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A 3-month evaluation of the efficacy of nedocromil sodium in asthma: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of nedocromil sodium conducted by a Canadian multicenter study group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229565
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1990 Mar;85(3):612-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
A S Rebuck
S. Kesten
L P Boulet
A. Cartier
D. Cockcroft
J. Gruber
F. Laberge
E. Lee-Chuy
M. Keshmiri
G F MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Edmonton General Hospital, Canada.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1990 Mar;85(3):612-7
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology
Canada
Chronic Disease
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Drug Tolerance
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Nedocromil
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate - drug effects - physiology
Quinolones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Time Factors
Abstract
Nedocromil sodium is a pyranoquinoline dicarboxylic acid derivative, formulated in a metered-dose inhaler. Because nedocromil sodium has in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties, it was evaluated in a group of steroid-dependent patients with asthma to observe how well it might be tolerated and for evidence of any beneficial effects. In a double-blind, group-comparative study, 127 patients received nedocromil sodium and 61 received placebo, administered as two puffs of 2 mg, four times per day, for 12 weeks. Ten patients developed adverse reactions, seven receiving active drug and three patients receiving placebo. Two patients of each group withdrew because of worsening asthma. Despite selecting patients whose asthma was stable, when they were receiving established therapeutic regimens that included steroids and bronchodilators, it was found that diary-card symptom scores, morning and evening peak expiratory flow rate values, and inhaled beta-agonist usage all demonstrated slight but significant benefit with addition of nedocromil sodium. It is concluded that the inhaled, anti-inflammatory agent, nedocromil sodium, may be added to asthma-treatment regimens with the reasonable expectation of further modest symptomatic benefit.
PubMed ID
2155958 View in PubMed
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5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonist with or without short-course dexamethasone in the prophylaxis of radiation induced emesis: a placebo-controlled randomized trial of the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (SC19).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168273
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2006 Jul 20;24(21):3458-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2006
Author
Rebecca K S Wong
Nancy Paul
Keyue Ding
Marlo Whitehead
Michael Brundage
Anthony Fyles
Derek Wilke
Abdenour Nabid
Andre Fortin
Don Wilson
Michael McKenzie
Ida Ackerman
Luis Souhami
Pierre Chabot
Joseph Pater
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group, Canada. Rebecca.wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2006 Jul 20;24(21):3458-64
Date
Jul-20-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiemetics - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Dexamethasone - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - drug therapy - etiology
Ondansetron - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists
Serotonin Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Vomiting - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic dexamethasone for the control of radiation induced emesis (RIE) when added to ondansetron during days 1 to 5 of fractionated radiotherapy. The study had two hypotheses: ondansetron and dexamethasone could provide superior control of RIE over ondansetron alone during the prophylactic period and; the combination could provide sustained control of RIE during subsequent fractions of radiotherapy.
Between May 2001 to Jan 2004, 211 patients receiving radiotherapy (> or = 15 fractions) to the upper abdomen were randomly assigned to receive ondansetron 8 mg bid with either dexamethasone 4 mg daily or placebo during fractions 1 to 5. Rescue antiemetics were provided.
During the prophylactic period there was a trend for improved complete control of nausea in the dexamethasone arm (50% v 38%; P = .06) while complete and partial control of emesis, average nausea score, and use of rescue medications were similar in the two groups. During the overall study period patients receiving dexamethasone had better complete control of emesis (23% v 12%; P = .02) and a lower average nausea score (0.28 v 0.39; P = .03); there was a trend towards less use of rescue medications with dexamethasone (70% v 80%; P = .09); other outcomes were similar on the two arms. Quality of life analysis showed a significant difference in appetite.
The addition of dexamethasone to ondansetron as prophylaxis provides a modest improvement in protection against RIE during moderately emetogenic fractionated radiotherapy. It is a potentially useful addition to 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists in this setting.
PubMed ID
16849762 View in PubMed
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A 10-year survey of clinically significant blood culture isolates and antibiotic susceptibilities from adult patients with hematological diseases at a major Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25350
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
H. Fredlund
M. Björeman
J. Kjellander
L. Sjöberg
L. Bjorne
A L Ohlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteria, Aerobic - isolation & purification
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination - therapeutic use
Female
Hematologic Diseases - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Leukemia - complications
Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute - complications
Lymphoma - complications
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Retrospective Studies
Septicemia - drug therapy - microbiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In patients treated with cytotoxic drugs granulocytopenia and septicemia are commonly seen. In this 10-year survey 324 blood culture isolates from 184 patients with hematological diseases and septicemia were studied. The distribution of microbiological diagnoses in patients with hematological diseases as well as acute leukemia 1980-1986 was significantly different (p less than 0.01) from an unselected blood culture material from the same period. The differences are mainly seen between Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci. The microbiological spectrum for patients with hematological disease 1987-1989 was also significantly different (p less than 0.05) from the spectrum of the same group of patients 1980-1986 due to higher frequencies of coagulase-negative staphylococci and alpha-streptococci and lower frequency of E. coli in the latter period. 40% of the isolates were gram-positive cocci during the first period and increased to 50% during the second period. The susceptibility testing indicates that trimethoprim/sulfonamide is not as good a choice as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin for oral antibiotic prophylaxis. For intravenous therapy imipenem/cilastatin or the combinations of an aminoglycoside/piperacillin or aminoglycoside/third generation cephalosporin have advantages over aminoglycoside/trimethoprim/sulfa in combination. However, addition of isoxazolylpenicillin or vancomycin now seems necessary to cover the increasing part of gram-positive bacteria causing septicemia in patients with hematological disease.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Infect Dis. 1991;23(4):5151957139
PubMed ID
2218401 View in PubMed
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A 26-week, prospective, open-label, uncontrolled, multicenter study to evaluate the effect of an escalating-dose regimen of trandolapril on change in blood pressure in treatment-naive and concurrently treated adult hypertensive subjects (TRAIL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163832
Source
Clin Ther. 2007 Feb;29(2):305-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Richard H Tytus
Ellen D Burgess
Linda Assouline
Anita Vanjaka
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Ther. 2007 Feb;29(2):305-15
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Indoles - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
This study evaluated the effectiveness of an escalating-dose regimen of trandolapril in subjects with stage 1 or stage 2 hypertension.
This was a 26-week, prospective, open-label,multicenter study in Canadian primary care centers. Subjects with hypertension who were treatment naive or whose disease was uncontrolled on current first-line antihypertensive monotherapy were treated with trandolapril for 26 weeks alone or in addition to their current treatment. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) >or=140/90 mm Hg in subjects with no other risk factors or >or=130/80 mm Hg in subjects with diabetes or kidney disease. Trandolapril therapy was initiated at 1 mg/d and was titrated as required to 2 or 4 mg at 4 and 9 weeks after initiation of treatment, respectively, in those not achieving BP targets. At 14 weeks after treatment initiation, subjects not achieving BP targets could receive a combination of trandolapril 4 mg plus a calcium channel blocker (verapamil 240 mg) with or without a diuretic. Primary outcome was the percentage of patients reaching target BP after 14 weeks.
A total of 1683 subjects from 192 general practice clinics across Canada completed the 14-week trandolapril dose-optimization phase, and 1650 completed the full 26-week follow-up. Mean (SD) age was 56.6 (12.6) years, and 49.2% of the subjects were men. At baseline, 82.4% (1359/1650) of subjects were antihypertensive-treatment naive. At the trial end, 73.4% (95% CI, 70.9-75.9) of subjects achieved a target level of SBP/DBP
PubMed ID
17472822 View in PubMed
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A 52-week prospective, cohort study of the effects of losartan with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145472
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
N. Racine
P. Hamet
J S Sampalis
N. Longo
N. Bastien
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - chemically induced
Diuretics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hydrochlorothiazide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hypertension - blood - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Linear Models
Losartan - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of an ARB, with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), on glycaemic factors and the risk for developing diabetes in hypertensive patients with the metabolic syndrome have not been fully assessed. This was a 52-week multicentre, prospective, phase-IV, open-label, cohort study of losartan or losartan/HCTZ in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome. All subjects were treated initially with losartan 50?mg?day(-1). Those not achieving target blood pressure (BP
PubMed ID
20147971 View in PubMed
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75% success rate after open debridement, exchange of tibial insert, and antibiotics in knee prosthetic joint infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267766
Source
Acta Orthop. 2015;86(4):457-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anna Holmberg
Valdís Gudrún Thórhallsdóttir
Otto Robertsson
Annette W-Dahl
Anna Stefánsdóttir
Source
Acta Orthop. 2015;86(4):457-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods
Debridement - methods
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prosthesis-Related Infections - therapy
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Rifampin - therapeutic use
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Sweden
Tibia - surgery
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Wound Healing
Abstract
Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a leading cause of early revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Open debridement with exchange of tibial insert allows treatment of infection with retention of fixed components. We investigated the success rate of this procedure in the treatment of knee PJIs in a nationwide material, and determined whether the results were affected by microbiology, antibiotic treatment, or timing of debridement.
145 primary TKAs revised for the first time, due to infection, with debridement and exchange of the tibial insert were identified in the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (37%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (23%). Failure was defined as death before the end of antibiotic treatment, revision of major components due to infection, life-long antibiotic treatment, or chronic infection.
The overall healing rate was 75%. The type of infecting pathogen did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Staphylococcal infections treated without a combination of antibiotics including rifampin had a higher failure rate than those treated with rifampin (RR = 4, 95% CI: 2-10). In the 16 cases with more than 3 weeks of symptoms before treatment, the healing rate was 62%, as compared to 77% in the other cases (p = 0.2). The few patients with a revision model of prosthesis at primary operation had a high failure rate (5 of 8).
Good results can be achieved by open debridement with exchange of tibial insert. It is important to use an antibiotic combination including rifampin in staphylococcal infections.
Notes
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2013 Dec;84(6):509-1624171687
Cites: Infection. 2013 Apr;41(2):431-722987291
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2013 Aug;84(4):380-623848215
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2013 Sep;28(8 Suppl):120-123886410
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Nov;471(11):3672-823904245
Cites: Infection. 2003 Mar;31(2):99-10812682815
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2003 Nov;(416):129-3414646751
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Oct 14;351(16):1645-5415483283
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1981 Jan-Feb;(154):201-77009009
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1993 Feb;75(2):282-98423191
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1993 Dec;75(12):1844-528258558
Cites: JAMA. 1998 May 20;279(19):1537-419605897
Cites: Am J Med. 2006 Nov;119(11):993.e7-1017071171
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2009 Jun;63(6):1264-7119336454
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2010 Oct;25(7):1022-720378306
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Mar;17(3):439-4420412187
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Apr;469(4):970-620544317
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Apr;469(4):961-921080127
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Jun;17(6):862-720825437
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2011 Sep;26(6 Suppl):114-821621955
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Nov;469(11):2992-421938532
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2012 Dec;18(12):1176-8423046277
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;56(1):1-1023230301
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;56(2):182-9422942204
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Jan;471(1):250-722552768
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2013 Jan;57(1):350-523114758
PubMed ID
25753311 View in PubMed
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The 2004 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II--Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181498
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Nadia A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Norman R C Campbell
Ross D Feldman
Simon Rabkin
Jeff Mahon
Richard Lewanczuk
Kelly B Zarnke
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Marcel Lebel
Mitchell Levine
Carol Herbert
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-54
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Societies, Medical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For patients who require pharmacological therapy for hypertension, a number of antihypertensive agents may be used. Randomized trials evaluating first-line therapy with diuretics, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), alpha-blockers, centrally acting agents or angiotensin receptor antagonists were reviewed. Also, randomized trials evaluating other agents, such as statins or acetylsalicylic acid, in patients with hypertension were reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. In addition, other relevant outcomes such as development of end-stage renal disease or changes in blood pressure were examined where appropriate.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2001 to October 2003 to update the 2001 Recommendations for the management of hypertension. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently, using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodology experts.
This document contains detailed recommendations and supporting evidence on treatment thresholds, target blood pressures and choice of agents for hypertensive patients with or without comorbidities. Lifestyle modifications are a key component of any antiatherosclerotic management strategy and detailed recommendations are contained in a separate document. Key recommendations for pharmacotherapy include the following: treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbidities, with particular attention to systolic blood pressure; blood pressure should be lowered to 140/90 mmHg or less in all patients, and 130/80 mmHg or less in those with diabetes mellitus or renal disease (125/75 mmHg or less in those with nondiabetic renal disease and more than 1 g of proteinuria per day); most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve target blood pressures; for adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics; other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), ACE inhibitors (in non-Blacks), long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or angiotensin receptor antagonists; other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or angiotensin receptor antagonists; certain comorbidities provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or thiazides in patients with diabetes mellitus without albuminuria) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with mild to moderate nondiabetic renal disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended; all hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents as per the Recommendations for the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease; and selected patients with hypertension should also receive statin and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Individuals with irreconcilable competing interests (declared by all members, compiled and circulated before the meeting) relative to any specific recommendation were excluded from voting on that recommendation. Only recommendations achieving at least 70% consensus are reported here. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968142 View in PubMed
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Abatacept as add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171770
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2005 Sep;(73):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
C. Allison
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2005 Sep;(73):1-4
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - drug therapy
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Drug Approval
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Immunoconjugates - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Immunologic Factors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Treatment Outcome
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
Abatacept is a co-stimulation blocker that inhibits T-cell activation and interrupts the process leading to inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with severe arthritis who took abatacept with at least one other disease-modifying antirheumatic drug in six and 12-month clinical trials demonstrated statistically significant improvement in tender, swollen joints and other clinical measures compared with placebo. Mild to moderate adverse events included headache, nasopharyngitis, hypertension and back pain. The adverse events were similar to those seen in placebo groups. Abatacept should not be used in combination with other biologic agents because of reported increased rates of serious adverse events, including serious infections. With its different mechanism of action, abatacept may be an alternative add-on therapy for patients with an inadequate response to other arthritis therapies.
PubMed ID
16317826 View in PubMed
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Absence of electroencephalographic seizure activity in patients treated for head injury with an intracranial pressure-targeted therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92263
Source
J Neurosurg. 2009 Feb;110(2):300-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Olivecrona Magnus
Zetterlund Bo
Rodling-Wahlström Marie
Naredi Silvana
Koskinen Lars-Owe D
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. magnus.olivecrona@vll.se
Source
J Neurosurg. 2009 Feb;110(2):300-5
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Conscious Sedation
Drug Therapy, Combination
Electroencephalography - drug effects
Epilepsy, Post-Traumatic - physiopathology - prevention & control
Female
Fentanyl
Frontal Lobe - drug effects - physiopathology
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Intensive Care
Intracranial Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Male
Midazolam
Middle Aged
Parietal Lobe - drug effects - physiopathology
Propofol
Thiopental
Abstract
OBJECT: The authors prospectively studied the occurrence of clinical and nonclinical electroencephalographically verified seizures during treatment with an intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted protocol in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS: All patients treated for TBI at the Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Umeå, Sweden, were eligible for the study. The inclusion was consecutive and based on the availability of the electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring equipment. Patients were included irrespective of pupil size, pupil reaction, or level of consciousness as long as their first measured cerebral perfusion pressure was > 10 mm Hg. The patients were treated in a protocol-guided manner with an ICP-targeted treatment based on the Lund concept. The patients were continuously sedated with midazolam, fentanyl, propofol, or thiopental, or combinations thereof. Five-lead continuous EEG monitoring was performed with the electrodes at F3, F4, P3, P4, and a midline reference. Sensitivity was set at 100 muV per cm and filter settings 0.5-70 Hz. Amplitude-integrated EEG recording and relative band power trends were displayed. The trends were analyzed offline by trained clinical neurophysiologists. RESULTS: Forty-seven patients (mean age 40 years) were studied. Their median Glasgow Coma Scale score at the time of sedation and intubation was 6 (range 3-15). In 8.5% of the patients clinical seizures were observed before sedation and intubation. Continuous EEG monitoring was performed for a total of 7334 hours. During this time neither EEG nor clinical seizures were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our protocol-guided ICP targeted treatment seems to protect patients with severe TBI from clinical and subclinical seizures and thus reduces the risk of secondary brain injury.
PubMed ID
18759609 View in PubMed
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Acanthamoeba keratitis in the south of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51052
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Dec;74(6):593-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
A. Skarin
I. Florén
K. Kiss
H. Miörner
U. Stenevi
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Dec;74(6):593-7
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acanthamoeba - isolation & purification
Acanthamoeba Keratitis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Amebicides - therapeutic use
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antifungal Agents - therapeutic use
Biopsy
Cornea - drug effects - parasitology - pathology
Drug Therapy, Combination - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Eight patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis were diagnosed and treated at our clinic between February 1991 and February 1993. Five of these were contact lens wearers, two had suffered recent corneal trauma and one had recently undergone penetrating keratoplasty. The diagnoses were based on both culture and histological examination of biopsy material in three cases, on culture alone in two cases and on histological examination alone in three cases. In all but one primary treatment was Propamidine isethionate and Neomycin/Polymyxin B topically and Ketoconazole orally. Because of poor healing three patients additionally received Paromomycin and Miconazole or Clotrimazol topically; two of these were further treated with Polyhexamethylene biguanide topically. The interval from initial symptoms to accurate diagnoses varied from one to eleven months. In one patient the eye could not be saved; in the remaining patients visual acuity after healing ranged from hand movements to 1.0.
PubMed ID
9017049 View in PubMed
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1240 records – page 1 of 124.