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60- and 72-month follow-up of children prenatally exposed to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol: cognitive and language assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222648
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P A Fried
C M O'Connell
B. Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Aptitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Development Disorders - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Abstract
Cognitive and receptive language development were examined in 135 60-month-old and 137 72-month-old children for whom prenatal exposure to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol had been ascertained. Discriminant Function analysis revealed an association between prenatal cigarette exposure and lower cognitive and receptive language scores at 60 and 72 months. This paralleled and extended observations made with this sample at annual assessments at 12 to 48 months of age. Unlike observations made at 48 months, prenatal exposure to marijuana was not associated with the cognitive and verbal outcomes. Relatively low levels of maternal alcohol consumption did not have significant relationships with the outcome variables. The importance of assessing subtle components rather than global cognitive and language skills to detect potential behavioral teratogenic effects of the drugs being examined is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):425-81469111
PubMed ID
1469105 View in PubMed
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[A case of the acute hemolytic reaction in the combined treatment with streptomycin and biomycin]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45004
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1966 Mar-Apr;2:30-1
Publication Type
Article

Additive effect of dorzolamide on aqueous humor flow in patients receiving long-term treatment with timolol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10777
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1998 Nov;116(11):1438-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
L L Wayman
L I Larsson
T L Maus
R F Brubaker
Author Affiliation
Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minn., USA.
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1998 Nov;116(11):1438-40
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Aged
Aqueous Humor - secretion
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Fluorophotometry
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - drug therapy - metabolism
Humans
Intraocular Pressure
Male
Middle Aged
Ocular Hypertension - drug therapy - metabolism
Ophthalmic Solutions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sulfonamides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Thiophenes - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Timolol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Tonometry, Ocular
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the additive effect on aqueous humor flow of short-term dorzolamide treatment in patients with glaucoma receiving long-term treatment with timolol. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with glaucoma, 19 at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, and 20 at the University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden, who had been receiving timolol treatment in both eyes for at least 1 year were studied. Aqueous flow was measured with fluorophotometry and intraocular pressure with tonometry. The effect of dorzolamide was compared with placebo when added to the long-term treatment regimen with timolol. RESULTS: Dorzolamide reduced aqueous humor flow by 24% +/- 11% (mean +/- SD). The intraocular pressure as compared with placebo in the US cohort was reduced by 10% +/- 6% and in the Swedish cohort by 18% +/- 9%. CONCLUSIONS: Dorzolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, has additive effects as an ocular hypotensive agent with timolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, even though both drugs are suppressors of aqueous humor flow. Dorzolamide's effect on flow in these patients is the same as reported previously in normal subjects who are not taking a beta-adrenergic antagonist.
PubMed ID
9823342 View in PubMed
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The additive effects of alcohol and benzodiazepines on driving.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138069
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Sep-Oct;101(5):353-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hillary G Maxwell
Sacha Dubois
Bruce Weaver
Michel Bédard
Author Affiliation
St. Joseph's Care Group, Research Department, Thunder Bay, ON. maxwellh@tbh.net
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Sep-Oct;101(5):353-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - blood
Automobile Driving - statistics & numerical data
Benzodiazepines - adverse effects - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Depressants - adverse effects - blood
Drug Synergism
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine the relationship between the combination of alcohol and benzodiazepines and the risk of committing an unsafe driver action.
We used data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (1993-2006) on drivers aged 20 or older who were tested for both alcohol and drugs. Using a case-control design, we compared drivers who had at least one unsafe driver action (UDA; e.g., weaving) recorded in relation to the crash (cases) to drivers who did not (controls).
Drivers who tested positive for intermediate- and long-acting benzodiazepines in combination with alcohol had significantly greater odds of a UDA compared to those under the influence of alcohol alone, up to blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) of 0.08 and 0.05 g/100 ml, respectively. The odds of a UDA with short-acting benzodiazepines combined with alcohol were no different than for alcohol alone.
This study demonstrates that the combination of alcohol and benzodiazepines can have detrimental effects on driving beyond those of alcohol alone. By describing these combined effects in terms of BAC equivalencies, this study also allows for the extrapolation of simple, concrete concepts that communicate risk to the average benzodiazepine user.
PubMed ID
21214047 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 1998 Sep;32(3):351-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
M H Gault
B J Barrett
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St John's Newfoundland.
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 1998 Sep;32(3):351-60
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Analgesics - adverse effects
Aspirin - adverse effects
Caffeine - adverse effects
Canada
Drug Combinations
Drug Synergism
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - chemically induced
Phenacetin - adverse effects
Risk factors
United States
Abstract
Many questions about analgesic nephropathy (AN) lack clear-cut answers. We present available evidence for and against proposed answers to many of these questions. These include: (1) Is acetaminophen (AC) nephrotoxic when taken as the sole analgesic? (2) Is the combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and AC more nephrotoxic than AC taken alone, and if so, why? (3) What are the minimum doses and durations of ingestion required to produce analgesic nephrotoxicity? (4) Is the combination of ASA and AC (a major metabolite of phenacetin) less nephrotoxic than that of phenacetin and ASA combined? (5) Does caffeine in combination with analgesics contribute to nephrotoxicity? (6) What is the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to AN? (7) What uniform diagnostic criteria should be established for AN? (8) What are the earliest anatomic and biochemical abnormalities? (9) What are the mechanisms of renal injury? (10) Does AC cause uroepithelial neoplasia? (11) What research might be most beneficial? Based mainly on associations, some strong, we suggest that AN still exists as a cause of ESRD in the United States, where AC/ASA combinations are available over the counter, and in Canada, where they are not. We also suggest that the evidence needed to recommend that the AC/ASA combination be excluded from over-the-counter analgesic preparations still has limitations. A prospective multicenter study comparing incidence related to AC/ASA in the United States and to AC in Canada and the United States may be needed to answer this question. For such a study to be worthwhile, an adequate incidence in both countries is required.
PubMed ID
9740150 View in PubMed
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[Anesthesiological research in Finland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109911
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Sep 3;66(36):3609-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-3-1969
Author
T. Tammisto
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Sep 3;66(36):3609-15
Date
Sep-3-1969
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia
Antimetabolites
Child, Preschool
Drug Synergism
Finland
Halothane
Humans
Neuroleptanalgesia
Serotonin
PubMed ID
5380921 View in PubMed
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Antioxidants and cancers of the esophagus and gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20316
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2000
Author
P. Terry
J. Lagergren
W. Ye
O. Nyrén
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. paul.terry@mep.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Date
Sep-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cardia - drug effects - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Drug Synergism
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
Antioxidant vitamins have attracted considerable attention in previous studies of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, but dietary studies of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia remain sparse. Treating these tumors as distinct diseases, we studied intakes of vitamin C, beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol in a nationwide population-based case-control study in Sweden, with 185, 165, and 258 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, respectively, and 815 controls. Subjects with a high parallel intake of vitamin C, beta-carotene, and alpha-tocopherol showed a 40-50% decreased risk of both histological types of esophageal cancer compared with subjects with a low parallel intake. Antioxidant intake was not associated with the risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Separately, vitamin C and beta-carotene reduced the risk of esophageal cancers more than alpha-tocopherol. We found that antioxidant intake is associated with similar risk reductions for both main histological types of esophageal cancer. Our findings indicate that antioxidants do not explain the diverging incidence rates of the 2 histological types of esophageal cancer. Moreover, our data suggest that inverse associations with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma may be stronger among subjects under presumed higher oxidative stress due to smoking or gastroesophageal reflux, respectively. Our results may be relevant for the implementation of focused, cost-effective preventive measures.
PubMed ID
10925371 View in PubMed
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Antiprogestin drugs: research and clinical use in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224920
Source
Law Med Health Care. 1992;20(3):157-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. Bygdeman
M L Swahn
Source
Law Med Health Care. 1992;20(3):157-60
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Steroidal
Carboprost - administration & dosage
Contraceptives, Oral, Synthetic
Drug Synergism
Female
Humans
Mifepristone - administration & dosage
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prostaglandins E, Synthetic - administration & dosage
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish experience indicates that the combination of RU 486 and vaginal or intramuscular administration of different prostaglandin analogues such as Cervagem, Sulprostone, and 15- methyl PGF2 alpha is a highly effective and safe non-surgical method to terminate early pregnancy. The combined treatment may also be used during the second trimester. In mid- and late second trimester abortion this procedure represents a simple, non-invasive, highly effective method. There are several possibilities by which RU 486 can be used as a contraceptive. We have shown that post-ovulatory administration of RU 486 will effectively inhibit implantation. If the preliminary results are confirmed, treatment with RU 486 once a month on day LH+2 may be an attractive alternative to present contraceptive technology.
PubMed ID
1434756 View in PubMed
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Antitumor and antimetastatic activity of fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide isolated from the Okhotsk Sea Fucus evanescens brown alga.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87782
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2007 Jun;143(6):730-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Alekseyenko T V
Zhanayeva S Ya
Venediktova A A
Zvyagintseva T N
Kuznetsova T A
Besednova N N
Korolenko T A
Author Affiliation
Institute of Physiology, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2007 Jun;143(6):730-2
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic - therapeutic use
Cathepsin B - metabolism
Cyclophosphamide - therapeutic use
Cysteine Endopeptidases - metabolism
Drug Synergism
Fucus - chemistry
Lung Neoplasms - secondary
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Neoplasm Metastasis - drug therapy
Neoplasm Transplantation
Neoplasms, Experimental - enzymology
Polysaccharides - therapeutic use
Sulfuric Acid Esters - therapeutic use
Cathepsins - metabolism
Cathepsin D - metabolism
Abstract
Antitumor and antimetastatic activities of fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide isolated from Fucus evanescens (brown alga in Okhotsk sea), was studied in C57Bl/6 mice with transplanted Lewis lung adenocarcinoma. Fucoidan after single and repeated administration in a dose of 10 mg/kg produced moderate antitumor and antimetastatic effects and potentiated the antimetastatic, but not antitumor activities of cyclophosphamide. Fucoidan in a dose of 25 mg/kg potentiated the toxic effect of cyclophosphamide.
PubMed ID
18239813 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.