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Assessing the quality of drug detailing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188127
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;55(8):825-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
William Molloy
David Strang
Gordon Guyatt
Joel Lexchin
Michel Bédard
Sacha Dubois
Rosalie Russo
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Research Group, McMaster University, Hamilton Health Sciences, Henderson Site, 711 Concession Street, Ontario, Canada. molloy@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;55(8):825-32
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Drug Industry - standards
Drug Information Services - standards
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Family Practice - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Physicians - psychology
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
This study measured the validity of a new instrument, the Assessment Instrument for Drug Detailing (AIDD), used by doctors to score the quality of drug detailing provided by pharmaceutical representatives in their offices. Five pharmaceutical representatives provided "good, medium, and poor" details to 135 family doctors in their offices, who were blinded to the quality of the details. A "reference standard group" constructed the details and trained the representatives. An "assessment group" trained family physicians to use the AIDD to score the details. Physicians discriminated between different quality details in all but one domain, nomenclature (P
PubMed ID
12384198 View in PubMed
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The DARTS tool for assessing online medicines information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155185
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2008 Dec;30(6):898-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Ulla Närhi
Marika Pohjanoksa-Mäntylä
Anna Karjalainen
Johanna K Saari
Hannes Wahlroos
Marja S Airaksinen
Simon J Bell
Author Affiliation
European Commission, Directorate-General for Enterprise and Industry, Unit F/2, Avenue l'Auderghem 45, Brussels, Belgium. ulla.narhi@ec.europa.eu
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2008 Dec;30(6):898-906
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Information Services - standards
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Humans
Internet - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Quality of Health Care
Young Adult
Abstract
The use of the Internet as a source of medicines information is increasing. However, the quality of online information is highly variable. Equipping Internet users to distinguish good quality information is the aim of a new five-item quality assessment tool (DARTS) that was developed by the Working Group on Information to Patients under the Pharmaceutical Forum established by the European Commission. The objective of this study was to investigate how people with depression assess the quality of online medicines information and to study their opinions about the DARTS tool in assisting in this process.
Focus group discussions with Internet users were conducted in metropolitan Helsinki, Finland.
Six focus group discussions (67-109 min duration) were conducted with people with depression (n = 29). The DARTS tool was used as a stimulus after open discussion in relation to the evaluation of the quality of Internet-based medicines information. The focus groups were digitally audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were thematically content analysed by two researchers.
Focus group participants were generally critical of the information they retrieved. However, few participants systematically applied quality assessment criteria when retrieving online information. No participants had knowledge or experience of any quality assessment tools. The DARTS tool was perceived as being concise and easy to use and understand. Many participants indicated it would allay some of their concerns related to information quality and act as a reminder. While several participants felt the tool should not be any more extensive, some of them believed it should include a more in-depth explanation to accompany each of the quality criteria.
The DARTS tool may act as a prompt for people with depression to assess the quality of online information they obtain. The five DARTS criteria may form the basis of a systematic approach to quality assessment and the tool may also act as a reminder of quality issues in general. Further studies are needed to assess the actual value of the DARTS tool as well as its value in relation to other quality assessment instruments.
PubMed ID
18791806 View in PubMed
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Drug information from pharmacies: desire for more spontaneous information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220350
Source
Med Care. 1993 Sep;31(9):846-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993

[Drug information under the magnifying glass: Too short "expiration date" a threat to patient safety].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274722
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Dec 17-31;111(51-52):2268-9
Publication Type
Article

GPs' opinions of public and industrial information regarding drugs: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131876
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:204
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ingmarie Skoglund
Cecilia Björkelund
Kirsten Mehlig
Ronny Gunnarsson
Margareta Möller
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. ingmarie.skoglund@vgregion.se
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:204
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Industry - standards - trends
Drug Information Services - standards - trends
Drug Prescriptions - standards - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - standards - trends
Female
Humans
Information Dissemination
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians, Women - statistics & numerical data
Quality Control
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
General Practitioners {GP} in Sweden prescribe more than 50% of all prescriptions. Scientific knowledge on the opinions of GPs regarding drug information has been sparse. Such knowledge could be valuable when designing evidence-based drug information to GPs. GPs' opinions on public- and industry-provided drug information are presented in this article.
A cross-sectional study using a questionnaire was answered by 368 GPs at 97 primary-health care centres {PHCC}. The centres were invited to participate by eight out of 29 drug and therapeutic committees {DTCs}. A multilevel model was used to analyse associations between opinions of GPs regarding drug information and whether the GPs worked in public sector or in a private enterprise, their age, sex, and work experience. PHCC and geographical area were included as random effects.
About 85% of the GPs perceived they received too much information from the industry, that the quality of public information was high and useful, and that the main task of public authorities was to increase the GPs' knowledge of drugs. Female GPs valued information from public authorities to a much greater extent than male GPs. Out of the GPs, 93% considered the main task of the industry was to promote sales. Differences between the GPs' opinions between PHCCs were generally more visible than differences between areas.
Some kind of incentives could be considered for PHCCs that actively reduce drug promotion from the industry. That female GPs valued information from public authorities to a much greater extent than male GPs should be taken into consideration when designing evidence-based drug information from public authorities to make implementation easier.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21867497 View in PubMed
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[Hazardous drugs, high risk patients and high risk physicians].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225374
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Nov 27;88(48):4115
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1991

Impact of the dial access drug information service on patient outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198245
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2000 May;34(5):585-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
P S Melnyk
Y M Shevchuk
A J Remillard
Author Affiliation
Dial Access Drug Information Service, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan at Saskatoon, Canada. paul.melnyk@usask.ca
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2000 May;34(5):585-92
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Drug Information Services - standards
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Health Personnel
Humans
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pharmacists
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards
Quality of Health Care
Saskatchewan
Telephone
Time Factors
Abstract
To determine the impact of a drug information service on patient outcomes.
Prospective evaluation of patient-specific drug information requests.
Healthcare professional and consumer drug information service located at a college of pharmacy.
Consumers and healthcare professionals of the province.
Patient-specific questions received by the drug information service were reviewed and evaluated for actual patient outcome, inquirers' opinion of impact of the service with respect to patient outcome, and for objectivity and timeliness of the response. An expert panel determined whether the responses and recommendations given by the service were appropriate, determined what impact the service had on the patient, and assessed the seriousness of the inquiry.
Classification of patient outcome by objective and subjective data based on predetermined desired outcomes.
Ninety-eight and 68 patient-specific requests were received from healthcare professionals and consumers, respectively. The panel concluded that 94.9% of the healthcare requests and 98.5% of the consumer requests were answered appropriately and that the majority of the requests involved potentially serious drug-related problems. The panel also determined that 46.8% of the recommendations to healthcare professionals and 41.0% of the recommendations to consumers resulted in positive patient outcomes. The majority of the positive outcomes involved the prevention of a disease or its symptoms (professional section) and the reduction or elimination of symptoms (consumer section).
The drug information service not only met its objectives of providing drug information in an accurate, objective, and timely manner, but was also able to provide positive patient outcomes.
PubMed ID
10852084 View in PubMed
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[Improved information on drugs to patients. A project with a pharmacist in the therapeutic team at a cardiology department].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211673
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Jun 20;116(16):1901-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1996
Author
T. Veggeland
Author Affiliation
Sjukehusapoteket i Skien Telemark sentralsjukehus.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Jun 20;116(16):1901-3
Date
Jun-20-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Drug Information Services - standards
Humans
Norway
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Pharmacists
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
Patients with cardiac disease knew more about medicaments after receiving medicament-related counselling by a pharmacist on discharge from hospital. This was demonstrated by a questionnaire answered by 49 patients whose answers were compared with the results of a study conducted in 1991, when patients did not receive information from a pharmacist in hospital. More patients were pleased with the information, and most of them were satisfied with the consultation with the pharmacist. Lack of time was stated to be the main reason why other hospital health care professionals often provided insufficient information on medicaments to patients. It was discovered that physicians did not record a proper history of the medication. This affected management of the therapy and the information given to patients. This investigation shows that a pharmacist can make an important contribution to the care of patients. Health care professionals should begin to discuss with the health authorities how best to organize the information patients receive on medicaments.
PubMed ID
8711706 View in PubMed
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Information about a discontinued drug.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158325
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Mar 11;178(6):730
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2008
Author
Joel Lexchin
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Mar 11;178(6):730
Date
Mar-11-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Awareness
Canada
Drug Information Services - standards - trends
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Fluoroquinolones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Risk assessment
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):1369-7018025428
Comment On: CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):1369-7018025428
PubMed ID
18332392 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.