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[Accidents with fatal outcome in Finnish leisure boating 1986-1988].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103579
Source
Beitr Gerichtl Med. 1990;48:185-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Penttilä
J. Pikkarainen
Author Affiliation
Institut für Rechtsmedizin, Universität Helsinki.
Source
Beitr Gerichtl Med. 1990;48:185-91
Date
1990
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drowning - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Leisure Activities
Risk factors
Ships - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
All 291 fatal accidents (510 persons on board, 318 drowned) in water traffic in Finland in 1986-1988 were investigated by specific teams. Only some data of this extensive investigation are presented in this study. Staggering and falling in boat because of drunkenness, falling over and sinking of boat were the main causes of getting into water of the people aboard. Only 3.5% of the drowned had used life jackets and 9.7% of them could not swim. The reduced ability to swim because of alcohol and the exhaustion were in about half of the drowned the actual cause and the cold water in one third the background factor for drowning. The results indicate that fatal accidents in water traffic are a major problem of males (95.9%) and give important information for countermeasures.
PubMed ID
2241787 View in PubMed
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Acute influence of alcohol, THC or central stimulants on violent suicide: A Swedish population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258141
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2014 Mar;59(2):436-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Lena Lundholm
Ingemar Thiblin
Bo Runeson
Anders Leifman
Anna Fugelstad
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2014 Mar;59(2):436-40
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Asphyxia - mortality
Central Nervous System Depressants - blood
Central Nervous System Stimulants - blood
Dronabinol - blood
Drowning - mortality
Ethanol - blood
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Forensic Toxicology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neck Injuries - mortality
Poisoning - mortality
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds, Gunshot - mortality
Wounds, Penetrating - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol and substance abuse in general is a risk factor for suicide, but very little is known about the acute effect in relation to suicide method. Based on information from 18,894 medico-legal death investigations, including toxicological findings and manner of death, did the present study investigate whether acute influence of alcohol, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), or central stimulants (amphetamine and cocaine) was related to the use of a violent suicide method, in comparison with the nonviolent method self-poisoning and alcohol-/illicit drug-negative suicide decedents. Multivariate analysis was conducted, and the results revealed that acute influence of THC was related to using the violent suicide method–– jumping from a height (RR 1.62; 95% CI 1.01–2.41). Alcohol intoxication was not related to any violent method, while the central stimulant-positive suicide decedent had a higher, albeit not significant, risk of several violent methods. The study contributes with elucidating suicide methods in relation to acute intoxication.
PubMed ID
24745078 View in PubMed
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Alcohol "on board," man overboard--boating fatalities in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204700
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Aug 11;159(3):259-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-1998
Author
A. Chochinov
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, St. Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, Man.
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Aug 11;159(3):259-60
Date
Aug-11-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adult
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Canada
Cause of Death
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Drowning - mortality
Humans
Male
Ships
Notes
Cites: Q J Exp Physiol Cogn Med Sci. 1961 Jan;46:83-9413752104
Cites: Aviat Space Environ Med. 1992 Dec;63(12):1077-811456919
Cites: J Forensic Sci. 1981 Jul;26(3):459-617252459
Cites: J Appl Physiol. 1976 Jun;40(6):903-10931929
PubMed ID
9724984 View in PubMed
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Alcohol's role in the deaths of BC children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189910
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 May-Jun;93(3):173-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Wayne Mitic
John Greschner
Author Affiliation
Children's Commission, PO Box 9207, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9J1. wayne.mitic@gems5.gov.bc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 May-Jun;93(3):173-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Adolescent
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning - mortality
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Sudden Infant Death - epidemiology
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine the prevalence and context of alcohol use in the deaths of children and youth reviewed by the BC Children's Commission.
In 489 case reviews of BC children and youth, we examined the role that alcohol may have had at the time of death or whether there was a history of alcohol use either by the deceased child or another person in the child's life.
Alcohol is most prevalent in the lives of 15-18 year olds. It is present at the time of death in two fifths of Motor Vehicle Incidents (MVI) and one third of suicides and drownings.
Alcohol has a profound presence in the lives and deaths of children reviewed by the Children's Commission. Enhancing deterrence laws and alcohol control policies, and increasing public awareness are warranted.
PubMed ID
12050981 View in PubMed
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Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2016 Aug;42:45-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Carl Johan Wingren
Anders Ottosson
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2016 Aug;42:45-50
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asphyxia - mortality
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Drowning - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Injuries - mortality
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Poisoning - mortality
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Thinness - epidemiology
Wounds, Gunshot - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
Overweight and obesity is associated with lower rates of suicide. However, little is known about the association with different suicide methods. We studied the association between groups of body mass index and suicide methods. We identified all medicolegal autopsy cases with a cause of death due to external causes in Sweden during 1999-2013 (N = 39,368) and included 11,715 suicides and 13,316 accidents or homicides as controls. We applied multinomial regression models adjusted for age, sex, year and season of death. Obesity was associated with suicidal intoxication, OR 1.15 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02, 1.30] and negatively associated with all other suicide methods studied. Underweight showed a negative association with suicidal drowning and there was an indication towards a negative association with hanging in men OR 0.81 (95% CI 0.65, 1.01). We conclude that body mass index (BMI) is associated with the choice of suicide method. This may be of importance in a public health perspective, e.g. potential for prevention of intoxications. In the practice of forensic medicine, the physician's level of suspicion may rise if the apparent suicidal method is less common for the individual characteristics of the deceased, such as BMI.
PubMed ID
27239953 View in PubMed
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Case analyses of all children's drowning deaths occurring in Sweden 1998-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117593
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Mar;41(2):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jan Schyllander
Staffan Janson
Cecilia Nyberg
Ulla-Britt Eriksson
Diana Stark Ekman
Author Affiliation
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, Karlstad, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Mar;41(2):174-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Cause of Death - trends
Child
Child, Preschool
Death Certificates
Drowning - mortality
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The goal of this research project was to explore circumstances surrounding each drowning death occurring to children and adolescents ages 0-17 in Sweden during the years 1998-2007.
Records from the National Board of Forensic Medicine (NBFM) and other sources were analysed. We collected information on children's personal characteristics (sex, age, ethnic background, weight, height, physical condition, and pre-existing health conditions) and the circumstances of deaths (time and place of occurrence, type of drowning, resuscitation efforts and medical care given, for example). We also collected information on prevention factors: the physical environment, adult supervision, whether or not the child could swim, and if the child was using a personal flotation device at the time of death.
Our analysis showed that 109 children had drowned in Sweden during the study period - of this group, 96 had died from unintentional causes. Children from immigrant backgrounds, particularly with families coming from the Middle East and Iran, were inordinately represented in the group of victims who had died from unintentional drowning deaths. Other risk factors included: coming from a single parent-headed family, alcohol use by older victims and a lack of ability to swim.
Prevention efforts to prevent drowning in the future should focus on preventing alcohol use by young bathers; better fencing around swimming sites; improved coverage of swimming lessons to all children in Sweden, especially children from immigrant families; more education on drowning risks for single parents; and better awareness by adults on the need for constant supervision of children and adolescents in and near water.
PubMed ID
23282938 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and outcome among patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to drowning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86548
Source
Resuscitation. 2008 Mar;76(3):381-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Claesson Andreas
Svensson Leif
Silfverstolpe Johan
Herlitz Johan
Author Affiliation
Kungälv Ambulance Service, Kungälv, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 2008 Mar;76(3):381-7
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning - mortality
Female
Heart Arrest - etiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Registries
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIM: To describe the characteristics and outcome among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by drowning as compared with OHCA caused by a cardiac etiology (outside home). PATIENTS AND METHODS: All the patients included in the Swedish OHCA Registry between 1990 and 2005 which were not crew witnessed, in whom cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted, were evaluated for inclusion. Those caused by drowning were compared with those with a cardiac etiology (outside home). RESULTS: Patients with OHCA due to drowning (n=255) differed from patients with OHCA with a cardiac etiology (n=7494) as they were younger, less frequently suffered a witnessed OHCA, more frequently received bystander CPR and less frequently were found in a shockable rhythm. Patients with OHCA due to drowning had a prolonged ambulance response time as compared with patients with OHCA with a cardiac etiology. Patients with OHCA due to drowning had a survival rate to 1 month of 11.5% as compared with 8.8% among patients with OHCA due to a cardiac etiology (NS). Among patients with OHCA due to drowning, only one independent predictor of survival was defined, i.e. time from calling for an ambulance until the arrival of the rescue team, with a much higher survival among patients with a shorter ambulance response time. CONCLUSION: Among patients with OHCA 0.9% were caused by drowning. They had a similar survival rate to 1 month as compared with OHCA outside home with a cardiac etiology. The factor associated with survival was the ambulance response time; a higher survival with a shorter response time.
PubMed ID
17997210 View in PubMed
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Death in epileptic people: a review of Manitoba's medical examiner's cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165532
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2007 Jul;14(5):275-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Sholeh Barooni
A. Thambirajah Balachandra
Lesley Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Ghods Avenue, Poursina Street, Tehran 14155, Iran. barooni@sina.tums.ac.ir
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2007 Jul;14(5):275-8
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Drowning - mortality
Epilepsy - etiology - mortality
Female
Forensic Medicine
Humans
Infant
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Stroke - mortality
Substance Abuse Detection
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Studies of cause-specific mortality show that deaths of epileptic people can be classified into those directly or indirectly related to epilepsy; those related to the underlying pathology giving rise to epilepsy; and those unrelated to either epilepsy or its causes. In this descriptive retrospective study, medical examiner's cases that occurred in Manitoba, Canada during 2004 were reviewed. One hundred and seventeen cases (4.06%) had epilepsy in their history. Cause of death was related directly to seizure in 12 cases (10.3%) and indirectly in six cases (5.1%); related to underlying pathology giving rise to epilepsy in 33 cases (28.2%); and unrelated to either of them in 60 cases (51.3%). Cause of death was unknown in six cases (5.1%). The causes of death, in order of frequency, were cardiac pneumonia, cerebrovascular accident and seizure disorder. Manner of death was natural in 86 cases (73.5%), accidental in 19 cases (16.2%), suicidal in five cases (4.3%), undetermined in five cases (4.3%) and homicidal in two cases (1.7%). While the mean age of the deceased persons with a positive history of seizure in this study was about 10 years less than those with a negative history of seizure, there was no significant difference between them in the manner of death. Epileptic people are not at greater risk for accidental death or suicide; however they are at greater risk for drowning. Recently diagnosed cases of epilepsy are at greater risk of dying from seizure or underlying pathology during the first year of their disease.
PubMed ID
17240183 View in PubMed
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Demographics of suicide victims in Sweden in relation to their blood-alcohol concentration and the circumstances and manner of death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99453
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2010 May 20;198(1-3):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2010
Author
Anita Holmgren
Alan Wayne Jones
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Artillerigatan 12, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2010 May 20;198(1-3):17-22
Date
May-20-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asphyxia - mortality
Central Nervous System Depressants - blood
Child
Chromatography, Gas
Drowning - mortality
Ethanol - blood
Female
Forensic Toxicology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poisoning - mortality
Sex Distribution
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds, Gunshot - mortality
Wounds, Stab - mortality
Abstract
Specimens of blood and other body fluids were obtained at autopsy from all deaths in Sweden classified as suicide covering a 10-year period (N=11,441 cases). The mean age (+/-standard deviation, SD) of the victims was 51.3+/-18.8 years with a clear predominance of males 71% (mean age 51.3+/-18.8 years) compared with 29% females (mean age 51.4+/-18.9 years). The concentration of ethanol in blood samples was determined in duplicate by headspace gas chromatography and a mean blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.1g/L (10mg/100mL) was the cut-off used to identify ethanol positive cases. The suicides were coded (ICD-9) as self-poisonings (N=2462, 22%), hanging (N=4474, 39%), asphyxia by gas (N=509, 4.4%), drowning (N=803, 7.0%), gun shot (N=1307, 11.4%), fall from height (N=632, 5.5%), self-inflicted cuts or sharp-force injury (N=363, 3.1%) and miscellaneous ways (N=891, 7.8%). On average 34% of all suicide victims in Sweden had consumed alcohol before death, 36% of the males and 31% of the females had a positive BAC. The mean (median) concentration of alcohol in femoral blood for men was 1.34g/L (1.3g/L) compared with 1.25g/L (1.1g/L) for women. Many victims were heavily intoxicated and the 90th percentiles of the BAC distributions ranged from 2.3 to 2.8g/L depending on manner of death. Elevated blood-alcohol was most prevalent in poisoning deaths (45%) and gas asphyxia (51%) and least prevalent in falls from height (19%) and sharp-force injury (18%). Toxicological analysis for presence of drugs other than alcohol showed a predominance of paracetamol, SSRI antidepressants, anti-psychotics, sedative-hypnotics, and centrally acting opioids. A host of psycho-social factors drive a person to commit suicide and one of the catalysts is over-consumption of alcohol and acute alcohol intoxication. Heavy drinking leads to a loss of inhibitions, impulsive behaviour, poor judgment and a tendency to take risks, all of which might increase the propensity of predisposed individuals to take their own lives.
PubMed ID
20056362 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.