Skip header and navigation

Refine By

44 records – page 1 of 5.

An assessment of quality of sleep and the use of drugs with sedating properties in hospitalized adult patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180959
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Mar 24;2:17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-2004
Author
Luciana Frighetto
Carlo Marra
Shakeel Bandali
Kerry Wilbur
Terryn Naumann
Peter Jewesson
Author Affiliation
Pharmaceutical Sciences Clinical Service Unit, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Center, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada. frighett@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Mar 24;2:17
Date
Mar-24-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Chronic Disease
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Teaching - utilization
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sickness Impact Profile
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - drug therapy - etiology
Abstract
Hospitalization can significantly disrupt sleeping patterns. In consideration of the previous reports of insomnia and apparent widespread use of benzodiazepines and other hypnotics in hospitalized patients, we conducted a study to assess quality of sleep and hypnotic drug use in our acute care adult patient population. The primary objectives of this study were to assess sleep disturbance and its determinants including the use of drugs with sedating properties.
This single-centre prospective study involved an assessment of sleep quality for consenting patients admitted to the general medicine and family practice units of an acute care Canadian hospital. A validated Verran and Snyder-Halpern (VSH) Sleep Scale measuring sleep disturbance, sleep effectiveness, and sleep supplementation was completed daily by patients and scores were compared to population statistics. Patients were also asked to identify factors influencing sleep while in hospital, and sedating drug use prior to and during hospitalization was also assessed.
During the 70-day study period, 100 patients completed at least one sleep questionnaire. There was a relatively even distribution of males versus females, most patients were in their 8th decade of life, retired, and suffered from multiple chronic diseases. The median self-reported pre-admission sleep duration for participants was 8 hours and our review of PharmaNet profiles revealed that 35 (35%) patients had received a dispensed prescription for a hypnotic or antidepressant drug in the 3-month period prior to admission. Benzodiazepines were the most common sedating drugs prescribed. Over 300 sleep disturbance, effective and supplementation scores were completed. Sleep disturbance scores across all study days ranged 16-681, sleep effectiveness scores ranged 54-402, while sleep supplementation scores ranged between 0-358. Patients tended to have worse sleep scores as compared to healthy non-hospitalized US adults in all three scales. When compared to US non-hospitalized adults with insomnia, our patients demonstrated sleep disturbance and supplementation scores that were similar on Day 1, but lower (i.e. improved) on Day 3, while sleep effectiveness were higher (i.e. better) on both days. There was an association between sleep disturbance scores and the number of chronic diseases, the presence of pain, the use of bedtime tricyclic antidepressants, and the number of chronic diseases without pain. There was also an association between sleep effectiveness scores and the length of hospitalization, the in hospital use of bedtime sedatives and the presence of pain. Finally, an association was identified between sleep supplementation scores and the in hospital use of bedtime sedatives (tricyclic antidepressants and loxapine), and age. Twenty-nine (29%) patients received a prescription for a hypnotic drug while in hospital, with no evidence of pre-admission hypnotic use. The majority of these patients were prescribed zopiclone, lorazepam or another benzodiazepine.
The results of this study reveal that quality of sleep is a problem that affects hospitalized adult medical service patients and a relatively high percentage of these patients are being prescribed a hypnotic prior to and during hospitalization.
Notes
Cites: Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Aug 7;42(1084):71-210932303
Cites: Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 1999 Dec;9 Suppl 6:S399-40510622686
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2001 Oct;49(10):1341-511890493
Cites: J Clin Pharm Ther. 2002 Apr;27(2):93-711975692
Cites: Clin Nurs Res. 2003 May;12(2):159-7312741668
Cites: Am J Nurs. 1982 Jun;82(6):936-406920223
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1984 Mar;100(3):398-4046141753
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 1987 Jun;10(3):155-633647537
Cites: Drug Saf. 1990 Sep-Oct;5(5):328-442222867
Cites: Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1992;108(3):248-551523276
Cites: Ann Pharmacother. 1995 Apr;29(4):354-87633010
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1995 Nov;41(5):473-817595266
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 1998 Feb;21(1):27-379472235
Cites: Ann Pharmacother. 1998 Jun;32(6):680-919640488
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1998 Nov;173:433-89926062
Cites: Drugs Aging. 1999 Feb;14(2):91-10310084363
Cites: Can J Clin Pharmacol. 1999 Autumn;6(3):149-5610495367
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Jan 25;162(2):216-2010674058
Cites: Intern Med J. 2001 Dec;31(9):529-3511767867
PubMed ID
15040803 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appropriateness of omeprazole prescribing in Quebec's senior population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195938
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2000 Sep;14(8):676-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
J P Grégoire
J. Moisan
I. Chabot
M. Gaudet
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Pharmacie et Groupe de recherche in epidémiologie, Université Laval, Québec. Jean-Pierre.Gregoire@pha.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2000 Sep;14(8):676-80
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Enzyme Inhibitors - economics - therapeutic use
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Omeprazole - economics - therapeutic use
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Proton-Translocating ATPases - antagonists & inhibitors
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Prescribing omeprazole for the treatment of digestive disorders accounts for an important part of the costs in Quebec's drug benefit plan. In July 1993, the Quebec drug program listed omeprazole, with restriction, in its formulary. On January 1, 1994, this restriction was lifted; since then, omeprazole has been listed in the regular provincial formulary.
To describe the appropriateness of initial omeprazole prescribing in the ambulatory senior population of Quebec in the 27 months after being listed without restriction.
A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using prescription and medical services claims databases of the Quebec drug program. Data were extracted for elderly patients who received their first omeprazole prescription between July 1, 1994 and March 31, 1996.
Among the 47,140 first-time users of omeprazole identified, 7516 (15.9%) had had an endoscopy in the previous six months, 2308 (4.9%) were given an antimicrobial agent and omeprazole simultaneously, and 22,730 (48.2%) received omeprazole after prior use of an H2 receptor antagonist (H2RA) or a prokinetic drug. A total of 26,525 (56.3%) first-time users were prescribed omeprazole based on at least one of the three criteria listed above. Among these users, 729 (2.8%) received an H2RA concurrently with omeprazole. Altogether, 25,796 (54.7%) first-time users received omeprazole appropriately.
Although reimbursement for omeprazole prescriptions has not been restricted in Quebec since January 1, 1994, it was prescribed appropriately for elderly patients in the majority of cases studied.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Gastroenterol. 2000 Sep;14(8):66711185529
PubMed ID
11185532 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of regional variation in polypharmacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97865
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2010 Apr;19(4):375-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Bo Hovstadius
Bengt Astrand
Göran Petersson
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. bo.hovstadius@se.pwc.com
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2010 Apr;19(4):375-83
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Polypharmacy
Prescription Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess polypharmacy in a population with emphasis on regions. METHODS: We studied the individual-based data of all dispensed prescription drugs (DP) during a 3-month study period in Sweden 2006. As an indicator of polypharmacy, five or more (DP > or = 5) different drugs (substances) dispensed were applied. For analysis, we used comparisons of prevalence, correlation of prevalence of polypharmacy with different socioeconomic variables, and a novel weighted polypharmacy index. RESULTS: The national prevalence of polypharmacy, DP > or = 5, was 10.5% (inter-regional variation 9.1-12.1%). The regional variation in the prevalence of polypharmacy was largest for the age groups > or =90 (45.6-59.1%), 80-89 (46.1-53.4%) and 70-79 years (33.1-38.0%). The national prevalence of excessive polypharmacy, DP > or = 10, was 2.2% (inter-regional variation 1.9-2.6%). The regional variation in prevalence of excessive polypharmacy was largest for the age groups > or =90 (9.8-22.3%), 80-89 (11.4-17.1%) and 70-79 years (7.0-9.4%). We found a fairly strong positive correlation between polypharmacy and the age group > or =70 years (r = 0.84 for men and 0.71 for women). The novel weighted polypharmacy index indicated regional differences in the internal distribution of the prevalence of dispensed drugs for individuals with polypharmacy. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the observed regional differences in the prevalence of polypharmacy partly can be explained by the regional age distribution in Sweden. The use of the novel weighted polypharmacy index indicated regional differences in drug therapy for individuals with polypharmacy.
PubMed ID
20191596 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of polypharmacy with nutritional status, functional ability and cognitive capacity over a three-year period in an elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137164
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 May;20(5):514-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Johanna Jyrkkä
Hannes Enlund
Piia Lavikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. johanna.jyrkka@uef.fi
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 May;20(5):514-22
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Malnutrition - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status - physiology
Polypharmacy
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To determine the association of polypharmacy with nutritional status, functional ability and cognitive capacity among elderly persons.
This was a prospective cohort study of 294 survivors from the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for the Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) Study, with yearly follow-ups during 2004 to 2007. Participants were the citizens of Kuopio, Finland, aged 75 years and older at baseline. Polypharmacy status was categorized as non-polypharmacy (0-5 drugs), polypharmacy (6-9 drugs) and excessive polypharmacy (10+ drugs). A linear mixed model approach was used for analysis the impact of polypharmacy on short form of mini nutritional assessment (MNA-SF), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and mini-mental status examination (MMSE) scores.
Excessive polypharmacy was associated with declined nutritional status (p?=?0.001), functional ability (p?
PubMed ID
21308855 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beliefs about medicines among Swedish pharmacy employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82229
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2006 Aug;28(4):233-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Jörgensen Tove M
Andersson Karolina A
Mårdby Ann-Charlotte M
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, P.O. Box 453, 405 30, Göteborg, Sweden. Tove.Jorgensen@socmed.gu.se
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2006 Aug;28(4):233-8
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Contraceptives, Oral - therapeutic use
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homeopathy - statistics & numerical data
Hormone Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medicine, Herbal - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pharmacies
Pharmacists - classification - psychology
Pharmacists' Aides - classification - psychology
Professional Role
Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the beliefs about medicines among pharmacy employees. A further aim was to analyse whether these beliefs were associated with any background characteristics, such as age, professional category or medication use. METHOD: The study subjects were pharmacy employees at 24 community pharmacies in Göteborg, Sweden. The participating pharmacies had a total of 372 employees (pharmacists, dispensing pharmacists, and pharmacy technicians). Data was collected at the weekly pharmacy information meetings with a questionnaire comprising background questions and the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ). The general part of the BMQ was used. For each statement in the BMQ, respondents marked their degree of agreement on a five-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree, 2=disagree, 3=uncertain, 4=agree and 5=strongly agree). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The three subscales of BMQ General: General Harm, General Overuse and General Benefit. RESULTS: The majority of the 292 respondents were dispensing pharmacists. More than half of the respondents were aged 45 years or older and had worked in a pharmacy for 20 years or more. Compared to the other professional categories, a higher proportion of dispensing pharmacists stated that they currently used traditional medicines. The pharmacy employees had a mean score for General Benefit of 4.31 and a mean score for General Harm of 1.81. Pharmacists and dispensing pharmacists in general regarded medicines as somewhat more beneficial, whereas pharmacy technicians viewed medicines as slightly more harmful. Those who had worked in a pharmacy for 30-34 years regarded medicines as less harmful compared to those who had worked 0-4 years. Compared to non-users, current users of prescription drugs regarded medicines as more beneficial. When controlling for background characteristics, no confounders were detected for any of the three subscales (ANCOVA analyses). CONCLUSION: Results of the study of 292 Swedish pharmacy employees show that they regard medicines as beneficial rather than harmful and that there are differences in beliefs between the professional categories. However, the reasons for these differences remain unclear. Nevertheless, the positive beliefs among pharmacy employees may have an impact on the communication with clients and, eventually, clients' adherence to medicines.
PubMed ID
16691361 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in pattern of use, clinical characteristics and persistence rate of hormone replacement therapy among postmenopausal women after the WHI publication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168678
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Jan;16(1):17-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Marie-Pascale Guay
Alice Dragomir
Danielle Pilon
Yola Moride
Sylvie Perreault
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Jan;16(1):17-27
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data - trends
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - prevention & control
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Patient Dropouts
Publishing - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
The WHI was stopped prematurely because of an increased risk of breast cancer, stroke and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the hormone replacement therapy (HRT) arm of the trial. Changes in the use of HRT are expected.
To assess the impact of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) publication on the rate of HRT prescription, and the clinical characteristics and persistence rate of new users and its determinants.
From the RAMQ databases, the total numbers of HRT prescriptions, and of new HRT's users were calculated between 2 January 1998 and 31 May 2003. To assess the clinical characteristics of women, two retrospective cohorts of new HRT's users were constructed before (pre-WHI) and after (post-WHI) the WHI study publication. The persistence rate after 1 year of follow-up was estimated using a Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox regression models were used to estimate the rate ratio of HRT cessation.
The total numbers of HRT users and of new users declined respectively by 28% and 50% in post-WHI. The standard dosage of HRT was significantly less used, while the proportion of women with risk factors of CVD or at very high risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) did not change. The rate of persistence in the pre-WHI cohort was 59% compared to 45% in the post-WHI (p
PubMed ID
16794994 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ciprofloxacin use under a reserved drug and stepdown promotion program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215833
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1995 Feb;48(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
L. Frighetto
S M Martinusen
F. Mamdani
P J Jewesson
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, BC.
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1995 Feb;48(1):35-42
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Ciprofloxacin - economics - therapeutic use
Data Collection
Drug Costs
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Male
Parenteral Nutrition
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - economics
Research Design
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study retrospectively evaluated the use of parenteral ciprofloxacin (PC) under the influence of a reserved antimicrobial drug program and an intravenous-oral stepdown program. During the first three months following its formulary introduction, 92 PC treatment courses were initiated. Fifty of these treatment courses in 49 adults were randomly selected for study. The hematology service accounted for 50% of the courses reviewed. The balance were initiated in the intensive care unit (16%), and six other services (34%). PC was used for the treatment of febrile neutropenia (50%), respiratory tract infections (20%), gram-negative sepsis (10%), and five other indications. Initial use of the intravenous formulation was considered appropriate in 92% of courses. Stepdown therapy occurred in 17 (34%) of treatment courses. Of the 26 patients considered candidates for oral therapy, seven patients (27%) were eligible for earlier stepdown and nine patients (35%) did not receive oral drug. According to our criteria, unnecessary use of the intravenous route occurred in 20% of PC treatment days. Mean total cost (acquisition plus delivery) of therapy per course was $668. This cost was higher in the hematology service (mean $990) than any other service (p = 0.0015). When stepdown therapy was employed the mean daily cost of therapy was $43.63 vs. $55.61 when the oral dosage form was not used (p = 0.04). Parenteral drug costs totalling $6245 were avoided by subsequent use of the oral dosage form. If full compliance with stepdown criteria had occurred, an estimated total savings of $10,769 could have been realized.
PubMed ID
10141061 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical characteristics of patients with drug hypersensitivity in Norway: a single-centre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134952
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 May;20(5):506-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Fatemeh Chalabianloo
Aud Berstad
Jan Schjøtt
Bettina Riedel
Agot Irgens
Erik Florvaag
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Section for Clinical Pharmacology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. fatemeh.chalabianloo@helse-bergen.no
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 May;20(5):506-13
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Drug Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Skin Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) represent an important public health problem. Knowledge of their clinical characteristics will provide improved diagnostic approaches to this topic.
The aim of the present study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with suspected DHRs.
The medical records of 206 outpatients with suspected DHRs, who consulted a Norwegian allergy centre from January 2005 to December 2009, were investigated in a retrospective study.
Mean age (range) was 44.3 (11-84) years, and 72% of the patients were women. The most common underlying diseases justifying the use of drugs were infections (49%) and pain-related diseases (23%). Antibiotics (53%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (32%), paracetamol (15%) and other drugs (46%), used as monotherapy or combinations, were the most often suspected drugs. Cutaneous symptoms were the most frequently reported symptoms (83%). Hospitalisation or prolonged hospitalisation was needed in 38% of the cases, and anaphylaxis was reported in 28% of all the patients. Skin prick tests were performed in 185 patients, of which 14 patients had positive test results. Drug provocation tests (DPTs) were performed in only 86 patients, six of which had positive reactions. DHRs were confirmed in 24 and rejected in 81 patients. Unsettled cases (39%) were mainly due to not performing DPTs.
Suspected DHRs occur predominantly in women. The most common manifestations are cutaneous symptoms, but life-threatening reactions justifying hospitalisation may occur. Antibiotics and NSAIDs are the two drug families most frequently suspected. DPTs need to be included in diagnostic protocols in order to evaluate suspected DHRs.
PubMed ID
21523851 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of recorded medication use in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway with prescribed medicines registered in the Norwegian Prescription Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136717
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Mar;20(3):243-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Marte Gravseth Espnes
Tone Bjørge
Anders Engeland
Author Affiliation
University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Mar;20(3):243-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Certificates
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Humans
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage - classification
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Maternal medication use during pregnancy is explored extensively, as it may cause birth defects. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of recorded medication use in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN).
This study was based on the nationwide population-based registries, the MBRN and the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD). These registries were linked using a unique 11-digit identification number. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of recorded medication use in MBRN were computed using data from NorPD as the reference.
Among the 163,678 pregnancies included in our study, the sensitivity for total drug use during pregnancy was calculated to be 32% and PPV was 82%. When we looked at the use of medication during the whole pregnancy, the sensitivities of drug registration for the main groups in the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)-classification varied from 50% (ATC group H) to 2% (ATC group S).
The medication use recorded in MBRN is poor compared with prescribed medicines registered in NorPD. There was a substantial difference between the different ATC codes regarding the sensitivity of MBRN in the registration of medication use during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
21351305 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does Pregabalin (Lyrica(®) ) help patients reduce their use of benzodiazepines? A comparison with gabapentin using the Norwegian Prescription Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139743
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2010 Nov;107(5):883-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Jørgen G Bramness
Pål Sandvik
Anders Engeland
Svetlana Skurtveit
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. j.g.bramness@medisin.uio.no
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2010 Nov;107(5):883-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Anti-Anxiety Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Databases, Factual
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Therapy, Combination
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Young Adult
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Pregabalin (Lyrica(®) ) may have an anxiolytic effect. It has also been reported that the use of this drug helps prevent excessive use of benzodiazepines. The aim of the present study was to examine if pregabalin reduced the intake of benzodiazepines. In a pharmacoepidemiological study, we compared pregabalin to the older drug gabapentin (Neurontin(®) ) in the Norwegian Prescription Database. The database has total capture of all prescribed drugs outside institutions. We identified all prescriptions for the two drugs for patients aged 18-69 years between 2004 and 2007. Patients were grouped as psychiatric patients, patients with epilepsy, patients with neuropathic pain or non-specified users. We measured the use of benzodiazepines 182 days before and after the initiation of treatment with pregabalin and gabapentin. Between 15% and 29% of the patients were able to stop using benzodiazepines after starting pregabalin or gabapentin treatment. Psychiatric patients who started pregabalin were able to reduce the amount of benzodiazepines used by 48%, compared to only 14% among starters of gabapentin. This study shows that some patients reduced their use of benzodiazepines substantially after starting pregabalin.
PubMed ID
22545971 View in PubMed
Less detail

44 records – page 1 of 5.