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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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[A cross-sectional study of lipid metabolism in postmenopausal women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93656
Source
Kardiologiia. 2007;47(6):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Izmozherova N V
Popov A A
Andreev A N
Source
Kardiologiia. 2007;47(6):37-40
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias - blood - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - physiology
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Postmenopause - blood
Prevalence
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
AIM: To assess frequency of atherogenic dyslipidemia in postmenopausal residents of Ekateringurg. METHODS: Cross-sectional study included 1100 female patients of outpatient menopausal clinic. All were residents of Ekaterinburg aged from 28 to 64 years. The participants of the study were divided into 3 groups; the 1st group consisted of women younger than 45 years, the 2nd group included persons aged between 45 and 54 years, in the 3rd group comprized patients aged from 55 to 64 years. RESULTS: Normal lipid metabolism parameters were found in 18% of women. Most frequent dyslipidemias were 2A (44%) and 2B (26%) types. Frequencies of stable angina on exertion, transitory cerebral ischemic attacks, and myocardial infarction increased after the age of 45 years. CONCLUSION: More than 80% of symptomatic postmenopausal women had atherogenic dyslipidemias. The percentage of postmenopausal women who had indication for lipid lowering therapy was high.
PubMed ID
18260873 View in PubMed
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Adult dyslipidemia prediction is improved by repeated measurements in childhood and young adulthood. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268337
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Apr;239(2):350-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Joel Nuotio
Mervi Oikonen
Costan G Magnussen
Jorma S A Viikari
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Antti Jula
Russell Thomson
Matthew A Sabin
Stephen R Daniels
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Apr;239(2):350-7
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atherosclerosis - blood - physiopathology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Dyslipidemias - blood - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Lipids - blood - chemistry
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prediction of adult dyslipidemia has been suggested to improve with multiple measurements in childhood or young adulthood, but there is paucity of specific data from longitudinal studies.
The sample comprised 1912 subjects (54% women) from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who had fasting lipid and lipoprotein measurements collected at three time-points in childhood/young adulthood and had at least one follow-up in later adulthood. Childhood/young adult dyslipidemia was defined as total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) or triglycerides (TG) in the highest quintile, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the lowest quintile. Adult dyslipidemia was defined according to European cut-points (TC > 5.0 mmol/L, LDL-C >3 mmol/L, Non-HDL-C >3.8 mmol/L, HDL-C  1.7 mmol/L). With the exception of triglycerides, Pearson correlation coefficients for predicting adult levels significantly improved when two lipid or lipoprotein measurements in childhood/young adulthood were compared with one measurement (all P 
PubMed ID
25682034 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness is associated with low cardiovascular disease risk: the impact of lifestyle on early risk factors for atherosclerosis in young healthy Swedish individuals - the Lifestyle, Biomarker, and Atherosclerosis study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284719
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2017;13:91-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Maria Fernström
Ulrika Fernberg
Gabriella Eliason
Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2017;13:91-99
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Exercise Test
Feeding Behavior
Hand Strength
Healthy Diet
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Muscle strength
Prevalence
Prognosis
Protective factors
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis is slow and develops over decades. In the cross-sectional Swedish Lifestyle, Biomarker, and Atherosclerosis study, 834 young, self-reported healthy adults aged 18.0-25.9 years have been studied to identify early risk factors for atherosclerosis.
The aims of this study were to 1) assess selected cardiometabolic biomarkers, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) as a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, and lifestyle-related indicators (food habits, handgrip strength, and oxygen uptake, VO2 max); 2) analyze the associations between cIMT and lifestyle factors; and 3) identify subjects at risk of CVD using a risk score and to compare the characteristics of subjects with and without risk of CVD.
Blood samples were taken in a fasting state, and food habits were reported through a questionnaire. cIMT was measured by ultrasound, and VO2 max was measured by ergometer bike test. The risk score was calculated according to Wildman.
cIMT (mean ± standard deviation) was 0.50±0.06 mm, and VO2 max values were 37.8±8.5 and 42.9±9.9 mL/kg/min, in women and men, respectively. No correlation was found between aerobic fitness expressed as VO2 max (mL/kg/min) and cIMT. Using Wildman's definition, 12% of the subjects were classified as being at risk of CVD, and 15% had homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. A total of 35% of women and 25% of men had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than recommended. Food habits did not differ between those at risk and those not at risk. However, aerobic fitness measured as VO2 max (mL/kg/min) differed; 47% of the subjects at risk had low aerobic fitness compared to 23% of the nonrisk subjects (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
28352184 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive treatment, high triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and risk of ischemic heart disease mortality: a 16-year follow-up in the Copenhagen male study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145411
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2010 Jun;8(3):215-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Poul Suadicani
Hans Ole Hein
Finn Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Male Study, Epidemiologic Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg, Denmark. ps11@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2010 Jun;8(3):215-22
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood - complications - mortality
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Incidence
Male
Men's health
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - etiology - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that metabolic syndrome dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality among men taking antihypertensive medication.
This was a 16-year follow up of 2,986 men 53-75 years old without overt cardiovascular disease; 357 men used antihypertensive medicine. Potential risk factors were type of baseline medication, blood pressure, diabetes, fasting serum triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and total cholesterol, glucosuria, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, cancer history, body mass index, alcohol and tobacco use, leisure time physical activity, social class, and age. The main outcome was IHD mortality.
Men treated for hypertension had a two-fold higher cumulative incidence of IHD mortality during the follow up compared to other men (12.0% vs, 5.8%). Dyslipidemia was defined as TG >or=1.70 mmol/L or HDL-C
PubMed ID
20156073 View in PubMed
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Association between different growth curve definitions of overweight and obesity and cardiometabolic risk in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124801
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Jul 10;184(10):E539-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-2012
Author
Lisa Kakinami
Mélanie Henderson
Edgard E Delvin
Emile Levy
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Marie Lambert
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, Que. lisa.kakinami@mcgill.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Jul 10;184(10):E539-50
Date
Jul-10-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias - blood - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Glucose Metabolism Disorders - blood - diagnosis - etiology
Growth Charts
Humans
Hypertension - blood - diagnosis - etiology
Insulin - blood
Lipids - blood
Male
Obesity - blood - complications - diagnosis
Overweight - blood - complications - diagnosis
Quebec
ROC Curve
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
World Health Organization
Abstract
Overweight and obesity in young people are assessed by comparing body mass index (BMI) with a reference population. However, two widely used reference standards, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) growth curves, have different definitions of overweight and obesity, thus affecting estimates of prevalence. We compared the associations between overweight and obesity as defined by each of these curves and the presence of cardiometabolic risk factors.
We obtained data from a population-representative study involving 2466 boys and girls aged 9, 13 and 16 years in Quebec, Canada. We calculated BMI percentiles using the CDC and WHO growth curves and compared their abilities to detect unfavourable levels of fasting lipids, glucose and insulin, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure using receiver operating characteristic curves, sensitivity, specificity and kappa coefficients.
The z scores for BMI using the WHO growth curves were higher than those using the CDC growth curves (0.35-0.43 v. 0.12-0.28, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22546882 View in PubMed
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Association between salivary pH and metabolic syndrome in women: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120895
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2012;12:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Monique Tremblay
Diane Brisson
Daniel Gaudet
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Department of Medicine, ECOGENE-21 Clinical Research Center; Chicoutimi Hospital, 305 St-Vallier Street, Chicoutimi (Québec), Saguenay, Canada.
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2012;12:40
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - physiopathology
Dyslipidemias - blood - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Hyperglycemia - blood - physiopathology
Hypertension - blood - physiopathology
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - blood - physiopathology
Postmenopause - blood - physiology
Premenopause - blood - physiology
Quebec
Saliva - physiology
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The salivary flow rate is an important determinant of salivary pH. It is influenced by several metabolic syndrome (MetS) components as well as the menopausal status. The cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors that characterizes the MetS could be exacerbated following menopause. The objective of this study was therefore to document the association between salivary pH and MetS expression in women according to the menopausal status.
In this cross-sectional study, unstimulated saliva collection was performed on 198 Caucasian women of French-Canadian origin of which 55 were premenopausal women (PMW) and 143 menopausal women (MW). Student's t test, ANOVA and correlation analyses were used to assess the association between salivary pH and MetS components.
The salivary pH level was significantly correlated with several MetS covariates, namely triglycerides (TG), apolipoprotein B (apo B) and plasma glucose concentrations as well as waist circumference and the number of MetS components present in the whole sample and PMW only. Mean pH levels decreased as the number of MetS components increased (p?=?0.004). The correlations between salivary pH and variables associated with MetS components tended to be stronger in PMW. The proportion of the variance (R2) of salivary pH explained by MetS-related variables in PMW, MW and the whole sample was 23.6% (p?=?0.041), 18.1% and 17.0% (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22958748 View in PubMed
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Associations of multiple lipoprotein and apolipoprotein measures with worsening of glycemia and incident type 2 diabetes in 6607 non-diabetic Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269094
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 May;240(1):272-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Maria Fizelova
Manna Miilunpohja
Antti J Kangas
Pasi Soininen
Johanna Kuusisto
Mika Ala-Korpela
Markku Laakso
Alena Stancáková
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 May;240(1):272-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoprotein B-100 - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
We investigated the association of various lipoprotein traits, apolipoproteins and their ratios with the deterioration of glycemia, incident type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and insulin secretion in a large population-based Metabolic Syndrome Men (METSIM) Study.
The METSIM Study includes 10,197 Finnish men, aged 45-73 years, and examined in 2005-2010. From 6607 non-diabetic participants without statin treatment at baseline, 386 developed incident type 2 diabetes during a 5.9-year follow-up. A total of 3330 non-diabetic participants without statin treatment had both baseline and follow-up visit data, and were included in statistical analyses of the worsening of glycemia.
Compared to single lipid and lipoprotein measurements, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein ratios were better predictors of the glucose area under the curve and incident type 2 diabetes after adjustment for confounding factors. The apolipoprotein B/LDL cholesterol ratio was the strongest predictor of the worsening of glycemia, whereas the apolipoprotein A1/HDL cholesterol ratio was the strongest predictor of incident type 2 diabetes. The associations of lipoprotein traits, apolipoproteins and their ratios with insulin sensitivity were stronger than those with insulin secretion.
The apolipoprotein B/LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1/HDL cholesterol ratios were the strongest predictors of the worsening of glycemia and incident type 2 diabetes, respectively.
PubMed ID
25818853 View in PubMed
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Atorvastatin has antithrombotic effects in patients with type 1 diabetes and dyslipidemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142092
Source
Thromb Res. 2010 Sep;126(3):e225-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Sara Tehrani
Fariborz Mobarrez
Aleksandra Antovic
Pia Santesson
Per-Eric Lins
Ulf Adamson
Peter Henriksson
N Håkan Wallén
Gun Jörneskog
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Internal Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. sara.tehrani@ds.se
Source
Thromb Res. 2010 Sep;126(3):e225-31
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Platelets - drug effects - metabolism
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cell-Derived Microparticles - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Over Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - complications
Double-Blind Method
Dyslipidemias - blood - complications - drug therapy
Fibrin - metabolism
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Heptanoic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Integrin beta3 - blood
Middle Aged
P-Selectin - blood
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - blood
Pyrroles - therapeutic use
Sweden
Thrombin - metabolism
Thromboplastin - metabolism
Thrombosis - blood - drug therapy - etiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Diabetes is a prothrombotic state involving a more thrombogenic fibrin network. In the present study we investigated the effects of lipid-lowering therapy with atorvastatin on fibrin network structure and platelet-derived microparticles in patients with type 1 diabetes and dyslipidemia.
Twenty patients were treated with atorvastatin (80 mg daily) or placebo during 2 months in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. Fibrin network permeability, expression of glycoprotein IIIa, P-selectin and tissue factor on platelet-derived microparticles, plasma endogenous thrombin potential, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator antigen levels were assessed. Additionally, levels of plasma fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycated haemoglobin were measured.
During treatment with atorvastatin, fibrin network permeability increased (p=0.01), while endogenous thrombin potential and expression of glycoprotein IIIa, P-selectin and tissue factor decreased (p
PubMed ID
20637495 View in PubMed
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