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625 records – page 1 of 63.

A 1-year follow-up of prescribing patterns of analgesics in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224422
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 1992 Feb;17(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
R. Ahonen
H. Enlund
V. Pakarinen
S. Riihimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 1992 Feb;17(1):43-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analgesics
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - trends
Abstract
The prescription of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs (analgesics) was studied using computerized patient records from a Finnish health centre with a population base of some 27,000 inhabitants. A random sample of every fifth patient visiting the health centre in 1986 was chosen. This study sample consisted of 4,577 patients with 17,021 physician contacts and altogether 14,035 prescriptions during the 1-year follow-up: of these analgesics comprised 14.8%. The proportion of the study population who received at least one analgesic prescription was 23 +/- 1.2% (95% CI). The use of physician contacts as a base revealed 10.7 +/- 0.5% (95% CI) of the contacts with an analgesic prescription. The exposure to analgesics among males increased with age from 17% for those aged 15-34 years to 34% for those aged 75 years or more. Among women, exposure to analgesics increased from 17% (15-34 years) to 41% (75 years or more). Most of patients who received analgesic prescriptions were incidental users (one or two analgesic prescriptions per year). Only 4% of women and 3% of men were categorized as heavy users of analgesics (seven or more analgesic prescriptions per year). The proportion of heavy users increased with age and was highest in the oldest age-group (75 years or more). In order to make informed policy judgements about drug use in society, we need routine sales statistics and patient-specific drug-use data such as those presented in this paper.
PubMed ID
1548311 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of users of benzodiazepine: starting with diazepam versus oxazepam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282849
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2016 Apr;66(645):e241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ingunn Fride Tvete
Trine Bjørner
Tor Skomedal
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2016 Apr;66(645):e241-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diazepam - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oxazepam - therapeutic use
Prescription Drug Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Drug dependency may develop during long-term benzodiazepine use, indicated, for example, by dose escalation. The first benzodiazepine chosen may affect the risk of dose escalation.
To detect possible differences in benzodiazepine use between new users of diazepam and oxazepam over time.
This 5-year prescription database study included 19 747 new benzodiazepine users, inhabitants of Norway, aged 30-60 years, with first redemption for diazepam or oxazepam.
Individuals starting on diazepam versus oxazepam were analysed by logistic regression with sex, age, other drug redemptions, prescriber's specialty, household income, education level, type of work, and vocational rehabilitation support as background variables. Time to reach a daily average intake of =1 defined daily doses (DDD) over a 3-month period was analysed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model.
New users of oxazepam had a higher risk for dose escalation compared with new users of diazepam. This was true even when accounting for differences in sociodemographic status and previous drug use (hazard ratio [HR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval = 1.17 to 1.51).
Most doctors prescribed, according to recommendations, oxazepam to individuals they may have regarded as prone to and at risk of dependency. However, these individuals were at higher risk for dose escalation even when accounting for differences in sociodemographic status and previous drug use. Differences between the two user groups could be explained by different preferences for starting drug, DDD for oxazepam being possibly too low, and some unaccounted differences in illness.
Notes
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Cites: BMJ Open. 2013 Oct 04;3(10):e00329624097305
Cites: Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1997 Nov;134(1):1-379399364
Cites: Eur Addict Res. 2006;12(3):145-5016778435
Cites: J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1984 May;229(2):501-86716272
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Cites: CNS Drugs. 2004;18(1):37-4814731058
Cites: Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1984;84(2):147-546438672
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Oct;59(7):559-6312942224
Cites: Addiction. 2011 Dec;106(12):2086-10921714826
PubMed ID
26965028 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of Canadian health administrative databases in identifying patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a validation study using the medical records of rheumatologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114676
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jessica Widdifield
Sasha Bernatsky
J Michael Paterson
Karen Tu
Ryan Ng
J Carter Thorne
Janet E Pope
Claire Bombardier
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology
Data Mining - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Fees and Charges - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatology - statistics & numerical data
Single-Payer System - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Health administrative data can be a valuable tool for disease surveillance and research. Few studies have rigorously evaluated the accuracy of administrative databases for identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Our aim was to validate administrative data algorithms to identify RA patients in Ontario, Canada.
We performed a retrospective review of a random sample of 450 patients from 18 rheumatology clinics. Using rheumatologist-reported diagnosis as the reference standard, we tested and validated different combinations of physician billing, hospitalization, and pharmacy data.
One hundred forty-nine rheumatology patients were classified as having RA and 301 were classified as not having RA based on our reference standard definition (study RA prevalence 33%). Overall, algorithms that included physician billings had excellent sensitivity (range 94-100%). Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) were modest to excellent and increased when algorithms included multiple physician claims or specialist claims. The addition of RA medications did not significantly improve algorithm performance. The algorithm of "(1 hospitalization RA code ever) OR (3 physician RA diagnosis codes [claims] with =1 by a specialist in a 2-year period)" had a sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 85%, PPV of 76%, and negative predictive value of 98%. Most RA patients (84%) had an RA diagnosis code present in the administrative data within ±1 year of a rheumatologist's documented diagnosis date.
We demonstrated that administrative data can be used to identify RA patients with a high degree of accuracy. RA diagnosis date and disease duration are fairly well estimated from administrative data in jurisdictions of universal health care insurance.
PubMed ID
23592598 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of pharmaceutical treatment of schizophrenia in Quebec varies with age, but is not influenced by sex or neighbourhood deprivation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107816
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;58(8):456-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Frederieke M Brouwers
Josiane Courteau
Jean-Pierre Grégoire
Jocelyne Moisan
Sophie Lauzier
Alain Lesage
Marie-Josée Fleury
Alain Vanasse
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;58(8):456-65
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Though high discontinuation rates for antipsychotics (APs) by patients with schizophrenia are frequently reported, the percentage of patients receiving pharmaceutical treatment for schizophrenia in routine practice in accordance with international clinical guidelines is unknown. Further, it is unknown if these rates are influenced by levels of neighbourhood deprivation or by a patient's age or sex. Our study aims to investigate if inequalities in AP treatment could be observed between patients living in neighbourhoods with the highest levels of material and social deprivation and those with the lowest deprivation levels, between patients from different age groups, or between men and women.
We conducted a secondary analysis of medical-administrative data of a cohort of adult patients in the province of Quebec with a medical contact for schizophrenia in a 2-year period (2004-2005). We assessed the proportion of patients that filled at least 1 prescription for an AP and received adequate pharmaceutical treatment, defined as being in possession of APs at least 80% of the time as outpatients during a 2-year follow-up period.
Among the 30 544 study patients, 88.5% filled at least 1 prescription for an AP, and 67.5% of the treated patients received adequate treatment. Though no clinically significant differences were observed by deprivation or sex, younger age was associated with lower proportions of patients receiving adequate treatment (46% of treated patients aged between 18 and 29 years, compared with 72% aged between 30 and 64 years, and 77% aged 65 years and over).
In Quebec's routine practice, over 70% of treated patients aged 30 and over received adequate pharmacological treatment, regardless of sex or neighbourhood socioeconomic status. In contrast, in patients aged between 18 and 29 years this percentage was 47%. This is a discouraging finding, especially because optimal treatment in the early phase of disease is reported to result in the best long-term outcomes.
PubMed ID
23972107 View in PubMed
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Adherence to guidelines on antibiotic treatment for respiratory tract infections in various categories of physicians: a retrospective cross-sectional study of data from electronic patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271494
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
David Tell
Sven Engström
Sigvard Mölstad
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To study how prescription patterns concerning respiratory tract infections differ between interns, residents, younger general practitioners (GPs), older GPs and locums.
Retrospective study of structured data from electronic patient records.
Data were obtained from 53 health centres and 3 out-of-hours units in Jönköping County, Sweden, through their common electronic medical record database.
All physicians working in primary care during the 2-year study period (1 November 2010 to 31 October 2012).
Physicians' adherence to current guidelines for respiratory tract infections regarding the use of antibiotics.
We found considerable differences in prescribing patterns between physician categories. The recommended antibiotic, phenoxymethylpenicillin, was more often prescribed by interns, residents and younger GPs, while older GPs and locums to a higher degree prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. The greatest differences were seen when the recommendation in guidelines was to refrain from antibiotics, as for acute bronchitis. Interns and residents most often followed guidelines, while compliance in descending order was: young GPs, older GPs and locums. We also noticed that male doctors were somewhat overall more restrictive with antibiotics than female doctors.
In general, primary care doctors followed national guidelines on choice of antibiotics when treating respiratory tract infections in children but to a lesser degree when treating adults. Refraining from antibiotics seems harder. Adherence to national guidelines could be improved, especially for acute bronchitis and pneumonia. This was especially true for older GPs and locums whose prescription patterns were distant from the prevailing guidelines.
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;8(3):278-8211927025
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(5):366-7112069022
Cites: South Med J. 2001 Apr;94(4):365-911332898
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Jun;47:1217-2411421050
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2012 Apr;18(2):473-8421210896
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2011 Dec;66 Suppl 6:vi3-1222096064
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2009;27(4):208-1519929185
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Nov;14(11):1722-3018976555
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2008 Feb;8(2):125-3218222163
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2008 Jan;77(1):50-717185030
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2006 Sep;56(530):680-516954000
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1982 Jul;15(1):111-77086372
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(2):139-4315061670
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2004 Jan;9(1):30-414762318
Cites: Lakartidningen. 2013 Apr 3-16;110(27-28):1282-423951882
PubMed ID
26179648 View in PubMed
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Adherence to statins, beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors following a first cardiovascular event: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174577
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 May 1;21(6):485-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2005
Author
David F Blackburn
Roy T Dobson
James L Blackburn
Thomas W Wilson
Mary Rose Stang
William M Semchuk
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. d.blackburn@usask.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 May 1;21(6):485-8
Date
May-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Angina, Unstable - drug therapy
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass
Databases as Topic
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Saskatchewan
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
Population studies of statin adherence are generally restricted to one to two years of follow-up and do not analyze adherence to other drugs.
To report long-term adherence rates for statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta-blockers in patients who recently experienced a first cardiovascular event.
Linked administrative databases in the province of Saskatchewan were used in this retrospective cohort study. Eligible patients received a new statin prescription within one year of their first cardiovascular event between 1994 and 2001. Adherence to statins, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors was assessed from the first statin prescription to a subsequent cardiovascular event.
Of 1221 eligible patients, the proportion of patients adherent to statin medications dropped to 60.3% at one year and 48.8% at five years. The decline in the proportion of adherent patients was most notable during the first two years (100% to 53.7%). Several factors were associated with statin adherence, including age (P = 0.012), number of physician service days (P = 0.037), chronic disease score (P = 0.032), beta-blocker adherence (P
PubMed ID
15917876 View in PubMed
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Adherence to treatment of primary osteoporosis and its association to fractures--the Swedish Adherence Register Analysis (SARA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137397
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2012 Feb;23(2):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
E. Landfeldt
O. Ström
S. Robbins
F. Borgström
Author Affiliation
i3 Innovus, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2012 Feb;23(2):433-43
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density Conservation Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Osteoporosis treatments reduce the risk of fractures. The objective of this study was to investigate adherence to treatment of osteoporosis and its association to fractures in Sweden. Adherence to treatment of osteoporosis in Sweden is poor, and time on treatment was found to be significantly associated with fracture incidence.
The objective of this study was to estimate persistence and compliance to treatment of primary osteoporosis in Sweden. A second aim was to investigate the determinants of non-persistence and the association between adherence and fracture incidence.
Patients were identified through filled prescriptions for alendronate, risedronate, strontium ranelate, and raloxifene between 2005 and 2009 from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Persistence was investigated using survival analysis. Medication possession ratio (MPR) was used to measure compliance in persistent patients. The outcome measure in the analysis of adherence and fracture incidence was hospitalized osteoporotic fractures.
The final cohort consisted of 56,586 treatment-na?ve patients (mean age 71, 86% women). A total of 51%, 35%, 25%, and 14% were still on treatment (switching allowed) after 1, 2, 3, and 4 years, respectively. Average MPR in persistent patients was 94.2% (CI(95) 94.2-94.3%). Compared with
PubMed ID
21286686 View in PubMed
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Adherence to warfarin treatment among patients with atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265594
Source
Clin Res Cardiol. 2014 Dec;103(12):998-1005
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Mika Skeppholm
Leif Friberg
Source
Clin Res Cardiol. 2014 Dec;103(12):998-1005
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - therapy
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Warfarin - administration & dosage
Abstract
Treatment with warfarin greatly reduces the risk of stroke related to atrial fibrillation, but will not be effective unless patients adhere to treatment. Lack of fixed dosing makes it difficult to objectively estimate adherence to treatment from prescription data.
To evaluate two methods that assess adherence to warfarin from prescription data.
Retrospective study of Swedish health care registers.
Age- and sex-specific dose requirements were determined from approx. 1 million blood tests and dosing instructions. By applying these dosages to 163,785 warfarin-treated patients with atrial fibrillation, we calculated the quantity of warfarin that was needed to keep these patients on effective treatment during a mean follow-up of 3.9 years and compared that with the dispensed quantities. The ratio of available drug/time at risk constitutes a measure of adherence on group level. In addition, time intervals between refills were used to assess discontinuation.
Both methods showed that 45% of the patients did not have enough warfarin to last 80% of the time at risk. Between 16 and 21% of the patients discontinued within the first year, followed by 8-9% annually during the following years. Patients with high bleeding risk and patients with low embolic risk showed lower endurance.
Adherence to treatment with warfarin can be estimated on group level from prescription data and may be useful for comparison of adherence with warfarin and new oral anticoagulants. When applied to a large warfarin-treated cohort with atrial fibrillation, we found that adherence is low and that measures aiming for improvements are needed .
PubMed ID
25080281 View in PubMed
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Agreement between self-reported and pharmacy data on medication use in the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145028
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Marianne Haapea
Jouko Miettunen
Sari Lindeman
Matti Joukamaa
Hannu Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. marianne.haapea@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare self-reported (SR) medication use and pharmacy data for major psychoactive medications and three classes of medications used for different indications, and to determine the socio-economic factors associated with the congruence.
Postal questionnaire data collected in 1997 were compared with the register of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland on the reimbursed prescriptions purchased during 1997. Altogether 7625 subjects were included in this study. Drugs were categorized according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) system.
Kappa values were 0.77, 0.68, 0.84, 0.92 and 0.55 for antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiepileptics, antidiabetics and beta-blocking agents, respectively. Prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa values were almost perfect (0.98-1.00). Reliability of antipsychotics use was better for married subjects than for those who were not married; and of antidepressants use for highly educated and married subjects than for those who were less educated and were not married. Altogether 414 (5.4%) responders and 285 (7.1%) non-responders had used at least one of the selected medications.
Agreement between the SR and pharmacy data was moderate for psychoactive medication use. Even though data collected by postal questionnaire may underestimate the prevalence of medication use due to non-participation it can be assumed accurate enough for study purposes.
PubMed ID
20209650 View in PubMed
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An examination of the effect of cytochrome P450 drug interactions of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on health care utilization: a Canadian population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186698
Source
Clin Ther. 2002 Dec;24(12):2126-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Thomas R Einarson
Colleen J Metge
Michael Iskedjian
Jayanti Mukherjee
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. t.einarson@utoronto.ca
Source
Clin Ther. 2002 Dec;24(12):2126-36
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticholesteremic Agents - adverse effects - economics
Canada - epidemiology
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - antagonists & inhibitors
Drug Interactions
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects - economics
Manitoba - epidemiology
Population
Resource Allocation
Abstract
Cytochrome P450-related drug interactions can lead to adverse effects that may affect health care resource utilization.
The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of drug interactions involving hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) on health care resource utilization.
Using the Manitoba Health Research database, we identified patients who had used statins between January 1, 1995, and March 31, 1998. New statin users (NSUs) were those who received a first prescription for a statin after April 30, 1995; old statin users (OSUs) were those who had a statin prescription before January 1, 1995. The number of hospitalizations, physician visits, and prescriptions, and their associated costs to the Manitoba health care system were calculated. Statin interacters were defined as users with >1 prescription for an interacting drug while receiving a statin. Interacting drugs were classified into 2 groups: group A included drugs whose levels increased as a result of the statin prescription; drugs in group B increased statin levels. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to analyze differences by statin on health care resource use.
A total of 28,705 statin users (18, 181 NSUs and 10,524 OSUs) were identified. During the study period, 24,496 (85.3%) individuals took 1 statin, 3751 (13.1%) took 2 statins, and 458 (1.6%) took 3 to 5 statins. The most common coadministered group A interacting drugs were diclofenac (5.8%), amitriptyline (4.9%), warfarin (4.5%), and ibuprofen (1.8%). The most common group B interacting drugs were erythromycin (8.2%), omeprazole (5.5%), cimetidine (3.6%), and clarithromycin (3.5%). Statin interacters consumed significantly more health care resources than did noninteracters for both incident and prevalent analyses (P
Notes
Erratum In: Clin Ther. 2003 Dec;25(12):3190
PubMed ID
12581550 View in PubMed
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625 records – page 1 of 63.