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27 years of forensic odontology in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36492
Source
Swed Dent J. 1993;17(6):249-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H. Borrman
M. Taheri
B. Woxberg
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1993;17(6):249-53
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bites, Human - epidemiology
Burns - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning - epidemiology
Female
Forensic Dentistry - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively all cases of forensic odontology during the period 1964-1990 in Göteborg. A total number of 281 cases were registered during a period of 27 years. The mean age of the victims was 39.5 years and 73 per cent of the deceased persons were men. The identification cases dominated (274). A definitive identity was established in 207 cases (75.6%) and the identity could not be determined in 34 cases (12.4%). The causes of death were also analyzed. The total number of burned victims; in buildings, boats or cars was 84. Eighty-one persons were submersed in water. There were 49 victims of mutilation due to traffic accidents. Twenty-two persons were found in the wood. Seventeen persons died in their homes or abroad and were not found immediately after death and therefore the relatives were not asked to identify the decreased. There was no information about the cause of death in 21 cases.
PubMed ID
8134894 View in PubMed
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[About the possibility to detect the fact of corpse transportation from the sea coastline with the subsequent burial].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263372
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2015 Jan-Feb;58(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
D Yu Ponomarev
A V Nikitaev
A M Kurch
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2015 Jan-Feb;58(1):13-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - pathology
Burial
Cadaver
Drowning - pathology
Forensic Anthropology - methods
Humans
Oceans and Seas
Postmortem Changes
Russia
Seawater
Abstract
The objective of the present work was to detect and describe the new features characterizing the long-term stay of a corpse in seawater followed by its burial on earth. The bones of the skeletonized corpse were found to be covered with mussels and petrified sea worms that can serve as the indicators of staying the corps in seawater and its subsequent transportation from the sea coastline to the inland. These findings can be used to clarify the circumstances of death of the people found in the illegal burial places at the seacoast of maritime areas.
PubMed ID
25874312 View in PubMed
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[Accidental child deaths by falls through ice in 1973-1977]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40485
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Mar 15;144(11):830-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1982
Author
L. Bjerrum
P. Bjerrum
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Mar 15;144(11):830-2
Date
Mar-15-1982
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Drowning - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Ice
Infant
Male
PubMed ID
7101518 View in PubMed
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Accidental deaths among British Columbia Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102957
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34.
Publication Type
Article
Date
29 Jan 1966
  1 website  
Author
Schmitt N
Hole LW
Barclay WS
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34.
Date
29 Jan 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication
British Columbia
Burns
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Abstract
A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns.Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon.This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns.
Online Resources
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Accidental deaths among British Columbia Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112073
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-1966
Author
N. Schmitt
L W Hole
W S Barclay
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34
Date
Jan-29-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication
British Columbia
Burns
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Abstract
A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns.Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon.This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1962 Oct;53:409-1213992080
PubMed ID
5902238 View in PubMed
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Accidental injury is a serious risk in children with typical absence epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14288
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):929-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
E C Wirrell
P R Camfield
C S Camfield
J M Dooley
K E Gordon
Author Affiliation
IWK-Grace Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):929-32
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - physiopathology
Burns - epidemiology
Child
Comparative Study
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy, Absence - complications - physiopathology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Medical Records
Near Drowning - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine if young adults with a history of typical absence epilepsy (AE) in childhood have a greater risk of accidental injury than controls with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). To assess the nature and severity of these injuries. METHODS: All patients with AE or JRA diagnosed between 1977 and 1985, who were 18 years or older at the onset of the study, were identified from review of pediatric electroencephalographic records for the province of Nova Scotia (AE) or review of the medical records database at the only tertiary care pediatric center for the province (JRA). Fifty-nine (86%) of 69 patients with AE and 61 (80%) of 76 patients with JRA participated in an interview in 1994 or 1995, assessing nature, severity, and treatment of prior accidental injuries. Patients with AE were further questioned about injuries sustained during an absence seizure. RESULTS: Sixteen (27%) of 59 patients with AE reported accidental injury during an absence seizure, with risk of injury being 9% per person-year of AE. Most injuries (81%) occurred during anti-epileptic drug therapy. Although the majority of injuries did not require treatment, 2 (13%) of 16 patients required minor treatment and 2 (13%) of 16 were admitted to hospital. The risk of accidental injury resulting from an absence seizure in person-years at risk was highest in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (45%), moderate in juvenile AE (14%), and lowest in childhood AE (3%). Patients with AE had a greater number of overall accidental injuries than those with JRA (P
Notes
Comment In: Arch Neurol. 1997 Sep;54(9):10639311348
PubMed ID
8815859 View in PubMed
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[Accidents with fatal outcome in Finnish leisure boating 1986-1988].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103579
Source
Beitr Gerichtl Med. 1990;48:185-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Penttilä
J. Pikkarainen
Author Affiliation
Institut für Rechtsmedizin, Universität Helsinki.
Source
Beitr Gerichtl Med. 1990;48:185-91
Date
1990
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drowning - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Leisure Activities
Risk factors
Ships - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
All 291 fatal accidents (510 persons on board, 318 drowned) in water traffic in Finland in 1986-1988 were investigated by specific teams. Only some data of this extensive investigation are presented in this study. Staggering and falling in boat because of drunkenness, falling over and sinking of boat were the main causes of getting into water of the people aboard. Only 3.5% of the drowned had used life jackets and 9.7% of them could not swim. The reduced ability to swim because of alcohol and the exhaustion were in about half of the drowned the actual cause and the cold water in one third the background factor for drowning. The results indicate that fatal accidents in water traffic are a major problem of males (95.9%) and give important information for countermeasures.
PubMed ID
2241787 View in PubMed
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203 records – page 1 of 21.