Skip header and navigation

Refine By

25 records – page 1 of 3.

Adaptation as a political process: adjusting to drought and conflict in Kenya's drylands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95503
Source
Environ Manage. 2009 May;43(5):817-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Eriksen Siri
Lind Jeremy
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1096, Blindern, 0317, Oslo, Norway. siri.eriksen@sgeo.uio.no
Source
Environ Manage. 2009 May;43(5):817-35
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Decision Making
Droughts
Economics
Greenhouse Effect
Kenya
Politics
Public Policy
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In this article, we argue that people's adjustments to multiple shocks and changes, such as conflict and drought, are intrinsically political processes that have uneven outcomes. Strengthening local adaptive capacity is a critical component of adapting to climate change. Based on fieldwork in two areas in Kenya, we investigate how people seek to access livelihood adjustment options and promote particular adaptation interests through forming social relations and political alliances to influence collective decision-making. First, we find that, in the face of drought and conflict, relations are formed among individuals, politicians, customary institutions, and government administration aimed at retaining or strengthening power bases in addition to securing material means of survival. Second, national economic and political structures and processes affect local adaptive capacity in fundamental ways, such as through the unequal allocation of resources across regions, development policy biased against pastoralism, and competition for elected political positions. Third, conflict is part and parcel of the adaptation process, not just an external factor inhibiting local adaptation strategies. Fourth, there are relative winners and losers of adaptation, but whether or not local adjustments to drought and conflict compound existing inequalities depends on power relations at multiple geographic scales that shape how conflicting interests are negotiated locally. Climate change adaptation policies are unlikely to be successful or minimize inequity unless the political dimensions of local adaptation are considered; however, existing power structures and conflicts of interests represent political obstacles to developing such policies.
PubMed ID
18726051 View in PubMed
Less detail

Almost 50 years of monitoring shows that climate, not forestry, controls long-term organic carbon fluxes in a large boreal watershed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262840
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Apr;20(4):1225-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Ahti Lepistö
Martyn N Futter
Pirkko Kortelainen
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Apr;20(4):1225-37
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration
Carbon - analysis
Carbon Cycle
Climate
Droughts
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Floods
Forestry
Models, Theoretical
Seasons
Temperature
Abstract
Here, we use a unique long-term data set on total organic carbon (TOC) fluxes, its climatic drivers and effects of land management from a large boreal watershed in northern Finland. TOC and runoff have been monitored at several sites in the Simojoki watershed (3160 km(2) ) since the early 1960s. Annual TOC fluxes have increased significantly together with increased inter-annual variability. Acid deposition in the area has been low and has not significantly influenced losses of TOC. Forest management, including ditching and clear felling, had a minor influence on TOC fluxes - seasonal and long-term patterns in TOC were controlled primarily by changes in soil frost, seasonal precipitation, drought, and runoff. Deeper soil frost led to lower spring TOC concentrations in the river. Summer TOC concentrations were positively correlated with precipitation and soil moisture not temperature. There is some indication that drought conditions led to elevated TOC concentrations and fluxes in subsequent years (1998-2000). A sensitivity analysis of the INCA-C model results showed the importance of landscape position, land-use type, and soil temperature as controls of modeled TOC concentrations. Model predictions were not sensitive to forest management. Our results are contradictory to some earlier plot-scale and small catchment studies that have shown more profound forest management impacts on TOC fluxes. This shows the importance of scale when assessing the mechanisms controlling TOC fluxes and concentrations. The results highlight the value of long-term multiple data sets to better understand ecosystem response to land management, climate change and extremes in northern ecosystems.
PubMed ID
24501106 View in PubMed
Less detail

Belowground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L./Picea abies [L.] Karst).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98937
Source
Environ Pollut. 2010 Apr;158(4):1071-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Petia S Nikolova
Christian P Andersen
Helmut Blaschke
Rainer Matyssek
Karl-Heinz Häberle
Author Affiliation
Technische Universität München, Weihenstephan Center of Life and Food Sciences, Freising, Germany. nikolova@wzw.tum.de
Source
Environ Pollut. 2010 Apr;158(4):1071-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Climate change
Droughts
Fagus - drug effects - metabolism
Ozone - toxicity
Picea - drug effects - metabolism
Plant Roots - drug effects - metabolism
Soil - analysis
Abstract
The effects of experimentally elevated O(3) on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and delta(13)C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with contrasting rainfall patterns. During humid 2002, soil respiration rate was enhanced under elevated O(3) under beech and spruce, and was related to O(3)-stimulated fine-root production only in beech. During dry 2003, the stimulating effect of O(3) on soil respiration rate vanished under spruce, which was correlated with decreased fine-root production in spruce under drought, irrespective of the O(3) regime. delta(13)C signature of newly formed fine-roots was consistent with the differing g(s) of beech and spruce, and indicated stomatal limitation by O(3) in beech and by drought in spruce. Our study showed that drought can override the stimulating O(3) effects on fine-root dynamics and soil respiration in mature beech and spruce forests.
PubMed ID
19682778 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in forest productivity across Alaska consistent with biome shift.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101844
Source
Ecol Lett. 2011 Apr;14(4):373-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Pieter S A Beck
Glenn P Juday
Claire Alix
Valerie A Barber
Stephen E Winslow
Emily E Sousa
Patricia Heiser
James D Herriges
Scott J Goetz
Author Affiliation
Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA 02540, USA. pbeck@whrc.org
Source
Ecol Lett. 2011 Apr;14(4):373-9
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Droughts
Ecosystem
History, 20th Century
Picea - growth & development
Trees - growth & development
Abstract
Global vegetation models predict that boreal forests are particularly sensitive to a biome shift during the 21st century. This shift would manifest itself first at the biome's margins, with evergreen forest expanding into current tundra while being replaced by grasslands or temperate forest at the biome's southern edge. We evaluated changes in forest productivity since 1982 across boreal Alaska by linking satellite estimates of primary productivity and a large tree-ring data set. Trends in both records show consistent growth increases at the boreal-tundra ecotones that contrast with drought-induced productivity declines throughout interior Alaska. These patterns support the hypothesized effects of an initiating biome shift. Ultimately, tree dispersal rates, habitat availability and the rate of future climate change, and how it changes disturbance regimes, are expected to determine where the boreal biome will undergo a gradual geographic range shift, and where a more rapid decline.
PubMed ID
21332901 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate change: the next challenge for public mental health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262713
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
François Bourque
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Climate change
Disasters
Droughts
Environment
Floods
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Mental health
Public Health
Weather
Abstract
Climate change is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to human health of the 21st century, with consequences that mental health professionals are also likely to face. While physical health impacts have been increasingly emphasized in literature and practice, recent scholarly literature indicates that climate change and related weather events and environmental changes can profoundly impact psychological well-being and mental health through both direct and indirect pathways, particularly among those with pre-existing vulnerabilities or those living in ecologically sensitive areas. Although knowledge is still limited about the connections between climate change and mental health, evidence is indicating that impacts may be felt at both the individual and community levels, with mental health outcomes ranging from psychological distress, depression and anxiety, to increased addictions and suicide rates. Drawing on examples from diverse geographical areas, this article highlights some climate-sensitive impacts that may be encountered by mental health professionals. We then suggest potential avenues for public mental health in light of current and projected changes, in order to stimulate thought, debate, and action.
PubMed ID
25137107 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate sensitivity of reproduction in a mast-seeding boreal conifer across its distributional range from lowland to treeline forests.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257147
Source
Oecologia. 2014 Mar;174(3):665-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Carl A Roland
Joshua H Schmidt
Jill F Johnstone
Author Affiliation
National Park Service, Central Alaska Network, 4175 Geist Road, Fairbanks, AK, 99709, USA, carl_roland@nps.gov.
Source
Oecologia. 2014 Mar;174(3):665-77
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Altitude
Bayes Theorem
Climate
Climate change
Droughts
Ecosystem
Picea - physiology
Reproduction
Seeds - physiology
Temperature
Trees - physiology
Abstract
Mast-seeding conifers such as Picea glauca exhibit synchronous production of large seed crops over wide areas, suggesting climate factors as possible triggers for episodic high seed production. Rapidly changing climatic conditions may thus alter the tempo and spatial pattern of masting of dominant species with potentially far-reaching ecological consequences. Understanding the future reproductive dynamics of ecosystems including boreal forests, which may be dominated by mast-seeding species, requires identifying the specific cues that drive variation in reproductive output across landscape gradients and among years. Here we used annual data collected at three sites spanning an elevation gradient in interior Alaska, USA between 1986 and 2011 to produce the first quantitative models for climate controls over both seedfall and seed viability in P. glauca, a dominant boreal conifer. We identified positive associations between seedfall and increased summer precipitation and decreased summer warmth in all years except for the year prior to seedfall. Seed viability showed a contrasting response, with positive correlations to summer warmth in all years analyzed except for one, and an especially positive response to warm and wet conditions in the seedfall year. Finally, we found substantial reductions in reproductive potential of P. glauca at high elevation due to significantly reduced seed viability there. Our results indicate that major variation in the reproductive potential of this species may occur in different landscape positions in response to warming, with decreasing reproductive success in areas prone to drought stress contrasted with increasing success in higher elevation areas currently limited by cool summer temperatures.
PubMed ID
24213628 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparative proteomic responses of two bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.) varieties contrasting in drought stress resistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261345
Source
Plant Physiol Biochem. 2014 Sep;82:218-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Haitao Shi
Tiantian Ye
Zhulong Chan
Source
Plant Physiol Biochem. 2014 Sep;82:218-28
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cynodon - metabolism - physiology
Droughts
Gene Expression Regulation, Plant
Proteomics - methods
Abstract
Drought (water-deficit) stress is a serious environmental problem in plant growth and cultivation. As one of widely cultivated warm-season turfgrass, bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.) exhibits drastic natural variation in the drought stress resistance in leaves and stems of different varieties. In this study, proteomic analysis was performed to identify drought-responsive proteins in both leaves and stems of two bermudagrass varieties contrasting in drought stress resistance, including drought sensitive variety (Yukon) and drought tolerant variety (Tifgreen). Through comparative proteomic analysis, 39 proteins with significantly changed abundance were identified, including 3 commonly increased and 2 decreased proteins by drought stress in leaves and stems of Yukon and Tifgreen varieties, 2 differentially regulated proteins in leaves and stems of two varieties after drought treatment, 23 proteins increased by drought stress in Yukon variety and constitutively expressed in Tifgreen variety, and other 3 differentially expressed proteins under control and drought stress conditions. Among them, proteins involved in photosynthesis (PS), glycolysis, N-metabolism, tricarboxylicacid (TCA) and redox pathways were largely enriched, which might be contributed to the natural variation of drought resistance between Yukon and Tifgreen varieties. These studies provide new insights to understand the molecular mechanism underlying bermudagrass response to drought stress.
PubMed ID
24992888 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differential declines in Alaskan boreal forest vitality related to climate and competition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295904
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 03; 24(3):1097-1107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
03-2018
Author
Anna T Trugman
David Medvigy
William R L Anderegg
Stephen W Pacala
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 03; 24(3):1097-1107
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Droughts
Fires
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Taiga
Trees - growth & development
Abstract
Rapid warming and changes in water availability at high latitudes alter resource abundance, tree competition, and disturbance regimes. While these changes are expected to disrupt the functioning of boreal forests, their ultimate implications for forest composition are uncertain. In particular, recent site-level studies of the Alaskan boreal forest have reported both increases and decreases in productivity over the past few decades. Here, we test the idea that variations in Alaskan forest growth and mortality rates are contingent on species composition. Using forest inventory measurements and climate data from plots located throughout interior and south-central Alaska, we show significant growth and mortality responses associated with competition, midsummer vapor pressure deficit, and increased growing season length. The governing climate and competition processes differed substantially across species. Surprisingly, the most dramatic climate response occurred in the drought tolerant angiosperm species, trembling aspen, and linked high midsummer vapor pressure deficits to decreased growth and increased insect-related mortality. Given that species composition in the Alaskan and western Canadian boreal forests is projected to shift toward early-successional angiosperm species due to fire regime, these results underscore the potential for a reduction in boreal productivity stemming from increases in midsummer evaporative demand.
PubMed ID
29055122 View in PubMed
Less detail

Drought-induced stomatal closure probably cannot explain divergent white spruce growth in the Brooks Range, Alaska, USA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271944
Source
Ecology. 2016 Jan;97(1):145-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Annalis H Brownlee
Patrick F Sullivan
Adam Z Csank
Bjartmar Sveinbjörnsson
Sarah B Z Ellison
Source
Ecology. 2016 Jan;97(1):145-59
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon Isotopes
Climate
Droughts
Picea - growth & development - physiology
Plant Stomata - physiology
Plant Transpiration
Time Factors
Abstract
Increment cores from the boreal forest have long been used to reconstruct past climates. However, in recent years, numerous studies have revealed a deterioration of the correlation between temperature and tree growth that is commonly referred to as divergence. In the Brooks Range of northern Alaska, USA, studies of white spruce (Picea glauca) revealed that trees in the west generally showed positive growth trends, while trees in the central and eastern Brooks Range showed mixed and negative trends during late 20th century warming. The growing season climate of the eastern Brooks Range is thought to be drier than the west. On this basis, divergent tree growth in the eastern Brooks Range has been attributed to drought stress. To investigate the hypothesis that drought-induced stomatal closure can explain divergence in the Brooks Range, we synthesized all of the Brooks Range white spruce data available in the International Tree Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) and collected increment cores from our primary sites in each of four watersheds along a west-to-east gradient near the Arctic treeline. For cores from our sites, we measured ring widths and calculated carbon isotope discrimination (d13C), intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE), and needle intercellular CO2 concentration (C(i)) from d13C in tree-ring alpha-cellulose. We hypothesized that trees exhibiting divergence would show a corresponding decline in d13C, a decline in C(i), and a strong increase in iWUE. Consistent with the ITRDB data, trees at our western and central sites generally showed an increase in the strength of the temperature-growth correlation during late 20th century warming, while trees at our eastern site showed strong divergence. Divergent tree growth was not, however, associated with declining d13C. Meanwhile, estimates of C(i) showed a strong increase at all of our study sites, indicating that more substrate was available for photosynthesis in the early 21st than in the early 20th century. Our results, which are corroborated by measurements of xylem sap flux density, needle gas exchange, and measurements of growth and d13C along moisture gradients within each watershed, suggest that drought-induced stomatal closure is probably not the cause of 20th century divergence in the Brooks Range.
PubMed ID
27008784 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.