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2-year clinical outcomes after implantation of sirolimus-eluting, paclitaxel-eluting, and bare-metal coronary stents: results from the WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89935
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2009
Author
Kaltoft Anne
Jensen Lisette Okkels
Maeng Michael
Tilsted Hans Henrik
Thayssen Per
Bøttcher Morten
Lassen Jens Flensted
Krusell Lars Romer
Rasmussen Klaus
Hansen Knud Nørregaard
Pedersen Lars
Johnsen Søren Paaske
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Thuesen Leif
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. annekaltoft@stofanet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Date
Feb-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Paclitaxel
Sirolimus
Stents - adverse effects
Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This registry study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2 types of drug-eluting stents (DES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), compared with bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Drug-eluting stents may increase the risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: A total of 12,395 consecutive patients with coronary intervention and stent implantation recorded in the Western Denmark Heart Registry from January 2002 through June 2005 were followed up for 2 years. Data on death and MI were ascertained from national medical databases. We used Cox regression analysis to control for confounding. RESULTS: The 2-year incidence of definite ST was 0.64% in BMS patients, 0.79% in DES patients (adjusted relative risk [RR]: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 1.65), 0.50% in SES patients (adjusted RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.35 to 1.15), and 1.30% in PES patients (adjusted RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.94). The incidence of MI was 3.8% in BMS-treated patients, 4.5% in DES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.51), 4.1% in SES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.47), and 5.3% in PES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.81). Whereas overall 2-year adjusted mortality was similar in the BMS and the 2 DES stent groups, 12- to 24-month mortality was higher in patients treated with PES (RR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.09). Target lesion revascularization was reduced in both DES groups. CONCLUSIONS: During 2 years of follow-up, patients treated with PES had an increased risk of ST and MI compared with those treated with BMS and SES. Mortality after 12 months was also increased in PES patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):665-619232898
PubMed ID
19232897 View in PubMed
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2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
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A 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcome of everolimus-eluting versus sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in patients with diabetes mellitus (the DiabeDES IV randomized angiography trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275976
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Michael Maeng
Arvydas Baranauskas
Evald Høj Christiansen
Anne Kaltoft
Niels Ramsing Holm
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - mortality - radiography
Coronary Stenosis - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Thrombosis - mortality - radiography
Denmark
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality - radiography - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents
Everolimus - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - radiography
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Risk factors
Sirolimus - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We aimed to compare angiographic and clinical outcomes after the implantation of everolimus-eluting (EES) and sirolimus-eluting (SES) stents in patients with diabetes.
There are limited data on long-term outcome after EES vs SES implantation in diabetic patients.
We randomized 213 patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease to EES (n?=?108) or SES (n?=?105) implantation. Angiographic follow-up was performed 10 months after the index procedure and all patients were followed clinically for 4 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss at 10-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, the need for target lesion revascularization (TLR) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, or TLR) at 4-year follow-up.
At 10-month angiographic follow-up, in-stent late lumen loss was 0.20?±?0.53 mm and 0.11?±?0.49 mm (P?=?0.28), and angiographic restenosis rate was 3.8% and 5.2% (P?=?0.72) in the EES and SES groups, respectively. At 4-year clinical follow-up, MACE had occurred in 22 (20.4%) patients in the EES group and 25 (23.8%) patients in SES group (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.47-1.49; P?=?0.55), with TLR performed in 6 (5.6%) and 10 (9.5%) patients in the two groups (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.21-1-58; P?=?0.28).
EES and SES had comparable 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
PubMed ID
25640050 View in PubMed
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The adverse long-term impact of renal impairment in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the drug-eluting stent era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146521
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug;2(4):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Clare E Appleby
Joan Ivanov
Shahar Lavi
Karen Mackie
Eric M Horlick
Douglas Ing
Christopher B Overgaard
Peter H Seidelin
Rüdiger von Harsdorf
Vladimír Dzavík
Author Affiliation
Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug;2(4):309-16
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - instrumentation
Biological Markers - blood
Chronic Disease
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - complications - mortality - radiography - therapy
Creatinine - blood
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Heart Diseases - etiology - mortality
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
An observational study determining the long-term impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary cardiac referral center. CKD is associated with poor in-hospital outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention, but its effect beyond 1 year, particularly in the drug-eluting stent (DES) era, has not been reported.
Baseline creatinine was available for 11,953 patients entered into a prospective registry (April 2000 to September 2007). Patients were stratified: those with or without at least moderate CKD (creatinine clearance,
PubMed ID
20031733 View in PubMed
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Angiographic and clinical outcomes of drug-eluting versus bare metal stent deployment in the Occluded Artery Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151893
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 May 1;73(6):771-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2009
Author
Vladimír Dzavík
Christopher E Buller
Gerard Devlin
Ronald G Carere
G B John Mancini
Warren J Cantor
Pawel E Buszman
James M Rankin
Carlos Vozzi
John R Ross
Sandra Forman
Bruce A Barton
A Gervasio A Lamas
Judith S Hochman
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 May 1;73(6):771-9
Date
May-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - etiology
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Canada
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Occlusion - mortality - physiopathology - radiography - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology - radiography
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Heart Failure - etiology
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Male
Metals
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Risk assessment
Stents
Stroke Volume
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
The majority of patients randomized to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) and its angiographic substudy, the Total Occlusion Study of Canada 2 (TOSCA-2) were treated with bare metal stents (BMS). We aimed to determine if stenting of the target occlusion in OAT with drug-eluting stents (DES) was associated with more favorable angiographic results and clinical outcome when compared with treatment with BMS.
TOSCA-2 DES was a prospective nonrandomized substudy that provided 1-year angiographic comparison of late loss and reocclusion in 25 patients treated with DES and in 128 treated with BMS. In addition, all PCI-assigned patients enrolled from the time when DES were first utilized were similarly categorized (DES n = 77, and BMS n = 386) and compared using the 3-year cumulative OAT primary combined endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, or Class-IV heart failure, as well as angina.
In-segment late loss was 0.14 +/- 0.45 mm for DES and 0.75 +/- 0.86 mm for BMS (P
Notes
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Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 May 1;73(6):78019370758
PubMed ID
19309733 View in PubMed
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Antiplatelet therapy following drug-eluting stent implantation: new clinical data and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157572
Source
Minerva Cardioangiol. 2008 Feb;56(1):139-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
J M Paradis
G. Ducrocq
J F Tanguay
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, Montreal, Montreal Heart Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Minerva Cardioangiol. 2008 Feb;56(1):139-54
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Disease - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - prevention & control
Coronary Thrombosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prevalence
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Technological developments in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) allow the possibility for less invasive revascularization in an increasing number of patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Bare-metal stents (BMS) have considerably improved the efficacy of PCI in addition to greatly reducing restenosis. However, even with standard stents, restenosis has remained a significant limitation of this revascularization technique. The advent of drug-eluting stents (DES) has dramatically reduced in-stent restenosis and, as a result, the need for repeat revascularization. However, their potential thrombogenicity has raised concerns about their clinical utility and long-term safety. Indeed, there is a possible higher rate of late stent thrombosis (LST) with DES compared with BMS. Antiplatelet therapy has been shown to be efficient in preventing DES thrombosis. Nevertheless, in the future, significant improvement will occur to improve the safety and efficacy of this therapy. This article will summarize the pathophysiology and the epidemiology of stent thrombosis (ST). Definitions of definite, probable and possible ST will be described. Furthermore, clinical risk factors for ST will be clearly enumerated. Then, the various antiplatelet therapeutic strategies used to prevent ST will be taken in consideration. Finally, a summary of the major recommendations about antiplatelet therapy made by some of the most prestigious learned societies will be presented.
PubMed ID
18432176 View in PubMed
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Antiplatelet therapy: No need for extended DAPT after stenting in the ARCTIC-Interruption trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271611
Source
Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Oct;11(10):556
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Gregory B Lim
Source
Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Oct;11(10):556
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Artery Disease - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Humans
Male
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 2014 Nov 1;384(9954):1577-8525037988
PubMed ID
25093435 View in PubMed
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Bioabsorbable polymer everolimus-eluting stents in patients with acute myocardial infarction: a report from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302185
Source
EuroIntervention. 2018 Aug 03; 14(5):e562-e569
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-03-2018
Author
Sergio Buccheri
Giovanna Sarno
Bo Lagerqvist
Göran Olivecrona
Kristina Hambraeus
Nils Witt
Daniel Lindholm
David Erlinge
Oskar Angerås
Stefan James
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology and Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
EuroIntervention. 2018 Aug 03; 14(5):e562-e569
Date
Aug-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absorbable Implants
Coronary Angiography
Drug-Eluting Stents
Everolimus
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - surgery
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Polymers
Registries
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The clinical performance of the SYNERGY drug-eluting stent (DES) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) has not been investigated in detail. We sought to report on the outcomes after SYNERGY DES (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) implantation in patients with MI undergoing percutaneous revascularisation (PCI).
We included all consecutive patients with MI undergoing PCI with the SYNERGY DES and newer-generation DES (n-DES group) in Sweden. From March 2013 to September 2016, a total of 36,292 patients, of whom 39.7% presented with ST-elevation MI, were included. As compared to patients in the n-DES group (n=31,403), patients in the SYNERGY group (n=4,889) were older and presented more often with left main or three-vessel disease involvement, as well as with restenotic lesions (p
PubMed ID
29792402 View in PubMed
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Blood level of CD45+ platelets and development of restenosis after drug-eluting stent implantation in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282475
Source
Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2016 Dec;128(23-24):898-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Zufar Gabbasov
Sergey Kozlov
Svetlana Byazrova
Olga Saburova
Ivan Melnikov
Martin Caprnda
Eduard Curilla
Ludovit Gaspar
Peter Kruzliak
Vladimir Smirnov
Source
Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2016 Dec;128(23-24):898-905
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antigens, CD45 - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Platelets - pathology
Causality
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - epidemiology - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - blood - epidemiology
Drug-Eluting Stents - statistics & numerical data
Female
Graft Occlusion, Vascular - blood - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Platelet Count - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess CD45-positive platelets (CD45+ platelets) involvement in restenosis development after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).
The study comprised 126 male and female patients with stable angina pectoris, who underwent elective coronary stenting with DES and follow-up angiography within 6-12 months. The patients were assigned to the group with restenosis (n = 53) or group without restenosis (n = 73) according to the follow-up angiograms. In both groups we compared the level in blood of CD45+ platelets, the clinical, laboratory and angiographic variables, which may affect the development of restenosis. We have also constructed a logit regression model for prognosis of restenosis occurrence after DES implantation.
The blood count of CD45+ platelets was higher in patients with restenosis than in patients without: 0.82?% (0.58; 1.12) vs. 0.34?% (0.20; 0.68), p 
PubMed ID
27637207 View in PubMed
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97 records – page 1 of 10.