Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

A 3-year follow-up after anterior colporrhaphy compared with collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272920
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Rudnicki
E. Laurikainen
R. Pogosean
I. Kinne
U. Jakobsson
P. Teleman
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Collagen
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - epidemiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Surgical Mesh
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To compare the 1-year (previously published) and 3-year objective and subjective cure rates, and complications, related to the use of a collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse against a conventional anterior repair.
Randomised controlled study.
Six departments of obstetrics and gynaecology in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark.
A total of 138 women, of 55 years of age or older, admitted for stage =2 anterior vaginal wall prolapse.
The women scheduled for primary anterior vaginal wall prolapse surgery were randomised between conventional anterior colporrhaphy and surgery with a collagen-coated prolene mesh. All patients were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) assessment before and after surgery. Symptoms related to pelvic organ prolapse were evaluated using the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7) and the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20).
Objective cure, defined as POP-Q stage
PubMed ID
26420345 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term outcome after obstetric injury: a retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126044
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jun;91(6):715-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jan-Christer Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Falu Hospital, Falun, Sweden. janchrister.sundquist@ltdalarna.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jun;91(6):715-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Case-Control Studies
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology
Fecal Incontinence - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Flatulence - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Perineum - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - adverse effects
Abstract
To examine problems experienced by women after vaginal delivery with and without a sphincter tear and compare those with less and more severe injuries.
Retrospective questionnaire study. Setting. Regional hospital in Sweden.
A total of 324 women with and 309 without sphincter tears.
Questionnaires were sent out four to eight years after delivery enquiring about the existence and time course of gas incontinence, fecal incontinence, dyspareunia and perineal pain. A question about vacuum delivery was also included.
Prevalence of persisting symptoms.
The reply rate was 77%. About 10% of the women with a sphincter tear had fecal incontinence initially, compared with 3% among those without a sphincter tear. In women with moderate or severe tears, 20 and 31%, respectively, had gas incontinence, compared with 6% of women without a tear. Dyspareunia and perineal pain were present 18-23% of women in the tear groups compared with 9-12% of those without a tear. Almost 45% of women with initial symptoms had remaining problems after four to eight years. There was a significantly higher risk for symptoms after vacuum extraction (p
PubMed ID
22428951 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of Pain Symptoms Suggestive of Endometriosis Among Finnish Adolescent Girls (TEENMAPS Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277078
Source
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2016 Apr;29(2):97-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
P A Suvitie
M K Hallamaa
J M Matomäki
J I Mäkinen
A H Perheentupa
Source
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2016 Apr;29(2):97-103
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Constipation - epidemiology - etiology
Contraceptives, Oral - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dysmenorrhea - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology
Dysuria - epidemiology - etiology
Endometriosis - complications - pathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Pain Measurement - methods
Prevalence
Schools
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the prevalence of pain symptoms suggestive of endometriosis among adolescent girls aged 15-19 years.
Cross-sectional study.
University hospital.
Adolescent girls aged 15-19 years attending elementary school, high school, or vocational institute at 3 cities in Southwest Finland in 2010-2011.
The school nurses distributed a detailed questionnaire to 2582 girls who were attending school at the time of the study. Completion of the questionnaire was voluntary and anonymous.
Prevalence and severity of dysmenorrhea, acyclic abdominal pain, dyspareunia, dyschezia, and dysuria. Severity was evaluated with an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS).
A total of 1103 eligible answers were analyzed. The prevalence of dysmenorrhea was 68% (738/1092) with mean NRS of 7.0 (SD = 2.0). Acyclic abdominal pain, dyspareunia, dyschezia, and dysuria were less frequent (19% [207/1085], 12% [53/458], 8% [87/1088] and 5% [50/1084], respectively). The prevalence of severe dysmenorrhea (NRS 8-10) was 33% (355/1089). Severe dysmenorrhea was associated with increased risk of concurrent acyclic abdominal pain (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6), dyschezia (OR = 2.5; 95% CI, 1.6-3.9), and regular absenteeism from school or hobbies (OR = 10.0; 95% CI, 4.2-23.6). Using different criteria, 2%-10% (21-106/1103) of all girls could be identified as having symptoms suggestive of endometriosis. Five percent of girls (n = 53/1103) had severe dysmenorrhea, used oral contraceptive pills, and reported inadequate relief from pain medication.
One-third (355/1089) of 15- to 19-year-old girls had severe menstrual pain and 14% (49/355) of them were regularly absent from school or hobbies. Five percent of all teenage girls (53/1103) were poor responders to conventional therapy for primary dysmenorrhea.
PubMed ID
26169662 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reproduction and mode of delivery in women with vaginismus or localised provoked vestibulodynia: a Swedish register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263013
Source
BJOG. 2015 Feb;122(3):329-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
L. Möller
A. Josefsson
M. Bladh
C. Lilliecreutz
G. Sydsjö
Source
BJOG. 2015 Feb;122(3):329-34
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Marital status
Maternal Age
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Parity
Perineum - injuries
Pregnancy
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaginismus - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Vulvodynia - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
To compare sociodemographics, parity and mode of delivery between women diagnosed with vaginismus or localised provoked vestibulodynia (LPV) to women without a diagnosis before first pregnancy.
Retrospective, population-based register study.
Sweden.
All women born in Sweden 1973-83 who gave birth for the first time or remained nulliparous during the years 2001-09.
Nationally linked registries were used to identify the study population. Women diagnosed with vaginismus or LPV were compared to all other women. Odds ratios for parity and mode of delivery were calculated using multinominal regression analysis and logistic regression.
Parity and mode of delivery.
Women with vaginismus/LPV were more likely to be unmarried (P = 0.001), unemployed (P = 0.012), have a higher educational level (P
Notes
Comment In: BJOG. 2015 Feb;122(3):33525088858
PubMed ID
24990073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vaginal changes and sexuality in women with a history of cervical cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21064
Source
N Engl J Med. 1999 May 6;340(18):1383-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-1999
Author
K. Bergmark
E. Avall-Lundqvist
P W Dickman
L. Henningsohn
G. Steineck
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1999 May 6;340(18):1383-9
Date
May-6-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Sexuality
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - radiotherapy - surgery
Vagina - physiology
Vaginal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In women with cervical cancer, treatment causes changes in vaginal anatomy and function. The effect of these changes on sexual function and the extent, if any, to which they distress women are not known. METHODS: In 1996 and 1997, we attempted to contact 332 women with a history of early-stage cervical cancer (age range, 26 to 80 years) who had been treated in 1991 and 1992 at the seven departments of gynecological oncology in Sweden and 489 women without a history of cancer (controls) to ask them to answer an anonymous questionnaire about vaginal changes and sexual function. RESULTS: We received completed questionnaires from 256 of the women with a history of cervical cancer and 350 of the controls. A total of 167 of 247 women with a history of cancer (68 percent) and 236 of 330 controls (72 percent) reported that they had regular vaginal intercourse. Twenty-six percent of the women who had cancer and 11 percent of the controls reported insufficient vaginal lubrication for sexual intercourse, 26 percent of the women who had cancer and 3 percent of the controls reported a short vagina, and 23 percent of the women who had cancer and 4 percent of the controls reported an insufficiently elastic vagina. Twenty-six percent of the women who had cancer reported moderate or much distress due to vaginal changes, as compared with 8 percent of the women in the control group. Dyspareunia was also more common among the women who had cervical cancer. The frequency of orgasms and orgasmic pleasure was similar in the two groups. Among the women who had cervical cancer, the type of treatment received had little if any effect on the prevalence of specific vaginal changes. CONCLUSIONS: Women who have been treated for cervical cancer have persistent vaginal changes that compromise sexual activity and result in considerable distress.
PubMed ID
10228188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Young Swedish women's experience of pain and discomfort during sexual intercourse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90472
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(1):98-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Elmerstig Eva
Wijma Barbro
Swahnberg Katarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Gender and Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Sweden. eva.elmerstig@liu.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(1):98-103
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Coitus
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Pain Measurement
Prevalence
Probability
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study experience and prevalence of (1) pain related to first sexual intercourse; (2) pain and/or discomfort associated with sexual intercourse during the previous month; and (3) associations between these experiences. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: A youth center in southeast Sweden. SAMPLE: Three hundred consecutive women, aged 13-21 (response rate 98%). METHOD: During a two-month period, women consulting a youth center, participated in a questionnaire study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain and/or discomfort during sexual intercourse. RESULTS: The majority of the participants, 98%, had had sexual intercourse and of those, 65% reported pain related to first sexual intercourse. Forty-nine percent (99/203) of those who reported sexual intercourse during the previous month had experienced coital pain and/or discomfort during that period, and for almost every second woman (46/99), those experiences constituted a problem. We found no association between experience of pain during first sexual intercourse and pain and/or discomfort during the previous month. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of pain and/or discomfort associated with sexual intercourse is high among women visiting a youth center. Our results show that coital pain in young women is a problem which needs to be further explored.
PubMed ID
19140047 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.