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159 records – page 1 of 16.

[100 years of drinking water regulation. Retrospective review, current situation and prospects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104086
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Mar-Apr;(2):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yu A Rakhmanin
G N Krasovsky
N A Egorova
R I Mikhailova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Mar-Apr;(2):5-18
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking Water - standards
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - history - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Abstract
There is considered the history of the development of legislative requirements to the regulation of the quality of drinking water in different countries and international organizations during the period from 1912 to the present time. In terms of comparative analysis there is analyzed the current state of regulatory frameworks of the Russian Federation, WHO, EU, Finland, the UK, Singapore, Australia, Japan, China, Nigeria, the United States and Canada in the field of providing favorable conditions of population drinking water use. There has been noted the significant progress in standardization of the content of the biogenic elements and chemical pollution of drinking water in the absence of uniform requirements to the composition and properties of drinking water globally, that is bound to the need to take into account the national peculiarities of drinking water supply within the separate countries. As promising directions for improving regulation of drinking water quality there are noted: the development of new standards for prioritized water pollution, periodic review ofstandards after appearance of the new scientific data on the biological action of substances, the use of the concept of risk, the harmonization of the normative values and the assessment of the possibility of introduction into the practice the one more criterion of profitableness of population water use--the bioenergetic state of the water.
PubMed ID
25051731 View in PubMed
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Affordable and efficient adsorbent for arsenic removal from rural water supply systems in Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298550
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Apr 10; 660:158-168
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-10-2019
Author
Javid Shadbahr
Tahir Husain
Author Affiliation
EnviroRisk International, Inc., 36 Pearson Street, St. John's, NL A1A 3R1, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Apr 10; 660:158-168
Date
Apr-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Arsenic - analysis
Coal Ash - chemistry
Drinking Water - analysis
Newfoundland and Labrador
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification - instrumentation
Water Wells
Abstract
The fly ash from the Corner Brook Pulp and Paper (CBPP) mill was used in this study as the raw material for the preparation of a low-cost adsorbent for arsenic removal from the well water of Bell Island. The CBPP fly ash was physically activated in two different ways: (a) activation with pure CO2 (CAC) with the iodine number and methylene value of 704.53?mg/g and 292.32?mg/g, respectively; and (b) activation with a mixture of CO2 and steam (CSAC) with the iodine number and methylene value of 1119.98?mg/g and 358.95?mg/g, respectively, at the optimized temperature of 850?°C and the time of 2?h for both activations. The BET surface areas of the CAC and CSAC at the optimized conditions were 847.26?m2/g and 1146.25?m2/g, respectively. The optimized CSAC was used for impregnation with iron (III) chloride (FeCl3) with different concentrations (0.01?M to 1?M). The study shows that the adsorbent impregnated with 0.1?M FeCl3 is the most efficient adsorbent for arsenic removal. Isotherm analysis shows that the Langmuir model better describes the equilibrium behavior of the arsenic adsorption from both local well water and synthesized water compared to the other models. The maximum arsenic adsorption capacity was 35.6?µg/g of carbon for local well water and 1428.6?µg/g of carbon for synthesized water. Furthermore, the kinetic behavior of arsenic adsorption from synthesized and local well water was well depicted by the pseudo-second order kinetic model.
PubMed ID
30639713 View in PubMed
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[Algolization of drinkable water basins in Nizhny Tagil industrial complex].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271934
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2016;(1):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
V V Kul'nev
V A Pochechun
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2016;(1):20-2
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking Water - standards
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Extraction and Processing Industry
Humans
Russia
Abstract
The article covers experience of biologic rehabilitation through correction of algocenosis (algolization) of drinkable water basins in Nizhny Tagil industrial complex. Biologic rehabilitation of Chernoistochnik and Verhne-Vyisky drinkable water basins in 2011-2012 considerably improved water quality in ecologic hydrochemical and hydrobiologic parameters--that was proved by absent water contamination with blue-green algae, lower saprobiont index. Results also are significant lower concentration of pollutants--heavy metals (ferrum, manganese, copper), oil products, decreased odor and and better water quality in hydrochemical parameters to second class according to water pollution index.
PubMed ID
27048137 View in PubMed
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[Algorithm for complex control and radiation-hygienic evaluation of the quality of underground drinking water in the Moscow region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107502
Source
Gig Sanit. 2013 Mar-Apr;(2):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
N V Klochkova
I P Korenkov
T N Lashchenova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2013 Mar-Apr;(2):11-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Drinking Water - standards
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Groundwater - standards
Humans
Moscow
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Abstract
On the basis of assessing the quality of underground drinking water in the Moscow region, selected and justified in the process of radiation-ecological monitoring of water quality control criteria of the underground water sources in the region are encouraged to develop an algorithm for complete monitoring and assessing the quality of underground drinking water in the Moscow region on indicators of radiation and chemical safety, presented in a scheme.
PubMed ID
24003690 View in PubMed
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American Public Health Association (APHA): Climate Change Section

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288400
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
American Public Health Association (APHA)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Climate change
Drinking Water
Weather
Abstract
APHA is concerned with the public health implications of climate change-from changes in vector-borne diseases to impacts on drinking water supply to extreme weather events.
Online Resources
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Amoeba-related health risk in drinking water systems: could monitoring of amoebae be a complementary approach to current quality control strategies?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128547
Source
Future Microbiol. 2012 Jan;7(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Francesc Codony
Leonardo Martín Pérez
Bárbara Adrados
Gemma Agustí
Mariana Fittipaldi
Jordi Morató
Author Affiliation
Laboratori de Microbiologia Sanitaria i Mediambiental & Aquasost - UNESCO Chair in Sustainability, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Edifici Gaia, Pg. Ernest Lluch/Rambla Sant Nebridi, Terrassa - 08222, Barcelona, Spain. codony@oo.upc.edu
Source
Future Microbiol. 2012 Jan;7(1):25-31
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amoeba - genetics - isolation & purification - microbiology
Bacteria - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - microbiology - prevention & control
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena
Drinking Water - microbiology - parasitology
Feces - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution - analysis
Abstract
Culture-based methods for fecal indicator microorganisms are the standard protocol to assess potential health risk from drinking water systems. However, these traditional fecal indicators are inappropriate surrogates for disinfection-resistant fecal pathogens and the indigenous pathogens that grow in drinking water systems. There is now a range of molecular-based methods, such as quantitative PCR, which allow detection of a variety of pathogens and alternative indicators. Hence, in addition to targeting total Escherichia coli (i.e., dead and alive) for the detection of fecal pollution, various amoebae may be suitable to indicate the potential presence of pathogenic amoeba-resisting microorganisms, such as Legionellae. Therefore, monitoring amoeba levels by quantitative PCR could be a useful tool for directly and indirectly evaluating health risk and could also be a complementary approach to current microbial quality control strategies for drinking water systems.
PubMed ID
22191444 View in PubMed
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An extensive gastroenteritis outbreak after drinking-water contamination by sewage effluent, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140788
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2011 Jul;139(7):1105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
J. Laine
E. Huovinen
M J Virtanen
M. Snellman
J. Lumio
P. Ruutu
E. Kujansuu
R. Vuento
T. Pitkänen
I. Miettinen
J. Herrala
O. Lepistö
J. Antonen
J. Helenius
M-L Hänninen
L. Maunula
J. Mustonen
M. Kuusi
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2011 Jul;139(7):1105-13
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Drinking Water - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sewage - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
An inappropriate cross-connection between sewage- and drinking-water pipelines contaminated tap water in a Finnish town, resulting in an extensive waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak in this developed country. According to a database and a line-list, altogether 1222 subjects sought medical care as a result of this exposure. Seven pathogens were found in patient samples of those who sought treatment. To establish the true disease burden from this exposure, we undertook a population-based questionnaire investigation with a control population, infrequently used to study waterborne outbreaks. The study covered three areas, contaminated and uncontaminated parts of the town and a control town. An estimated 8453 residents fell ill during the outbreak, the excess number of illnesses being 6501. Attack rates were 53% [95% confidence interval (CI) 49.5-56.4] in the contaminated area, 15.6% (95% CI 13.1-18.5) in the uncontaminated area and 6.5% (95% CI 4.8-8.8) in the control population. Using a control population allowed us to differentiate baseline morbidity from the observed morbidity caused by the water contamination, thus enabling a more accurate estimate of the disease burden of this outbreak.
PubMed ID
20843387 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic resistance in environmental Escherichia coli - a simple screening method for simultaneous typing and resistance determination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260756
Source
J Water Health. 2014 Dec;12(4):692-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Patricia Colque Navarro
Heriberto Fernandez
Roland Möllby
Laura Otth
Madeleine Tiodolf
Myra Wilson
Inger Kühn
Source
J Water Health. 2014 Dec;12(4):692-701
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Chile
Drinking Water - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - chemistry - drug effects - genetics
Hospitals
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - methods
Norway
Sewage - microbiology
Sweden
Abstract
We describe a simple and standardised screening system (AREB) for surveillance of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. The system consists of 96 well microplates containing eight sets of breakpoint amounts of 10 different antibiotics. The incubated microplates are read by a desktop scanner and the plate images are analysed by special software that automatically presents the resistance data. The AREB method is combined with a rapid typing method, the PhenePlate system, which yields information on the diversity of the bacteria in the studied samples, and on the possible prevalence of resistant clones. In order to demonstrate the usage of AREB, a comparative study on the resistance situation among 970 Escherichia coli isolates from sewage and recipient water in Sweden, Norway and Chile, was performed. Resistance rates to all antibiotics were markedly higher in hospital sewage than in other samples. Our data indicate that the AREB system is useful for comparing resistance rates among E. coli and other environmental indicator bacteria in different countries/regions. Simple handling and automatic data evaluation, combined with low cost, facilitate large studies involving several thousands of isolates.
PubMed ID
25473978 View in PubMed
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Applicability of energy-positive net-zero water management in Alaska: technology status and case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297642
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):33025-33037
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Tingting Wu
James D Englehardt
Tianjiao Guo
Lucien Gassie
Aaron Dotson
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 5000 Technology Drive, Huntsville, AL, 35899, USA. Tingting.Wu@uah.edu.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):33025-33037
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cities
Drinking Water
Humans
Population Density
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - economics - methods
Water Purification - economics - methods
Water Supply - economics
Abstract
Challenges of water and wastewater management in Alaska include the potential need for above-grade and freeze-protected piping, high unit energy costs and, in many rural areas, low population density and median annual income. However, recently developed net-zero water (NZW), i.e., nearly closed-loop, direct potable water reuse systems, can retain the thermal energy in municipal wastewater, producing warm treated potable water without the need for substantial water re-heating, heat pumping or transfer, or additional energy conversion. Consequently, these systems are projected to be capable of saving more energy than they use in water treatment and conveyance, in the temperate USA. In this paper, NZW technology is reviewed in terms of potential applicability in Alaska by performing a hypothetical case study for the city of Fairbanks, Alaska. Results of this paper study indicate that in municipalities of Alaska with local engineering and road access, the use of NZW systems may provide an energy-efficient water service option. In particular, case study modeling suggests hot water energy savings are equivalent to five times the energy used for treatment, much greater savings than in mid-latitudes, due largely to the substantially higher energy needed for heating water from a conventional treatment system and lack of need for freeze-protected piping. Further study of the applicability of NZW technology in cold regions, with expanded evaluation in terms of system-wide lifecycle cost, is recommended.
PubMed ID
29168139 View in PubMed
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The application of new molecular methods in the investigation of a waterborne outbreak of norovirus in Denmark, 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263184
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105053
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lieke B van Alphen
Frédérique Dorléans
Anna Charlotte Schultz
Jannik Fonager
Steen Ethelberg
Camilla Dalgaard
Marianne Adelhardt
Jørgen H Engberg
Thea Kølsen Fischer
Sofie Gillesberg Lassen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105053
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Capsid Proteins - chemistry - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Drinking Water - virology
Environmental monitoring
Genome, Viral
Norovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Phylogeny
Water Purification
Water supply
Abstract
In December 2012, an outbreak of acute gastrointestinal illness occurred in a geographical distinct area in Denmark covering 368 households. A combined microbiological, epidemiological and environmental investigation was initiated to understand the outbreak magnitude, pathogen(s) and vehicle in order to control the outbreak. Norovirus GII.4 New Orleans 2009 variant was detected in 15 of 17 individual stool samples from 14 households. Norovirus genomic material from water samples was detected and quantified and sequencing of longer parts of the viral capsid region (>1000 nt) were applied to patient and water samples. All five purposely selected water samples tested positive for norovirus GII in levels up to 1.8×10(4) genomic units per 200 ml. Identical norovirus sequences were found in all 5 sequenced stool samples and 1 sequenced water sample, a second sequenced water sample showed 1 nt (
Notes
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PubMed ID
25222495 View in PubMed
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159 records – page 1 of 16.