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320 records – page 1 of 32.

"Academic drug-detailing": from project to practice in a Swedish urban area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210063
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1997;52(3):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
C S Lundborg
L O Hensjö
L L Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Services, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. staff@ihcar.ki.se (attn: C. Stålsby Lundborg)
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1997;52(3):167-72
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Information Services - organization & administration
Family Practice
Feasibility Studies
Humans
Information Services - economics
Norfloxacin - therapeutic use
Pharmacists
Questionnaires
Substance-Related Disorders
Sweden
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy
Abstract
To develop and test the long-term feasibility of an interdisciplinary independent drug information service providing both written and oral drug information to physicians in an urban area of Sweden (> 400,000 inhabitants).
A drug information service was developed encouraging a cooperative approach between a department of clinical pharmacology, general practitioners (GPs), pharmacists, and Drug and Therapeutic Committees. Scientifically-based drug information was condensed and interpreted by a team and presented in both written and oral form. In one part of the area, both oral and written information was provided, while in another part of the area, only written information was distributed. Questionnaires and one prescription survey were performed to elucidate the knowledge and attitudes of the GPs regarding drug treatment of one condition (urinary tract infection, UTI, and norfloxacin were used as examples), as well as their opinion of our services.
Over a period of 10 years, 75 issues of a drug bulletin (2000 copies) were distributed. Oral producer-independent drug information, provided jointly by a GP and a pharmacist, was given on 16 occasions in each of 30 health centres (150 GPs). Around 80% of the GPs participated in the meetings. Of these GPs, 75% found the service important for their daily work. A majority of the GPs had prescribed the test drug, norfloxacin, not a first-line drug according to local recommendations, 1 year after approval. A significantly lower proportion of prescribers were observed in the area where the GPs had been provided with both written and oral information regarding recommended treatment (including first-line drugs) for uncomplicated cystitis. The approximate cost for this service in 1995 was SEK 0.685 million (USD 0.1 million); the prescribing costs of the 150 GPs were estimated at SEK 255 million per year. This means that the cost of the service per GP is only around 0.3% of normal prescribing costs.
Over a period of 10 years the information/education method described here has proven sustainable and feasible in terms of providing the information, regarding participation of the target group GPs in the oral sessions, and regarding integration of the service into the existing health care system.
PubMed ID
9218921 View in PubMed
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Access to pesticide registration data in Canada: who should know?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235569
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Feb 15;136(4):329-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1987

[A conflict between physicians and nurses about the drug lists. Please, do not disturb--the drug documentation is going on].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205186
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jun 3;95(23):2728-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-3-1998

[Acute respiratory tract infections: recommendations from the Medical Products Agency is a document with many questions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214914
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 28;92(26-27):2678-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-1995
Author
C. Schalen
C. Kamme
Author Affiliation
Kliniskt mikrobiologiskt laboratorium, Lund.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 28;92(26-27):2678-80
Date
Jun-28-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Cephalosporins - administration & dosage
Drug Information Services
Drug Utilization
Guidelines as Topic - standards
Humans
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Sweden
PubMed ID
7637450 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug effects and the need for drug information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226228
Source
Med Care. 1991 Jun;29(6):558-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
H. Enlund
K. Vainio
S. Wallenius
J W Poston
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Med Care. 1991 Jun;29(6):558-64
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Information Services
Female
Finland
Hospitals
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Abstract
The information needs of a group of patients taking antihypertensive medication were assessed with special emphasis on the influence of perceived symptoms of high blood pressure and adverse drug effects. All patients of a hypertension clinic currently on antihypertensive medication were included in the study. The response rate to the questionnaire was 85%. Of the 623 patients included, only 31% expressed satisfaction with the amount of information received on adverse effects of their antihypertensive drugs. Patients younger than 50 years explicitly expressed a need for information more often than those older than 64. There were no differences in the expressed information needs between men and women. The reported experience of symptoms related to high blood pressure and adverse drug effects was more common among younger patients than among the elderly. Of those who experienced both adverse drug effects and symptoms, 57% expressed a need for more information, whereas only 30% of those who had no such experiences expressed a need for more information on adverse drug effects. It was concluded that there is a substantial need for more information on adverse drug effects, especially among those who have experienced adverse drug effects or some symptoms of hypertension.
PubMed ID
2046409 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jul 12;183(10):1173, 1175
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2011
Author
Heikki Savolainen
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jul 12;183(10):1173, 1175
Date
Jul-12-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Drug Industry
Drug Information Services
Drug Labeling
Drug Prescriptions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Off-Label Use - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):994-521670118
Cites: Comp Biochem Physiol B. 1973 Feb 15;44(2):467-724350882
Comment On: CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):994-521670118
PubMed ID
21746831 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Oct 23;123(20):2918-9; author reply 2919
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-23-2003
Author
Henrik Lund
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Oct 23;123(20):2918-9; author reply 2919
Date
Oct-23-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Catalogs, Drug
Drug Approval
Drug Information Services
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Norway
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Sep 11;123(17):2414-714562773
PubMed ID
14600727 View in PubMed
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[Adverse effects--making nail soup or nailing the coffin?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182264
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Dec 23;123(24):3628
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-23-2003
Author
Svein Reseland
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Dec 23;123(24):3628
Date
Dec-23-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Drug Approval
Drug Information Services
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
14691529 View in PubMed
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Advice on drug safety in pregnancy: are there differences between commonly used sources of information?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92477
Source
Drug Saf. 2008;31(9):799-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Frost Widnes Sofia K
Schjøtt Jan
Author Affiliation
Regional Drug Information Centre (RELIS Vest), Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Drug Saf. 2008;31(9):799-806
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Industry
Drug Information Services - organization & administration - standards
Drug Labeling
Female
Humans
Norway
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects - classification
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimesters
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Safety regarding use in pregnancy is not established for many drugs. Inconsistencies between sources providing drug information can give rise to confusion with possible therapeutic consequences. Therefore, it is important to measure clinically important differences between drug information sources. The objective of this study was to compare two easily accessible Norwegian sources providing advice on drug safety in pregnancy - the product monographs in the Felleskatalog (FK), published by the pharmaceutical companies, and the five regional Drug Information Centres (DICs) in Norway - in addition to assessing the frequency of questions regarding drug safety in pregnancy made to the DICs according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. METHODS: Advice on drug use in pregnancy provided by the DICs in 2003 and 2005 were compared with advice in the product monographs for the respective drugs in the FK. Comparison of advice was based on categorization to one of four categories: can be used, benefit-risk assessment, should not be used, or no available information. RESULTS: A total of 443 drug advice were categorized. Seven out of ten of drugs frequently enquired about, according to the ATC system, were drugs acting on the nervous system (group N). For 208 (47%) of the drugs, advice differed between the DICs and FK. Advice from the FK was significantly (p
PubMed ID
18707194 View in PubMed
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320 records – page 1 of 32.