Skip header and navigation

Refine By

14 records – page 1 of 2.

The application of new molecular methods in the investigation of a waterborne outbreak of norovirus in Denmark, 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263184
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105053
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lieke B van Alphen
Frédérique Dorléans
Anna Charlotte Schultz
Jannik Fonager
Steen Ethelberg
Camilla Dalgaard
Marianne Adelhardt
Jørgen H Engberg
Thea Kølsen Fischer
Sofie Gillesberg Lassen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105053
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Capsid Proteins - chemistry - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Drinking Water - virology
Environmental monitoring
Genome, Viral
Norovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Phylogeny
Water Purification
Water supply
Abstract
In December 2012, an outbreak of acute gastrointestinal illness occurred in a geographical distinct area in Denmark covering 368 households. A combined microbiological, epidemiological and environmental investigation was initiated to understand the outbreak magnitude, pathogen(s) and vehicle in order to control the outbreak. Norovirus GII.4 New Orleans 2009 variant was detected in 15 of 17 individual stool samples from 14 households. Norovirus genomic material from water samples was detected and quantified and sequencing of longer parts of the viral capsid region (>1000 nt) were applied to patient and water samples. All five purposely selected water samples tested positive for norovirus GII in levels up to 1.8×10(4) genomic units per 200 ml. Identical norovirus sequences were found in all 5 sequenced stool samples and 1 sequenced water sample, a second sequenced water sample showed 1 nt (
Notes
Cites: Rev Med Virol. 2001 Jul-Aug;11(4):243-5211479930
Cites: J Virol Methods. 2002 Feb;100(1-2):107-1411742657
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2002 Aug;129(1):133-812211580
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2002 Aug;25(2):233-512367660
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1423-3312682125
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1548-5712682144
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Aug;131(1):737-4412948374
Cites: J Virol Methods. 2004 Mar 15;116(2):109-1714738976
Cites: J Med Virol. 2004 Mar;72(3):496-50114748075
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994 Oct;48(5):453-87964354
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Sep;79(17):5418-923926086
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2011 Jul;139(7):1105-1320843387
Cites: Res Microbiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;155(1):11-514759703
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2004 Feb 15;189(4):699-70514767824
Cites: Arch Virol. 2011 Sep;156(9):1641-621562879
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Aug;8(8):3468-7821909318
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2011 Oct;28(10):2731-921546353
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Feb;50(2):540-122090410
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2012 Jul;140(7):1161-7222444943
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2012 Aug;44(8):586-9422385125
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2012 Dec;140(12):2282-922400795
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2013;18(9). pii: 2041323470017
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1996 Nov;62(11):4268-728900022
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Jun;71(6):3163-7015933017
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2005 Sep 15;103(3):323-3015967530
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Nov;11(11):1716-2116318723
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 Jun;72(6):3846-5516751488
Cites: J Med Virol. 2006 Oct;78(10):1347-5316927293
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2006 Sep;44(9):3189-9516954246
Cites: J Med Virol. 2006 Nov;78(11):1486-9216998898
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2007 Mar;12(3):E070329.117439795
Cites: J Virol Methods. 2007 Jun;142(1-2):169-7317321606
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Aug;36(4):873-8017389718
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 May;13(5):786-818044044
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Mar;46(3):947-5318216210
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Oct;14(10):1553-718826818
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Feb;75(3):618-2419047383
Cites: J Virol Methods. 2009 Mar;156(1-2):59-6519041894
Cites: J Virol Methods. 2009 Mar;156(1-2):73-619056426
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2009 Aug;47(8):2411-819494060
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 1;200(5):802-1219627248
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2009 Nov;46(3):265-919695950
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Oct 29;361(18):1776-8519864676
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Dec;137(12):1713-2019534843
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2010 Mar;47(3):268-7220056481
Cites: J Virol Methods. 2010 Apr;165(1):57-6320100516
Cites: J Med Virol. 2010 Aug;82(8):1442-820572088
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Feb;49(2):602-621159934
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;69(3):240-421353945
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2011 Jun;51(2):121-521514213
PubMed ID
25222495 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of drinking water treatment and distribution network disturbances with Health Call Centre contacts for gastrointestinal illness symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113096
Source
Water Res. 2013 Sep 1;47(13):4474-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2013
Author
Annika Malm
Gösta Axelsson
Lars Barregard
Jakob Ljungqvist
Bertil Forsberg
Olof Bergstedt
Thomas J R Pettersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Sustainable Waste and Water, City of Gothenburg, Box 123, SE-424 23 Angered, Sweden. annika.malm@kretsloppochvatten.goteborg.se
Source
Water Res. 2013 Sep 1;47(13):4474-84
Date
Sep-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Drinking Water
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Sweden - epidemiology
Water Purification
Water supply
Abstract
There are relatively few studies on the association between disturbances in drinking water services and symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) illness. Health Call Centres data concerning GI illness may be a useful source of information. This study investigates if there is an increased frequency of contacts with the Health Call Centre (HCC) concerning gastrointestinal symptoms at times when there is a risk of impaired water quality due to disturbances at water works or the distribution network. The study was conducted in Gothenburg, a Swedish city with 0.5 million inhabitants with a surface water source of drinking water and two water works. All HCC contacts due to GI symptoms (diarrhoea, vomiting or abdominal pain) were recorded for a three-year period, including also sex, age, and geocoded location of residence. The number of contacts with the HCC in the affected geographical areas were recorded during eight periods of disturbances in the water works (e.g. short stops of chlorine dosing), six periods of large disturbances in the distribution network (e.g. pumping station failure or pipe breaks with major consequences), and 818 pipe break and leak repairs over a three-year period. For each period of disturbance the observed number of calls was compared with the number of calls during a control period without disturbances in the same geographical area. In total about 55, 000 calls to the HCC due to GI symptoms were recorded over the three-year period, 35 per 1000 inhabitants and year, but much higher (>200) for children
PubMed ID
23764597 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate-driven QMRA model for selected water supply systems in Norway accounting for raw water sources and treatment processes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298549
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Apr 10; 660:306-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-10-2019
Author
Hadi Mohammed
Razak Seidu
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Engineering Group, Department of Civil Engineering, Institute for Marine Operations and Civil Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Ålesund, Larsgårdsvegen 2, 6009 Ålesund, Norway. Electronic address: hadi.mohammed@tnu.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Apr 10; 660:306-320
Date
Apr-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Climate
Climate change
Cryptosporidium - physiology
Drinking Water - microbiology - parasitology - virology
Escherichia coli - physiology
Giardia - physiology
Linear Models
Microbiota - physiology
Models, Biological
Norovirus - physiology
Norway
Risk assessment
Water Microbiology
Water Purification
Water supply
Abstract
Formulating effective management intervention measures for water supply systems requires investigation of potential long-term impacts. This study applies an integrated multiple regression, random forest regression, and quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) modelling approach to assess the effect of climate-driven precipitation on pathogen infection risks in three drinking water treatment plants (WTPs) in Norway. Pathogen removal efficacies of treatment steps were calculated using process models. The results indicate that while the WTPs investigated generally meet the current water safety guidelines, risks of Norovirus and Cryptosporidium infection may be of concern in the future. The pathogen infections attributable to current projections of average precipitation in the study locations may be low. However, the pathogen increases in the drinking water sources due to the occurrence of extreme precipitation events in the catchments could substantially increase the risks of pathogen infections. In addition, without optimal operation of the UV disinfection steps in the WTPs, both the present and potential future infection risks could be high. Therefore, the QMRA models demonstrated the need for improved optimization of key treatment steps in the WTPs, as well as implementation of stringent regulations in protecting raw water sources in the country. The variety of models applied and the pathogen: E. coli used in the study introduce some uncertainties in the results, thus, management decisions that will be based on the results should consider these limitations. Nevertheless, the integration of predictive models with QMRA as applied in this study could be a useful method for climate impact assessment in the water supply industry.
PubMed ID
30640099 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early warning of changing drinking water quality by trend analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275153
Source
J Water Health. 2016 Jun;14(3):433-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Jani Tomperi
Esko Juuso
Kauko Leiviskä
Source
J Water Health. 2016 Jun;14(3):433-42
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking Water - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Models, Theoretical
Water Purification
Water Quality
Abstract
Monitoring and control of water treatment plants play an essential role in ensuring high quality drinking water and avoiding health-related problems or economic losses. The most common quality variables, which can be used also for assessing the efficiency of the water treatment process, are turbidity and residual levels of coagulation and disinfection chemicals. In the present study, the trend indices are developed from scaled measurements to detect warning signs of changes in the quality variables of drinking water and some operating condition variables that strongly affect water quality. The scaling is based on monotonically increasing nonlinear functions, which are generated with generalized norms and moments. Triangular episodes are classified with the trend index and its derivative. Deviation indices are used to assess the severity of situations. The study shows the potential of the described trend analysis as a predictive monitoring tool, as it provides an advantage over the traditional manual inspection of variables by detecting changes in water quality and giving early warnings.
PubMed ID
27280609 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ecological patterns, diversity and core taxa of microbial communities in groundwater-fed rapid gravity filters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286028
Source
ISME J. 2016 Sep;10(9):2209-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Arda Gülay
Sanin Musovic
Hans-Jørgen Albrechtsen
Waleed Abu Al-Soud
Søren J Sørensen
Barth F Smets
Source
ISME J. 2016 Sep;10(9):2209-22
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Biodiversity
DNA, Ribosomal - genetics
Denmark
Drinking Water - microbiology
Ecology
Filtration
Gravitation
Groundwater - microbiology
Iron - chemistry
Manganese - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Microbiota
Proteobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Water Purification
Abstract
Here, we document microbial communities in rapid gravity filtration units, specifically serial rapid sand filters (RSFs), termed prefilters (PFs) and after- filters (AFs), fed with anoxic groundwaters low in organic carbon to prepare potable waters. A comprehensive 16S rRNA-based amplicon sequencing survey revealed a core RSF microbiome comprising few bacterial taxa (29-30 genera) dominated by Nitrospirae, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria, with a strikingly high abundance (75-87?18%) across five examined waterworks in Denmark. Lineages within the Nitrospira genus consistently comprised the second most and most abundant fraction in PFs (27?23%) and AFs (45.2?23%), respectively, and were far more abundant than typical proteobacterial ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, suggesting a physiology beyond nitrite oxidation for Nitrospira. Within the core taxa, sequences closely related to types with ability to oxidize ammonium, nitrite, iron, manganese and methane as primary growth substrate were identified and dominated in both PFs (73.6?6%) and AFs (61.4?21%), suggesting their functional importance. Surprisingly, operational taxonomic unit richness correlated strongly and positively with sampling location in the drinking water treatment plant (from PFs to AFs), and a weaker negative correlation held for evenness. Significant spatial heterogeneity in microbial community composition was detected in both PFs and AFs, and was higher in the AFs. This is the first comprehensive documentation of microbial community diversity in RSFs treating oligotrophic groundwaters. We have identified patterns of local spatial heterogeneity and dispersal, documented surprising energy-diversity relationships, observed a large and diverse Nitrospira fraction and established a core RSF microbiome.
Notes
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Apr;75(7):2046-5619201974
Cites: ISME J. 2009 Jun;3(6):700-1419242531
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2012 Jan;14(1):4-1222004523
Cites: ISME J. 2012 Apr;6(4):724-3222071347
Cites: Nature. 2015 Dec 24;528(7583):504-926610024
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2000 Jun;15(6):223-22410802546
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2001 Nov;67(11):5273-8411679356
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2013 Jun 10;368(1622):2012038323754819
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2006 Mar;8(3):405-1516478447
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2012 Sep;78(17):6390-422752177
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Jul;75(14):4687-9519465520
Cites: BMC Bioinformatics. 2011 Jan 28;12:3821276213
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2011 Sep;77(17):6295-30021764958
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Jul 27;107(30):13479-8420624973
Cites: Microb Ecol. 1999 Nov;38(4):377-38610758184
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2014 Aug;80(16):4854-6424907315
Cites: ISME J. 2015 Aug;9(8):1846-5625647349
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1999 Aug;65(8):3690-610427067
Cites: Nature. 2009 May 14;459(7244):193-919444205
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2014 Nov;80(22):7010-2025192987
Cites: Water Res. 2013 Oct 15;47(16):6380-724091186
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Feb 20;104(8):2761-617296935
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2006 Jun;56(Pt 6):1331-4016738111
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Dec;71(12):8611-716332854
Cites: ISME J. 2015 Mar;9(3):643-5525148481
Cites: ISME J. 2015 May;9(5):1177-9425350160
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2010 Aug;38(15):e15520547594
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2010 Feb;12(2):315-2619807778
Cites: PLoS One. 2010 Aug 26;5(8):e1241420865128
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2014 Oct;16(10):3055-7124118804
Cites: Nat Methods. 2010 May;7(5):335-620383131
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jan 20;49(2):839-4625522137
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2007 Feb;16(4):867-8017284217
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(1):e2997322253843
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Oct;81(19):6864-7226209671
Cites: Water Res. 2014 Nov 1;64:226-3625068473
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2015 Sep;17(9):3154-6725534614
Cites: ISME J. 2016 Jan;10(1):11-2026262816
Cites: ISME J. 2014 Jan;8(1):187-21124030599
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2004 Feb;70(2):845-914766563
Cites: ISME J. 2010 Nov;4(11):1357-6520535220
Cites: Nat Biotechnol. 2013 Sep;31(9):814-2123975157
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1999 Apr;65(4):1731-710103274
Cites: Nature. 2015 Dec 24;528(7583):555-926610025
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2011 Feb;28(2):1083-9721037205
Cites: ISME J. 2012 Jun;6(6):1137-4722170428
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2001 Dec;67(12):5791-80011722936
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 Mar;72(3):1858-7216517632
Cites: Nature. 2000 May 11;405(6783):220-710821282
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2013 Sep;85(3):612-2623678985
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Aug 21;46(16):8851-922793041
Cites: J Environ Sci (China). 2012;24(9):1587-9323520865
Cites: Water Res. 2009 Jan;43(1):182-9418995879
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1997 Sep 1;25(17):3389-4029254694
Cites: Chemosphere. 2015 Nov;138:47-5926037816
PubMed ID
26953601 View in PubMed
Less detail

Household water insecurity and its cultural dimensions: preliminary results from Newtok, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297660
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32938-32951
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Laura Eichelberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at San Antonio, College of Liberal and Fine Arts, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX, 78249-1644, USA. Laura.eichelberger@utsa.edu.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32938-32951
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Alaska Natives
Culture
Drinking Water
Female
Humans
Male
Poverty
Social Networking
Water Purification
Water supply
Abstract
Using a relational approach, I examine several cultural dimensions involved in household water access and use in Newtok, Alaska. I describe the patterns that emerge around domestic water access and use, as well as the subjective lived experiences of water insecurity including risk perceptions, and the daily work and hydro-social relationships involved in accessing water from various sources. I found that Newtok residents haul water in limited amounts from a multitude of sources, both treated and untreated, throughout the year. Household water access is tied to hydro-social relationships predicated on sharing and reciprocity, particularly when the primary treated water access point is unavailable. Older boys and young men are primarily responsible for hauling water, and this role appears to be important to male Yupik identity. Many interviewees described preferring to drink untreated water, a practice that appears related to cultural constructions of natural water sources as pure and self-purifying, as well as concerns about the safety of treated water. Concerns related to the health consequences of low water access appear to differ by gender and age, with women and elders expressing greater concern than men. These preliminary results point to the importance of understanding the cultural dimensions involved in household water access and use. I argue that institutional responses to water insecurity need to incorporate such cultural dimensions into solutions aimed at increasing household access to and use of water.
PubMed ID
28634806 View in PubMed
Less detail

The INCA-Pathogens model: An application to the Loimijoki River basin in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290776
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Dec 01; 572:1611-1621
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
K Rankinen
D Butterfield
M Faneca Sànchez
B Grizzetti
P Whitehead
T Pitkänen
J Uusi-Kämppä
H Leckie
Author Affiliation
Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), Mechelininkatu 34a, FI 00250 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: katri.rankinen@ymparisto.fi.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Dec 01; 572:1611-1621
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Drinking Water - microbiology
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Models, Theoretical
Rivers - microbiology
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Purification
Water supply
Abstract
Good hygienic quality of surface waters is essential for drinking water production, irrigation of crops and recreation. Predictions of how and when microbes are transported by rivers are needed to protect downstream water users. In this study we tested the new process-based INCA-Pathogens model in the agricultural Loimijoki River basin (3138km2) in Finland, and we quantified ecosystem services of water purification and water provisioning for drinking and recreation purposes under different scenarios. INCA is a catchment scale process based model to calculate pollutant transfer from terrestrial environment and point sources to the catchment outlet. A clear gradient was observed in the numbers of faecal coliforms along the River Loimijoki. The highest bacterial counts were detected in the middle part of the main stream immediately after small industries and municipal sewage treatment plants. In terms of model performance, the INCA-Pathogen model was able to produce faecal coliform counts and seasonality both in the low pollution level sampling points and in the high pollution level sampling points. The model was sensitive to the parameters defining light decay in river water and in soil compartment, as well as to the amount of faecal coliforms in the manure spread on the fields. The modeling results showed that the number of faecal coliforms repeatedly exceeded 1000 bacteria 100ml-1. Moreover, results lead to the following conclusions: 1) Climate change does not cause a major threat to hygienic water quality as higher precipitation increases runoff and causes diluting effect in the river, 2) Intensification of agriculture is not a threat as long as animal density remains relatively low and environmental legislation is followed, 3) More intensive agriculture without environmental legislation causes a threat especially in tributaries with high field percentage and animal density, and 4) Hygienic water quality in the River Loimijoki can best be improved by improving sewage treatment. We conclude that this catchment scale model is a useful tool for addressing catchment management and water treatment planning issues.
PubMed ID
27302375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Micropollutants in drinking water from source to tap - Method development and application of a multiresidue screening method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298877
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jun 15; 627:1404-1432
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-15-2018
Author
Rikard Tröger
Philipp Klöckner
Lutz Ahrens
Karin Wiberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Box 7050, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: rikard.troger@slu.se.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jun 15; 627:1404-1432
Date
Jun-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Chromatography, Liquid
Drinking Water - chemistry
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Limit of Detection
Pesticides
Solid Phase Extraction
Sweden
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification
Abstract
A multi-residue screening method for simultaneous measurement of a wide range of micropollutants in drinking water (DW) resources was developed. The method was applied in a field study in central Sweden on water from source to tap, including samples of surface water (upstream and downstream of a wastewater treatment plant, WWTP), intake water before and after a DW treatment plant (DWTP, pilot and full-scale), treated DW leaving the plant and tap water at end users. Low detection limits (low ng?L-1 levels) were achieved by using large sample volumes (5 L) combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS). In total, 134 different micropollutants were analyzed, including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), drug-related compounds, food additives, and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). Of these 134 micropollutants, 41 were detected in at least one sample, with individual concentrations ranging from sub ng?L-1 levels to ~80?ng?L-1. Two solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges (Oasis HLB and Bond-Elut ENV) were shown to be complementary in the field study, with three compounds detected exclusively using HLB. The total concentration in treated drinking water (56-57?ng?L-1) was at a similar level as upstream from the WWTP (79-90?ng?L-1). The composition of micropollutants changed along the water path, to a higher fraction of food additives and PFASs. Median treatment efficiency in the full-scale DWTP was close to 0%, but with high variability for individual compounds. In contrast, median treatment efficiency in the pilot-scale DWTP was ~90% when using nanofiltration followed by a freshly installed granulated active carbon (GAC) filter.
PubMed ID
30857104 View in PubMed
Less detail

Monitoring for contaminants of emerging concern in drinking water using POCIS passive samplers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104968
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 Mar;16(3):473-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Chris Metcalfe
M Ehsanul Hoque
Tamanna Sultana
Craig Murray
Paul Helm
Sonya Kleywegt
Author Affiliation
Water Quality Centre, Trent University, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B8, Canada. cmetcalfe@trentu.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 Mar;16(3):473-81
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drinking Water - chemistry
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification
Abstract
Contaminants of emerging concern (CEC) have been detected in drinking water world-wide. The source of most of these compounds is generally attributed to contamination from municipal wastewater. Traditional water sampling methods (grab or composite) often require the concentration of large amounts of water in order to detect trace levels of these contaminants. The Polar Organic Compounds Integrative Sampler (POCIS) is a passive sampling technology that has been developed to concentrate trace levels of CEC to provide time-weighted average concentrations for individual compounds in water. However, few studies to date have evaluated whether POCIS is suitable for monitoring contaminants in drinking water. In this study, the POCIS was evaluated as a monitoring tool for CEC in drinking water over a period of 2 and 4 weeks with comparisons to typical grab samples. Seven "indicator compounds" which included carbamazepine, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, estrone and sucralose, were monitored in five drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) in Ontario. All indicator compounds were detected in raw water samples from the POCIS in comparison to six from grab samples. Similarly, four compounds were detected in grab samples of treated drinking water, whereas six were detected in the POCIS. Sucralose was the only compound that was detected consistently at all five plants. The POCIS technique provided integrative exposures of CECs in drinking water at lower detection limits, while episodic events were captured via traditional sampling methods. There was evidence that the accumulation of target compounds by POCIS is a dynamic process, with adsorption and desorption on the sorbent occurring in response to ambient levels of the target compounds in water. CECs in treated drinking water were present at low ng L(-1) concentrations, which are not considered to be a threat to human health.
PubMed ID
24531237 View in PubMed
Less detail

A One Year Study on the Concentrations of Norovirus and Enteric Adenoviruses in Wastewater and A Surface Drinking Water Source in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278837
Source
Food Environ Virol. 2014 Dec;6(4):232-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Ricardo C Grøndahl-Rosado
Ekaterina Yarovitsyna
Elin Trettenes
Mette Myrmel
Lucy J Robertson
Source
Food Environ Virol. 2014 Dec;6(4):232-45
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviruses, Human - classification - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
DNA, Viral - isolation & purification - metabolism
Drinking Water - virology
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Limit of Detection
Molecular Typing
Norovirus - classification - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Norway
RNA, Viral - isolation & purification - metabolism
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Reproducibility of Results
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rivers
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Waste Water - virology
Water Microbiology
Water Purification
Water Resources
Water supply
Abstract
Enteric viruses transmitted via the faecal-oral route occur in high concentrations in wastewater and may contaminate drinking water sources and cause disease. In order to quantify enteric adenovirus and norovirus genotypes I and II (GI and GII) impacting a drinking source in Norway, samples of surface water (52), wastewater inlet (64) and outlet (59) were collected between January 2011 and April 2012. Samples were concentrated in two steps, using an electropositive disc filter and polyethylene glycol precipitation, followed by nucleic acid extraction and analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Virus was detected in 47/52 (90.4%) of surface water, 59/64 (92%) of wastewater inlet and 55/59 (93%) of wastewater outlet samples. Norovirus GI occurred in the highest concentrations in surface water (2.51e + 04) and adenovirus in wastewater (2.15e + 07). While adenovirus was the most frequently detected in all matrices, norovirus GI was more frequently detected in surface water and norovirus GII in wastewater. This study is the first in Norway to monitor both sewage and a drinking water source in parallel, and confirms the year-round presence of norovirus and adenovirus in a Norwegian drinking water source.
PubMed ID
25086639 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.