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102 records – page 1 of 11.

[A comparison of the immune response induced by DNA or by an inactivated vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57514
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Mar-Apr;(2):54-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Morozova
R V Popova
T G Maksimova
E E Mitrofanova
V N Bakhvalova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Mar-Apr;(2):54-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - genetics - immunology - pathogenicity
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - immunology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Female
Glycoproteins - immunology
Immunization - methods
Lethal Dose 50
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Vaccines, DNA - immunology
Vaccines, Inactivated - immunology
Viral Nonstructural Proteins - immunology
Viral Structural Proteins - immunology
Viral Vaccines - immunology
Abstract
BALB/c mice were immunized with recombinant plasmid DNA pSVK3-ENS1 and pcDNAI-NS3 containing, respectively, genes E-NS1 and NS3 of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus. Antibodies to TBE virus proteins were detected in the blood sera of the immunized animals by the method of the enzyme immunoassay. Though the titers of virus-specific antibodies in the sera of mice immunized with protein vaccines exceeded those registered after immunization with DNA vaccines, essential protective immunity was observed after the use of both vaccines.
PubMed ID
10808575 View in PubMed
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[A cytomorphological basis for the correction of radiation-induced immunodeficiencies and hematopoietic depression using thymus and bone marrow peptides]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46586
Source
Arkh Patol. 1993 Mar-Apr;55(2):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
O K Khmel'nitskii
I I Grintsevich
V A Kotov
S V Seryi
Source
Arkh Patol. 1993 Mar-Apr;55(2):50-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adjuvants, Immunologic - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Comparative Study
Drug Combinations
Drug Evaluation
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
English Abstract
Female
Guinea Pigs
Hematopoiesis - drug effects - radiation effects
Humans
Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes - drug therapy - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides - therapeutic use
Power Plants
Radiation Injuries - complications - drug therapy - pathology
Radiation Injuries, Experimental - complications - drug therapy - pathology
Thymus Hormones - therapeutic use
Ukraine
Abstract
The correction of radiation-induced immunodeficiency and hematopoiesis depression in clinical setting (100 patients) and in experiments (160 animals) by peptide preparations of the thymus and bone marrow (thymalin, hemalin, thymogemine and synthetic thymalin analog thymogen) has been studied. Administration of the bone marrow and thymus recovery of damage to the thymus, bone marrow, spleen and lymph nodes, improved the function of circulating neutrophilic granulocytes. Thymalin was able to compensate for immune disturbances and reduce manifestations of asthenia.
PubMed ID
7980063 View in PubMed
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An advanced and detailed in vitro validation procedure for the radiolabeling of carrier-free terbutaline sulphate dry powder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10108
Source
J Aerosol Med. 2001;14(2):227-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P S Walker
G L Petterson
E. Bondesson
J H Conway
Author Affiliation
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, England. P.S.Walker@soton.ac.uk
Source
J Aerosol Med. 2001;14(2):227-36
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Aerosols
Asthma - diagnosis - radionuclide imaging
Bias (epidemiology)
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Humans
Lung - drug effects - radionuclide imaging
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Powders
Sensitivity and specificity
Technetium - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Terbutaline - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
The aerodynamic properties of 99mTc radiolabeled carrier-free terbutaline sulphate (TBS) have been thoroughly investigated following delivery by Turbuhaler (AstraZeneca Lund, Sweden). A full and detailed radiolabeling procedure is also reported. The in vitro radiolabel validation was performed to determine whether TBS radiolabeled in this way would be representative of the commercially available product Bricanyl Turbuhaler during clinical trials. The results indicated that variations in aerodynamic properties had been introduced and that the radiolabel would slightly underestimate the fine particle fraction of Bricanyl, but would nonetheless act as a suitable marker in vivo. Assumptions regarding the aerodynamic properties of doses likely to be received by clinical trial subjects were also examined. This has been achieved by extending the validation procedures beyond those usually reported to include dose number, time, and homogeneity dependent studies. It was found that doses extracted for testing purposes and simulated patient doses extracted shortly afterward had similar properties. Doses extracted 2 h after initial testing also had similar properties to the test doses. These results suggested that data from the test doses could be used for quality control purposes, would be representative of the doses to be received by clinical trial subjects, and that a short delay between initial testing and trial subject inhalation would be acceptable.
PubMed ID
11681654 View in PubMed
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[An experimental validation of the clinical use of a nitroglycerin ointment of an original composition]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11574
Source
Lik Sprava. 1994 May-Jun;(5-6):117-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Panchyshyna
Ia M Fedoriv
T A Shuflat
L A Bielova
Iu M Panchyshyn
Source
Lik Sprava. 1994 May-Jun;(5-6):117-8
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Animals
Coronary Vasospasm - chemically induced - drug therapy
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - drug therapy - etiology
Dinitrochlorobenzene
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
English Abstract
Nitroglycerin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Ointments
Pituitary Hormones, Posterior
Rats
Abstract
Application employment of the proposed nitroglycerin ointment, original in its composition, permits the attacks of angina pectoris to be controlled, their onset to be prevented and adverse events associated with the use of nitrates to be eliminated. Therapeutic benefit becomes clinically apparent with small doses of nitroglycerin, the ointment itself is good for repeated therapeutic and prophylactic application.
PubMed ID
7530402 View in PubMed
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[An experimental validation of the use of levomycetin preparations for the treatment of burns infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10610
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1999 May-Jun;61(3):30-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
V L Tkachenko
A Ia Tsyganenko
N A Liapunov
E P Bezuglaia
V V Minukhin
Author Affiliation
Kharkov State Medical University, Ukraine.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1999 May-Jun;61(3):30-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Burns - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Chloramphenicol - administration & dosage
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
English Abstract
Gels
Mice
Mice, Inbred CBA
Ointments
Pseudomonas Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - isolation & purification
Abstract
Application of 1% of chloramphenicol (gel and cream) for local treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn infection has been studied in experiment. In vivo, both medical forms show pronounced therapeutic effect, they promote elimination of P. aeruginosa from wounds and decrease inflammation. In noninfected thermal trauma in laboratory animals application of gel and cream of chloramphenicol reduces transition from the phase of inflammation to the phase of reparation by 3-8 days and prevents infection of the burn wound by conditionally pathogenic microflora.
PubMed ID
10483230 View in PubMed
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The anti-arrhythmia properties of the functional opioid agonist orphanin FQ (nociceptin)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10569
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 1999 Sep-Oct;62(5):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
L N Maslov
A V Krylatov
Iu B Lishmanov
E. Albrecht
Author Affiliation
Department of Experimental Cardiology, Institute of Cardiology, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Tomsk, Russia.
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 1999 Sep-Oct;62(5):21-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aconitine
Animals
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - therapeutic use
Arrhythmia - chemically induced - drug therapy - physiopathology
Calcium Chloride
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Electrocardiography - drug effects
English Abstract
Epinephrine
Male
Opioid Peptides - therapeutic use
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, Opioid - agonists
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
It was shown that the agonist of peripheral ORL1 receptors nociceptine raises heart resistance to the antiarrhythmic effect of aconitine. The antiarrhythmic effect of nociceptine is not connected with a change in the tonus of the autonomous nervous system or with an effect on opiate receptors. It is assumed that the antiarrhythmic properties of nociceptine are realized through inhibition of Na+/Ca2+ metabolism or blockade of rapid Na(+) channels of the cardiomyocytes.
PubMed ID
10572746 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant medication use and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk: no association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178524
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Sep 15;160(6):566-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2004
Author
Saira Bahl
Michelle Cotterchio
Nancy Kreiger
Neil Klar
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Sep 15;160(6):566-75
Date
Sep-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Animals
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - classification
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Chi-Square Distribution
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology
Male
Medical History Taking
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Registries
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
Animal and human studies have suggested that antidepressant medications may be associated with several cancers. The authors evaluated the association between antidepressant medication use and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma using a Canadian population-based case-control study, the National Enhanced Cancer Surveillance Study. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases (n=638) diagnosed in 1995-1996 were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry, and controls (n=1,930) were identified from the Ontario Ministry of Finance Property Assessment Database. Antidepressant medication use was ascertained using a self-administered questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. "Ever" use of antidepressant medications was not associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk. The odds ratio for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 25 or more months of tricyclic antidepressant medication use was 1.6; however, this was nonsignificant. Duration or history of use or individual types of antidepressant medications were not associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk. These findings do not support an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with antidepressant medication use.
PubMed ID
15353417 View in PubMed
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102 records – page 1 of 11.