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A 6-month prospective study of hospital-acquired bacteremia in Copenhagen county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34967
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(6):601-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A G Jensen
A. Kirstein
I. Jensen
J. Scheibel
F. Espersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Herlev University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(6):601-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Cross Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Abstract
During a 6-month period, 892 positive blood cultures were detected in the Copenhagen County hospitals. 302 (34%) were regarded as contaminations, and of the remaining cases 419 (71%) were community-acquired and 171 (29%) hospital-acquired, giving incidence rates of 6.8/1,000 admissions and 2.8/1,000 admissions, respectively. Both frequency and rate of hospital-acquired bacteremia were lower compared to most other studies. E. coli was more commonly found in community-acquired infections, while coagulase-negative staphylococci were the organisms most often considered as a contaminant. The main causative organisms in hospital-acquired infections were S. aureus (n = 37) and E. coli (n = 34). The proportion of polymicrobial bacteremias in this study was lower compared to most other studies (8%). E. coli from hospital-acquired infections were resistant to ampicillin in 42% of cases, but other Enterobacteriaceae showed higher percentage of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. S. aureus was penicillin-resistant in 92% of cases, but no methicillin-resistant strains were isolated. The frequency of antibiotic resistance was low compared to reports from other countries. A total of 136 hospital-acquired cases were followed prospectively. 61% of the patients were male and 46% were > or = 60 years of age. Most patients had predisposing diseases, 90% had foreign body and/or recent surgery performed, and 74 (54%) had an intraveneous catheter. The portal of entry was known in 132 (97%) of the cases, the most common being the urinary tract (42%), followed by an intravenous catheter (30%). The prevalence of urinary tract catheters gave an increased number of cases with E. coli bacteremia. The mortality was 16%.
PubMed ID
9060064 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of the Salmonella typhi strains isolated from patients and bacterial carriers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70360
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
L E Riabchenko
L A Riapis
L M Sladkova
E I Vostrova
Iu V Kravtsov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Date
Dec-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Bacteriophage Typing
Carrier State - microbiology
Comparative Study
Drug Resistance, Microbial
English Abstract
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Weight
Plasmids - genetics
Salmonella typhi - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Typhoid Fever - microbiology
Ukraine
Virulence
Abstract
The comparative analysis of 133 S. typhi clinical strains isolated from patients and carriers in Dnepropetrovsk Province in 1978-1987 was carried out. As shown by this analysis, 10 Vi phage types were represented in the set of strains under study, phage types A and F1 being the most numerous ones. Phage type F1 occurred less frequently among the strains isolated from carriers. 31.1% of the strains were found to contain plasmids with different molecular weight ranging from 96 to 0.5 MD. The occurrence of plasmid-containing strains remained at the same level during the whole period under study. Low-molecular plasmids occurred more frequently in the strains isolated from carriers. The minimal suppressive concentrations of a number of antibiotics, such as penicillin, ampicillin, monomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin and streptomycin, were determined. 7% of the strains were resistant to penicillin, 9% to monomycin, 15%--to tetracycline and 2.6% to chloramphenicol. The correlation between penicillin and monomycin resistance of the strains and the presence of the plasmid with a molecular weight of 60 MD in these strains was established. All strains were shown to be highly variable in the degree of their virulence: from 10(2) to 10(8). The strains isolated from patients possessed greater virulence.
PubMed ID
2629429 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the biological properties of Biosporin and other commercial Bacillus-based preparations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75583
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1997 Nov-Dec;59(6):43-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
I B Sorokulova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1997 Nov-Dec;59(6):43-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibiosis - drug effects
Bacillus cereus
Bacillus subtilis
Bacteria - drug effects
Biological Factors - pharmacology - toxicity
Candida - drug effects
Comparative Study
Drug Resistance, Microbial
English Abstract
Humans
Mice
Probiotics - pharmacology - toxicity
Abstract
A new probiotic Biosporin and other commercial biopreparations based on aerobic sporulating bacteria of the Bacillus genus have been comparatively studied for their specific activity and safety. It has been established that only Biosporin is characterized by expressed antagonistic activity in respect to a wide range of pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microorganisms including those with multiple resistance to antibiotics. Biosporin is also characterized by the absence of any negative action on the organism of animals even in the doses considerably exceeding those recommended for use.
PubMed ID
9511375 View in PubMed
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Activity of macrolides, lincosamines, streptogramins and fluoroquinolones against streptococcus pneumoniae and enterococci isolates from the western hemisphere: example of international surveillance (SENTRY antimicrobial surveillance program )in the development of new drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198751
Source
Braz J Infect Dis. 2000 Feb;4(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
M T Lewis
R N Jones
Author Affiliation
Medical Microbiology Division, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.
Source
Braz J Infect Dis. 2000 Feb;4(1):15-21
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Sugars - pharmacology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Canada
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterococcus - drug effects
Fluoroquinolones
Humans
Latin America
Macrolides
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Sentinel Surveillance
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects
United States
Virginiamycin - pharmacology
Abstract
Resistance among commonly isolated Gram-positive cocci have compromised the available therapeutic regimens and require structured monitoring at the local, regional, national, and international levels. Two popular treatment classes of antimicrobials (macrolides-lincosamines-streptogramins [MLS], fluoroquinolones) have been tested against 3, 049 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and enterococci from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance program. The strains were obtained from clinical cases in hospitals in the United States, Canada, and six nations (10 medical centers )in Latin America. MLS and fluoroquinolone compounds had moderate activity against vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis only (gatifloxacin, and trovafloxacin MIC(50), 0.5 microg/ml), and quinupristin/dalfopristin was potent only against E.faecium isolates (MIC(90), 1 microg/ml(-2) microg/ml). When tested against pneumococci, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin, sparfloxacin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin (MIC(90), or =99.8% and 84.7% to 99.1% of strains, respectively. These results from a global resistance monitoring program should encourage rapid drug development. Based on in vitro sensitivity testing, they indicate a promising role for the treatment of emerging resistant Gram-positive cocci. The clinical role for each new agent will depend on safety profiles, rates of administration, and other issues identified during development in the clinical trials process.
PubMed ID
10788841 View in PubMed
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Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2011;56(3-4):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
K P Gruver
V B Beloborodov
T N Kuz'menko
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2011;56(3-4):35-40
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Carbapenems - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cephalosporins - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterobacteriaceae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Female
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - blood - complications - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - blood - complications - microbiology
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Oxazolidinones - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Sepsis - drug therapy - etiology
Vancomycin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Cases of sepsis with bacteriemia detected in the S. P. Botkin State Clinical Hospital within 2000-2007 were analysed. The sources of the bacteriemia, the etiological pattern of the pathogens and their susceptibility to antibacterials were estimated. The study enrolled 256 patients with sepsis. The antibiotic susceptibility of 227 isolates from the blood samples was tested. More than a half of the infection sources was detected in the organs of the respiratory tract and abdominal cavity. All the grampositive pathogens were susceptible to vancomycin and linesolid. The overwhelming majority of the enterococcal isolates proved to be susceptible to carbapenem and cefepim.
PubMed ID
21913407 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media in Sweden. Role of Branhamella catarrhalis and the rationale for choice of antimicrobial therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39369
Source
Drugs. 1986;31 Suppl 3:125-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
K. Lundgren
L. Ingvarsson
Source
Drugs. 1986;31 Suppl 3:125-31
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Exudates and Transudates - microbiology
Humans
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Neisseriaceae - enzymology
Otitis Media - drug therapy - microbiology
Recurrence
Sweden
beta-Lactamases - metabolism
Abstract
The occurrence of Branhamella catarrhalis in the nasopharynx and middle ear exudate was investigated in 3 studies. Bacteria were isolated from the nasopharynx in 63% of 180 healthy children and B. catarrhalis, the most common bacterium present, was isolated in 36%. In 75 children with primary acute otitis media, bacteria were isolated from the nasopharynx in 98% and from the middle ear exudate in 80%. B. catarrhalis was found in the nasopharynx in 43% and in the middle ear exudate in pure culture in 9%. In those children in whom B. catarrhalis was isolated from the middle ear exudate it was also present in the nasopharynx. In 420 children, 338 with primary acute otitis media and 82 who relapsed or did not respond to previous antibiotic therapy, B. catarrhalis was isolated from the nasopharynx in approximately 50%. About half of the B. catarrhalis strains were beta-lactamase-producing and the majority of these strains were isolated in children under 3 years of age. Of children with primary acute otitis media who had beta-lactamase-producing B. catarrhalis about 50% had not previously received antibiotic treatment. B. catarrhalis is commonly found in the nasopharynx of healthy children as well as in children with acute otitis media. Many of the strains are beta-lactamase-producing though many of the children have not been previously treated with antibiotics. In middle ear exudate, B. catarrhalis is found in about 10% of cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3488192 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation of Sonne and Flexner dysentery bacteria to antibiotics and some biological properties of adapted subcultures]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13592
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1967 May-Jun;29(3):250-5
Publication Type
Article

[Aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci a new bacterial hazard].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202302
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 7;96(14):1694-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-1999
Author
A. Melhus
Author Affiliation
Kliniskt mikrobiologiska laboratoriet, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö. asa.melhus@mikrobiol.mas.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 7;96(14):1694-5
Date
Apr-7-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aminoglycosides
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Cross Infection - drug therapy - microbiology - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Enterococcus - drug effects - genetics - pathogenicity
Enterococcus faecalis - drug effects - genetics - pathogenicity
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infection Control
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
Enterococci are common causative agents in a broad range of human infections. Although formerly considered to be of low virulence, in recent years they have emerged as important pathogens, particularly in the hospital environment. Enterococci are not only intrinsically resistant to several antibiotics, but are also characterised by a potent and unique ability to exchange genetic material. With the increasing prevalence of strains resistant to ampicillin, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides, serious therapeutic difficulties have become more common. Epidemiological aspects, the mechanisms of action, the detection of antibiotic resistance, and the situation of enterococci in Sweden are discussed in the article.
PubMed ID
10222683 View in PubMed
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587 records – page 1 of 59.