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The Canadian Optometry Survey: report on the utilization of diagnostic pharmaceutical agents by Canadian optometrists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229118
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 1990 May;67(5):366-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
P D Krueger
R C Trevino
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 1990 May;67(5):366-71
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Cyclopentolate - diagnostic use
Demography
Drug Utilization - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Humans
Optometry - trends
Phenylacetates - diagnostic use
Pupil - drug effects
Pyridines - diagnostic use
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Tropicamide - diagnostic use
Abstract
This study represents the first national survey of optometrists in Canada. A mailed questionnaire was designed and implemented in order to discover how optometrists have reacted to the introduction of diagnostic pharmaceutical agent (DPA) legislation in Canada and to determine what variables are important predictors of DPA use. The data collected were also used to test the null hypothesis that DPA legislation does not affect the use of mydriatic/cycloplegic agents by optometrists. A stratified random sampling procedure was used to select 230 optometrists (roughly 10% of the practicing profession) for inclusion in the study. Over 90% of the subjects completed and returned the questionnaire. A statistically significant and important association was found between mydriatic/cycloplegic drug use and legislation (p less than 0.05 and odds ratio = 2.18). Legislation, type of practice, age, and optometry school attended were all found to be associated with DPA use.
PubMed ID
2367092 View in PubMed
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Drugs foresight 2020: a Delphi expert panel study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260069
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2014;9:18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Tomi Lintonen
Anne Konu
Sanna Rönkä
Elina Kotovirta
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2014;9:18
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Consensus
Delivery of Health Care
Delphi Technique
Drug Utilization - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Drug and Narcotic Control - trends
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Policy Making
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Historically substance misuse has been relatively common in western countries, but comparatively few Finns report drug use. The Drugs 2020 study aimed at foreseeing changes in the drug situation in Finland by the year 2020.
The Delphi method was used, utilizing drug experts of the EU national network in Finland.
Marked growth was foreseen in drug use, especially in synthetic designer drugs and misuse of medicinal drugs. Significant increase was also expected in growing cannabis at home. However, the control of drug market was expected to shift more into the hands of organized crime. No consensus was reached on how drug prices will develop in the time period. Drug use is likely to remain punishable although the use and possession of cannabis may be treated less severely. It seems likely that health and social services resources will be directed towards medicinal treatment.
Foresight can be utilized in preparing for the future; desirable developments can be fostered, and measures can be taken to curb probable but undesirable lines of development. Based on the results of this study, the experts' view is that it is highly likely that the Finnish society will have to prepare for an increase in the demand for drug-related care, both in terms of content of the care and financing the services. Also, the forecasted increase in the role of legal prescription medicine used as intoxicants will call for efforts not only in changing prescription practices but in border and police control measures, as well. Parallel developments have been foreseen in the UK and Sweden, and it is likely that similar trends will actualize also in other western countries.
Notes
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Cites: J Psychopharmacol. 2005 Jul;19(4):32515982986
Cites: J Sci Med Sport. 2014 Jan;17(1):61-623517759
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2013 Jul;45(1):19-2823790985
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2013;18(22). pii: 2049123787082
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Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1994 Jun;19(6):1221-57930104
Cites: J Med Educ. 1979 Feb;54(2):101-6762686
Cites: J Sch Health. 1976 Mar;46(3):148-571044937
PubMed ID
24885142 View in PubMed
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Effects of prescription adaptation by pharmacists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139248
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:313
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Michael R Law
Steven G Morgan
Sumit R Majumdar
Larry D Lynd
Carlo A Marra
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, School of Population and Public Health, The University of British Columbia, 201-2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada. mlaw@chspr.ubc.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:313
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Community Pharmacy Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Reform
Humans
Male
Pharmacists - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Policy Making
Professional Autonomy
Professional Role
Risk assessment
Abstract
Granting dispensing pharmacists the authority to prescribe has significant implications for pharmaceutical and health human resources policy, and quality of care. Despite the growing number of jurisdictions that have given pharmacists such privileges, there are few rigorous evaluations of these policy changes. This study will examine a January 2009 policy change in British Columbia (BC), Canada that allowed pharmacists to independently adapt and renew prescriptions. We hypothesize this policy increased drug utilization and drug costs, increased patient adherence to medication, and reduced total healthcare resource use.
We will study a population-based cohort of approximately 4 million BC residents from 2004 through 2010. We will use data from BC PharmaNet on all of the prescriptions obtained by this cohort during the study period, and link it to administrative billings from physicians and hospital discharges. Using interrupted time series analysis, we will study longitudinal changes in drug utilization and costs, medication adherence, and short-term health care use. Further, using hierarchical modelling, we will examine the factors at the regional, pharmacy, patient, and prescription levels that are associated with prescription adaptations and renewals.
In a recent survey of Canadian policymakers, many respondents ranked the issue of prescribing privileges as one of their most pressing policy questions. No matter the results of our study, they will be important for policymakers, as our data will make policy decisions surrounding pharmacist prescribing more evidence-based.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Oct 16;165(8):1011-911699696
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 May 26;180(11):E72-8119468106
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Jun 25;166(13):1655-6212126319
Cites: J Clin Pharm Ther. 2002 Aug;27(4):299-30912174032
Cites: Am J Hosp Pharm. 1990 Mar;47(3):533-432316538
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1997 Oct 15;127(8 Pt 2):757-639382394
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Aug 4;353(5):487-9716079372
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;50(10):605-1316276851
Cites: J Clin Pharm Ther. 2007 Dec;32(6):545-5618021331
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:7918402681
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2008 Oct;13(4):215-2118806179
Cites: Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2008 Nov 15;65(22):2126-3218997141
Cites: Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2008 Nov 15;65(22):2152-318997146
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2008;8:5719061487
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;62(2):143-819010644
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Mar 14;346(11):822-911893794
PubMed ID
21083922 View in PubMed
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Methadone treatment in Ontario after the 1996 regulation reforms. Results of a physician survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187094
Source
Ann Med Interne (Paris). 2002 Nov;153(7 Suppl):2S11-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Benedikt Fischer
Deanna Cape
Natalie Daniel
Louis Gliksman
Author Affiliation
Center for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. benedikt_fischer@camh.net
Source
Ann Med Interne (Paris). 2002 Nov;153(7 Suppl):2S11-21
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Utilization - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Methadone - therapeutic use
Narcotics - therapeutic use
Ontario
Opioid-Related Disorders - drug therapy
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Abstract
Over two decades of rather restrictive regulations have kept the availability of methadone treatment (MT) at low levels in the province of Ontario, Canada. Regulatory changes in the Province of Ontario in the mid-1990s relaxed relevant authorization and treatment practice guidelines. Subsequently, the number of physicians authorized for methadone treatment and treatment spots increased substantially. A large number of the newly authorized physicians are general/local medical practitioners. This study reports on the results of a survey conducted with the majority of MT prescribing physicians in Ontario authorized at the time of study. Physicians were surveyed on their attitudes and practices with regards to the MT authorization system, treatment approaches, requirements and workload, patient 'stability', additional opiate substitution treatment needs, and with regards to general issues and concerns about the new MT governance system. The article also discusses patterns and differences that were found between physicians when comparing their geographic location, whether they see themselves practicing under a 'harm reduction' or an 'abstinence' approach, and whether they received MT authorization under the old or the new guidelines. It is concluded that the liberalized regulations and the increased incorporation of local physicians seems to provide for an overall more desirable system of governance of MT. However, some relevant concerns about the current system exist and are discussed.
PubMed ID
12518078 View in PubMed
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[The clausulation for gabapentin and pregabalin was not used in accordance to the rules].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170550
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Feb 20;168(8):811; author reply 811-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2006

[The requirement to use the cheapest synonymous preparation--does it work as intended?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219812
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Nov 30;113(29):3582-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1993
Author
E. Horgen
R. Kristensen
O. Smiseth
J R Eskerud
H. Melsom
Author Affiliation
Senter for helseadministrasjon Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Nov 30;113(29):3582-5
Date
Nov-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Drug Costs
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization - legislation & jurisprudence
Drugs, Generic - economics
Humans
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
A retrospective analysis of all prescriptions for hypersensitive drugs was undertaken at a pharmacy serving 20 general practitioners and 17 temporarily employed doctors. The analysis was carried out in 1992 over two three-month periods separated by an interval of five months. The Governmental regulations aimed at promoting use of the "cheapest synonymous drug" apparently had little impact on the doctors' prescriptions. During the 11 months concerned, the prescribed antihypersensitive drugs contained an increasing share of expensive alternatives with no documented ability to reduce cardiovascular morbidity or mortality.
PubMed ID
8273099 View in PubMed
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Use of intravenous heparin by North American neurologists: do the data matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189876
Source
Stroke. 2002 Jun;33(6):1574-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Ahmad Al-Sadat
Mohammad Sunbulli
Seemant Chaturvedi
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Stroke Program, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich 48201, USA.
Source
Stroke. 2002 Jun;33(6):1574-7
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Brain Ischemia - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Clinical Trials as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Heparin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Liability, Legal
Neurology - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Stroke - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Our aim was to determine current usage patterns of intravenous heparin for patients with acute ischemic stroke.
A survey was undertaken of 280 neurologists from the United States and 270 neurologists from Canada. Brief vignettes were presented for the following 5 scenarios: stroke in evolution, atrial fibrillation-related stroke (A FIB), vertebrobasilar stroke, carotid territory stroke, and multiple transient ischemic attacks. The effect of medicolegal factors was also ascertained. Statistical comparisons were done with chi-squared testing.
US neurologists were significantly more likely than Canadian neurologists to use intravenous heparin for patients with stroke in evolution (51% versus 33%, P
PubMed ID
12052993 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.