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[900 tons of drugs are returned to pharmacies annually. A questionnaire study on unused drugs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180861
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Mar 4;101(10):898-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2004
Author
Kerstin Hulter Asberg
Author Affiliation
Medicinskt centrum, Lasarettet i Enköping. kerstin.hulter.asberg@lul.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Mar 4;101(10):898-900
Date
Mar-4-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations - economics
Pharmacies
Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Refusal
PubMed ID
15055052 View in PubMed
Less detail

An analysis of psychotropic drug sales. Increasing sales of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are closely related to number of products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133729
Source
Int J Risk Saf Med. 2011;23(2):125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Margrethe Nielsen
Peter Gøtzsche
Author Affiliation
The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Rigs hospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. marn@phmetropol.dk
Source
Int J Risk Saf Med. 2011;23(2):125-32
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - economics
Benzodiazepines - economics
Commerce
Denmark
Drug Prescriptions - economics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Economics, Pharmaceutical
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - economics
Marketing
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - economics
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - economics
Abstract
Prescribing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has increased dramatically.
To compare the sales of benzodiazepines and SSRIs within the primary care sector in Denmark and relate changes in usage to number of indications and products on the market.
We used data from various sources to establish the sales curves of psychotropic drugs in the period 1970 to 2007, based on the Anatomic Therapeutic Classification system and Defined Daily Doses.
Fluctuations in sales of psychotropic drugs that cannot be explained by disease prevalence were caused by changes in sales of the benzodiazepines and SSRIs. We found a decline in the sales of benzodiazepines after a peak in 1986, likely due to the recognition that they cause dependence. From a low level in 1992, we found that the sales of SSRIs increased almost linearly by a factor of 18, up to 44 DDD per 1000 inhabitants, which was closely related to the number of products on the market that increased by a factor of 16.
Sales of antidepressant drugs are mainly determined by market availability of products indicating that marketing pressures are playing an important role. Thus the current level of use of SSRIs may not be evidence-based, which is supported by studies showing that the effect of SSRIs has been overestimated.
PubMed ID
21673422 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Antiepileptic treatment nearly six times more expensive since 1990].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186772
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jan 9;100(1-2):42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-2003
Author
Peter M Persson
Asmeret Russom
Torbjörn Tomson
Author Affiliation
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus. peter.persson@apoteket.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jan 9;100(1-2):42-6
Date
Jan-9-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticonvulsants - administration & dosage - economics
Drug Costs - trends
Drug Prescriptions - economics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Epilepsy - drug therapy - economics
Humans
Inflation, Economic
Physician's Practice Patterns
Sweden
Abstract
There is a six-fold increase in the costs for antiepileptic drug prescriptions in Sweden from 1990 to 2000. This is mainly caused by a gradual increase in the prescribing of new and more expensive drugs, since the total use of antiepileptic drugs, expressed as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants, is almost unchanged during the same time period. A marked variation in the prescribing of new antiepileptic drugs between different counties in Sweden, suggests that the role of the new compounds is still unclear. The cost effectiveness of new antiepileptic drugs in relation to the older drugs requires further evaluation.
PubMed ID
12572136 View in PubMed
Less detail

Booming prescription drug expenditure: a population-based analysis of age dynamics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172853
Source
Med Care. 2005 Oct;43(10):996-1008
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Steven G Morgan
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. morgan@chspr.ubc.ca
Source
Med Care. 2005 Oct;43(10):996-1008
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Population Dynamics
Prescription Fees - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
Prescription drug expenditures in North America have nearly doubled in the past 5 years, creating intense pressure for all public and private benefits managers and policymakers.
The objective of this study was to describe age-specific drug expenditure trends from 1996 to 2002 for the Canadian province of British Columbia.
This study shows changes in expenditures per capita quantified for 5 age categories: residents aged 0 to 19, 20 to 44, 45 to 64, 65 to 84, and 85 and older. The cost impacts of 7 determinants of prescription drug expenditures are quantified.
This study describes population-based, patient-specific pharmaceutical data showing the type, quantity, and cost of every prescription drug purchased by virtually all residents of British Columbia.
Population-wide expenditures per capita grew at a rate of 11.6% per annum. Growth was primarily driven by the selection of more costly drugs per course of treatment and increases in the number concomitant treatments received per patient. Population aging did not have a major impact on expenditures. However, expenditure per capita grew most rapid among residents aged 45 to 64, the cohort that expended most over the period. The aging of this demographic cohort may threaten the financial viability of age-based drug benefit programs.
PubMed ID
16166869 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing patterns of secondary preventive medication among newly diagnosed coronary heart disease patients with diabetes in Finland: a register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144891
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 May;38(3):317-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Tuulikki Vehko
Kristna Manderbacka
Martti Arffman
Reijo Sund
Antti Reunanen
Ilmo Keskimäki
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland. tuulikki.vehko@thl.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 May;38(3):317-24
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - administration & dosage
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - drug therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy
Drug Prescriptions - economics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Registries
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Secondary Prevention
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Information on medicine use among coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with diabetes in unselected patient populations is scarce. This study examines the use of medication to prevent new cardiac events among newly diagnosed CHD patients with diabetes comparing them to patients without diabetes and examines socioeconomic differences in medicine use in these patient groups.
Data on CHD patients (43,501 men and 31,125 women) with or without diabetes were individually linked from nationwide registers (covering both patients treated in ambulatory and in hospital inpatient care). Age-standardised rates for medication use were calculated and differences between patient groups examined using Poisson regression.
beta-blocker use was high in all patient groups in 1997-2002, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and angiotensin II antagonist use increased and remained higher among patients with diabetes. More than half of men and women with diabetes used ACE inhibitors and one out of five used angiotensin II antagonists in 2002. Lipid-lowering medication use increased, especially among women. In 1997-98 it was lower in lower socioeconomic groups; among men with diabetes the use remained lower than among others.
beta-blocker use was constant and ACE inhibitor and angiotensin II antagonist use increased. Lipid-lowering medication use increased considerably after a health insurance reform in 2000, in which elevated reimbursement of drug costs (75%) was extended to include all CHD patients with hyperlipidaemia.Socioeconomic differences in medication use disappeared after the reform. However, lipid-lowering medication use remained at a lower level among men with diabetes, suggesting that their treatment did not follow guidelines.
PubMed ID
20228159 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic catastrophes: exploring the concentration and sustained nature of ambulatory prescription drug expenditures in the population of British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153238
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Mar;68(5):919-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Gillian E Hanley
Steve Morgan
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3. ghanley@chspr.ubc.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Mar;68(5):919-24
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - economics
Analysis of Variance
British Columbia
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prescription Drugs - economics
Socioeconomic Factors
Universal Coverage
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous research has shown that a small proportion of the population accounts for a substantial proportion of spending on physician and hospital services. Much less is known about the high-cost users of ambulatory prescription medicines. We investigate the concentration and sustained nature of ambulatory prescription drug expenditures among residents of British Columbia, Canada in 2001 and 2004. Linking person-specific administrative data from several sources, we examine the demographics, socio-economic status, and health status of high-cost ambulatory pharmaceutical users and the extent that high-cost pharmaceutical use was sustained, at the individual level, from 2001 to 2004. The top 5% of users were responsible for 48% of ambulatory prescription expenditures in the province. A significant burden of morbidity, as well as sustained high expenditures, characterized these users. They were older, more likely to be female, more likely to be of low income, and more likely to be hospitalized and die within the year of study than other pharmaceutical users and non-users. Our results suggest that careful consideration should be given to the long-term financial burdens and access barriers created by pharmaceutical insurance policies that rely heavily on private payments by individuals. Our focus is on costs associated with ambulatory prescription drug use, however, had we included information on the cost of prescription drugs used in hospitals, we would likely have detected an even stronger relationship between high-cost pharmaceutical use and poor health status.
PubMed ID
19135288 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of alternative models of prescription drug utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215303
Source
Health Econ. 1995 May-Jun;4(3):183-98
Publication Type
Article
Author
P V Grootendorst
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, McMaster University, Canada.
Source
Health Econ. 1995 May-Jun;4(3):183-98
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Demography
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Econometric
Ontario
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The two-part estimation technique has been advocated for estimating models using individual level health care utilization data characterised by a large proportion of non-consumption and small proportions of heavy users. This paper compares the two-part model to several other estimators, including the Poisson, negative binomial and 'zero altered' negative binomial models on the basis of within-sample forecasting accuracy and non-nested model selection tests. The empirical model estimates the differential effect of the removal of copayments for prescription medicines on the prescription drug utilization by older adults with differing levels of health status. The two-part estimator of this model is found to dominate the competitors. Results from this model indicate that utilization increases appear to be higher among individuals with lower levels of health status.
PubMed ID
7550769 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of cefoxitin and ceftizoxime in a hospital therapeutic interchange program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221367
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Apr 1;148(7):1161-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1993
Author
S. Martinusen
D. Chen
L. Frighetto
D. Bunz
H G Stiver
P J Jewesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, Vancouver General Hospital, BC.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Apr 1;148(7):1161-9
Date
Apr-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Cefoxitin - economics - therapeutic use
Ceftizoxime - economics - therapeutic use
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Formularies, Hospital
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospitals, Teaching - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine whether (a) ceftizoxime can replace cefoxitin in the prevention and treatment of various infections in a major teaching hospital, (b) a previously applied two-stage intervention program is an effective method of instituting a therapeutic interchange of ceftizoxime for cefoxitin and (c) the replacement of cefoxitin with ceftizoxime results in a more cost-effective therapy.
Two-phase, open, sequential study.
Tertiary care teaching hospital.
One hundred patients who received cefoxitin during the 6 months immediately before the start of the interchange program (phase 1) and 100 who received ceftizoxime during the 6 months immediately after the start of the program (phase 2) were randomly selected.
The demographic characteristics of the two patient groups were similar except for sex (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
8457957 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2001 Feb;79(1):2-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
B M Calissendorff
Author Affiliation
St. Erik's Eye Hospital AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2001 Feb;79(1):2-5
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Glaucoma - drug therapy
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - drug effects
Middle Aged
Miotics - therapeutic use
Scandinavia
Abstract
During recent decades consumption of antiglaucoma drugs has shown a steady increase in the Nordic countries. The cost increase can partly be explained by the use of newer, more expensive drugs. The increase in daily doses, however, is relatively much larger than the corresponding ageing of the population. There are large national and regional differences. Measured in daily defined doses (DDD) the consumption of glaucoma medication is almost three times as high in Sweden as in Denmark. Within all the Nordic countries there exists up to more than two-fold regional differences between high- and low-consuming counties. The new classes of IOP-lowering drugs have been very quickly adopted. Statistical data indicate that adding new drugs is more common than switching to a new therapy.
PubMed ID
11167276 View in PubMed
Less detail

41 records – page 1 of 5.