parasitol. 2013 Jul 1;195(1-2):142-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2013
Author
Kjell Handeland
Lars Qviller
Turid Vikøren
Hildegunn Viljugrein
Atle Lillehaug
Rebecca K Davidson
Source
Vet Parasitol. 2013 Jul 1;195(1-2):142-9
Date
Jul-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Cattle
Deer - parasitology
Ear - parasitology
Humans
Ixodes - physiology
Larva
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nymph
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Tick Infestations - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Zoonoses
Abstract
Prevalence, abundance and instar composition of Ixodes ricinus as found on one ear collected from 1019 moose (Alces alces), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), shot during hunting (August-December) 2001-2003, are reported. The animals originated from 15 coastal municipalities (CM), seven municipalities bordering to coastal municipalities (BCM) and four inland municipalities (IM), in Norway, between latitudes 58-66° N. I. ricinus occurred endemically in all CM and BCM up to 63°30' N, whereas it was non-endemic further north and in the IM. This geographical distribution of the tick along the coast of southern Norway was largely in accordance with that reported as far back as the 1940s. Our results therefore did not indicate any large scale northwards expansion of I. ricinus in Norway during the 60 year-period between the two studies. However, the prevalence of infestation and tick abundance were significantly higher in CM as compared to BCM. The prevalence and abundance by month were highest during August and September, gradually decreasing towards December. The considerable prevalence of ticks in November, as well as findings in December, would seem to indicate a prolonged tick season as compared with the studies carried out 60 years ago. A total of 8920 ticks were isolated from 439 of the 603 animals examined in endemic municipalities, and the maximum number of ticks found on one single ear was 204. Attached adult ticks were primarily found among the long hairs at base of the ear, whereas nymphs and larvae were seen all over the outer surface of the pinna, for larvae especially at the edge and tip of the ear. Nymphs were the dominant instar, constituting 74% of the total tick count. The proportion of larvae and adult ticks was 13% and 12%. A significantly higher proportion of adult ticks and lower proportion of immature stages were found in moose, as compared to red deer and roe deer. The same apparently size-associated preference of adult ticks was also found for adult animals (all species) as compared to calves. Other grossly detected ectoparasites included the lice Solenopotes burmeisteri in red deer and Damalinia meyeri in roe deer, and the deer ked fly, Lipoptena cervi, in moose and roe deer. This is believed to be the first systematic study on the instar composition by I. ricinus infestation in free-ranging cervids. The examination of ears from hunted cervids should be recognized as a rational way of obtaining data on the geographical distribution and abundance of this tick in nature.
PubMed ID
23541678 View in PubMed
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