Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1734 records – page 1 of 174.

A 1-year follow-up of prescribing patterns of analgesics in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224422
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 1992 Feb;17(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
R. Ahonen
H. Enlund
V. Pakarinen
S. Riihimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 1992 Feb;17(1):43-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analgesics
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - trends
Abstract
The prescription of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs (analgesics) was studied using computerized patient records from a Finnish health centre with a population base of some 27,000 inhabitants. A random sample of every fifth patient visiting the health centre in 1986 was chosen. This study sample consisted of 4,577 patients with 17,021 physician contacts and altogether 14,035 prescriptions during the 1-year follow-up: of these analgesics comprised 14.8%. The proportion of the study population who received at least one analgesic prescription was 23 +/- 1.2% (95% CI). The use of physician contacts as a base revealed 10.7 +/- 0.5% (95% CI) of the contacts with an analgesic prescription. The exposure to analgesics among males increased with age from 17% for those aged 15-34 years to 34% for those aged 75 years or more. Among women, exposure to analgesics increased from 17% (15-34 years) to 41% (75 years or more). Most of patients who received analgesic prescriptions were incidental users (one or two analgesic prescriptions per year). Only 4% of women and 3% of men were categorized as heavy users of analgesics (seven or more analgesic prescriptions per year). The proportion of heavy users increased with age and was highest in the oldest age-group (75 years or more). In order to make informed policy judgements about drug use in society, we need routine sales statistics and patient-specific drug-use data such as those presented in this paper.
PubMed ID
1548311 View in PubMed
Less detail

[3 physicians' prescriptions for narcotics criticized].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109253
Source
Lakartidningen. 1970 Dec 16;67(51):6014-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1970
Source
Lakartidningen. 1970 Dec 16;67(51):6014-5
Date
Dec-16-1970
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Prescriptions
Drug and Narcotic Control
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Narcotics
Substance-Related Disorders
Sweden
PubMed ID
5494327 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year follow-up study of users of benzodiazepine: starting with diazepam versus oxazepam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282849
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2016 Apr;66(645):e241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ingunn Fride Tvete
Trine Bjørner
Tor Skomedal
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2016 Apr;66(645):e241-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diazepam - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oxazepam - therapeutic use
Prescription Drug Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Drug dependency may develop during long-term benzodiazepine use, indicated, for example, by dose escalation. The first benzodiazepine chosen may affect the risk of dose escalation.
To detect possible differences in benzodiazepine use between new users of diazepam and oxazepam over time.
This 5-year prescription database study included 19 747 new benzodiazepine users, inhabitants of Norway, aged 30-60 years, with first redemption for diazepam or oxazepam.
Individuals starting on diazepam versus oxazepam were analysed by logistic regression with sex, age, other drug redemptions, prescriber's specialty, household income, education level, type of work, and vocational rehabilitation support as background variables. Time to reach a daily average intake of =1 defined daily doses (DDD) over a 3-month period was analysed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model.
New users of oxazepam had a higher risk for dose escalation compared with new users of diazepam. This was true even when accounting for differences in sociodemographic status and previous drug use (hazard ratio [HR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval = 1.17 to 1.51).
Most doctors prescribed, according to recommendations, oxazepam to individuals they may have regarded as prone to and at risk of dependency. However, these individuals were at higher risk for dose escalation even when accounting for differences in sociodemographic status and previous drug use. Differences between the two user groups could be explained by different preferences for starting drug, DDD for oxazepam being possibly too low, and some unaccounted differences in illness.
Notes
Cites: Expert Rev Neurother. 2008 Aug;8(8):1189-9118671662
Cites: BMJ Open. 2013 Oct 04;3(10):e00329624097305
Cites: Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1997 Nov;134(1):1-379399364
Cites: Eur Addict Res. 2006;12(3):145-5016778435
Cites: J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1984 May;229(2):501-86716272
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(4):252-926683285
Cites: CNS Drugs. 2004;18(1):37-4814731058
Cites: Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1984;84(2):147-546438672
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Oct;59(7):559-6312942224
Cites: Addiction. 2011 Dec;106(12):2086-10921714826
PubMed ID
26965028 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abramson: direct-to-consumer advertising will erode health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157621
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):1126-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-2008
Author
Ann Silversides
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):1126-7
Date
Apr-22-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic
Canada
Drug Industry
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations
PubMed ID
18427081 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abuse of doping preparations outside organized sports. A new challenge for health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218841
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):424-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1994
Author
E. Haug
Author Affiliation
Hormonlaboratoriet Aker sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):424-5
Date
Feb-10-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anabolic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Doping in Sports
Drug Prescriptions
Drug and Narcotic Control
Growth Hormone - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Norway
Physician's Role
Risk factors
PubMed ID
8009474 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Aug 21;157(34):4681-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-1995
Author
J. Højsted
J. Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Tvaerfagligt smertecenter, Bispebjerg Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Aug 21;157(34):4681-2
Date
Aug-21-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Male
Methadone - administration & dosage
Munchausen Syndrome - diagnosis - psychology
Opioid-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
A 75 year-old man with a well known opioid abuse is described. Within the last 10 years the patient had 161 acute admissions to hospital--in total 942 in-hospital days. The diagnoses were either angina pectoris, low back pain or migraine. With time, the patient had become very skilled in mimicking these three diseases, knowing all subjective and objective signs even better than most of his doctors. In connection with all admissions he received the opioids he wanted. Nevertheless, he was astonished that it was so easy to fool the doctors. It is recommended that the patients' own doctor should be the coordinator and the only person responsible for prescription of opioids to these patients. In case of admissions to hospital, this should only be possible to a few selected departments who know the patient.
PubMed ID
7645115 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to the morning-after pill in BC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198163
Source
CMAJ. 2000 May 30;162(11):1554
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-2000
Author
W D Gutowski
Source
CMAJ. 2000 May 30;162(11):1554
Date
May-30-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Contraceptives, Postcoital
Drug Prescriptions
Ethics
Humans
Pharmacists
Notes
Cites: Am J Nephrol. 1991;11(2):131-71951474
Cites: J Clin Pharmacol. 1992 Mar;32(3):277-831564133
Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 1999 Sep;13(9):569-9210482967
Cites: Kidney Int. 1992 Apr;41(4):912-91325010
Cites: Kidney Int. 1992 Aug;42(2):452-81405330
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Nov 11;329(20):1456-628413456
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1995 May 22;155(10):1073-807748051
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1996 Jan;27(1):34-418546136
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Jan 25;162(2):195-810674051
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):876-710750481
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1977 Jan-Feb;92(1):72-8189344
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1984 Feb;100(2):258-686362512
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1985;21(10):1063-93936186
Cites: J Health Econ. 1989 Mar;8(1):109-3210293367
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Oct 10;335(15):1107-148813041
Cites: J Clin Pharmacol. 1996 Aug;36(8):674-828877670
Cites: Kidney Int. 1996 Nov;50(5):1641-508914031
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 1997 May;8(5):793-89176849
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 Nov;12(11):2244-509394306
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Jun 13;351(9118):1755-629635947
Cites: Kidney Int. 1998 Oct;54(4):1283-99767545
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Jan 12;160(1):31-79934341
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Jan 12;160(1):41-69934342
Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):26110951720
Comment On: CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):876-710750481
PubMed ID
10862225 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to the morning-after pill in BC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198164
Source
CMAJ. 2000 May 30;162(11):1554
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-2000
Author
B. Osmond
Source
CMAJ. 2000 May 30;162(11):1554
Date
May-30-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Contraceptives, Postcoital
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Legislation, Pharmacy
Pharmacists
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1985;21(10):1063-93936186
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Jan 25;162(2):195-810674051
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):876-710750481
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1977 Jan-Feb;92(1):72-8189344
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1984 Feb;100(2):258-686362512
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Jan 12;160(1):41-69934342
Cites: J Health Econ. 1989 Mar;8(1):109-3210293367
Cites: J Clin Pharmacol. 1992 Mar;32(3):277-831564133
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Nov 11;329(20):1456-628413456
Cites: J Clin Pharmacol. 1996 Aug;36(8):674-828877670
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Jan 12;160(1):31-79934341
Comment On: CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):876-710750481
PubMed ID
10862224 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of a provincial prescription database for assessing medication adherence in heart failure patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158598
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2008 Mar;42(3):361-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Karen Dahri
Stephen J Shalansky
Linda Jang
Leon Jung
Andrew P Ignaszewski
Catherine Clark
Author Affiliation
CSU Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Karen.Dahri@vch.ca
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2008 Mar;42(3):361-7
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Databases, Factual - standards
Drug Monitoring - standards
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Heart Failure - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
British Columbia's central prescription database, PharmaNet, is often used for both clinical and research applications. However, PharmaNet details prescription transactions, not actual medication consumption, resulting in many potential sources of inaccuracy when the information is assumed to reflect population or individual drug utilization.
To assess the accuracy of PharmaNet for adherence assessment in patients with heart failure who are taking beta-blockers.
A 6-month prospective, longitudinal assessment of adherence to the prescribed beta-blocker regimen was carried out using both PharmaNet data and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) for each patient enrolled. The limit of agreement between the 2 adherence assessment methods was assessed using the Bland-Altman approach.
Fifteen of 58 patients initially enrolled in the study were excluded, most due to misuse of MEMS or failure to return the MEMS vial despite thorough follow-up. For the 43 patients included in the final analysis, mean +/- SD adherence was 97.8 +/- 11.8% when assessed by PharmaNet and 97.1 +/- 7.3% when MEMS was used. However, the limit of agreement, reported as the mean of the differences +/- 2SD, was 6.8 +/- 18.5%, indicating a moderate-to-high level of agreement between the 2 methods when the confidence interval is taken into consideration.
These results suggest that PharmaNet data accurately reflect medication adherence for most patients. The MEMS system proved unreliable in several cases, illustrating the difficulty of identifying a gold standard for adherence assessment.
PubMed ID
18303147 View in PubMed
Less detail

1734 records – page 1 of 174.