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Canadian mock juror attitudes and decisions in domestic violence cases involving asian and white interracial and intraracial couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121202
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2013 Mar;28(4):667-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Evelyn M Maeder
Annik Mossière
Liann Cheung
Author Affiliation
Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada. evelyn_maeder@carleton.ca
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2013 Mar;28(4):667-84
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Attitude
Canada
Crime Victims - psychology
Decision Making
Domestic Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Emotions
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Prejudice - psychology
Sex Distribution
Social Perception
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study manipulated the race of the defendant and the victim (White/White, White/Asian, Asian/Asian, and Asian/White) in a domestic violence case to examine the potential prejudicial impact of race on juror decision making. A total of 181 undergraduate students read a trial transcript involving an allegation of spousal abuse in which defendant and victim race were manipulated using photographs. They then provided a verdict and confidence rating, a sentence, and responsibility attributions, and completed various scales measuring attitudes toward wife abuse and women. Findings revealed that female jurors were harsher toward the defendant than were male jurors. When controlling for attitudes toward Asians, jurors found the defendant guilty more often in cases involving interracial couples, as compared to same-race couples. Path analyses revealed various factors and attitudes involved in domestic violence trial outcomes. Findings contribute to the scarce literature on legal proceedings involving Asians, particularly in domestic violence cases. Outcomes also provide a model for relevant factors and characteristics of jurors in domestic violence cases. Roadblocks inherent in jury research are also discussed.
PubMed ID
22929345 View in PubMed
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Fratricide: a forensic psychiatric perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165970
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2006;34(4):529-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Dominique Bourget
Pierre Gagné
Author Affiliation
Psychiatry, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dbourget@rohcg.on.ca
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2006;34(4):529-33
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholic Intoxication - diagnosis - psychology
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Expert Testimony - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Homicide - psychology
Humans
Insanity Defense
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Middle Aged
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siblings
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
Analyses of fratricide rates based on national homicide data have provided some general information pertaining to offenders and victims of sibling homicide but are limited by data constraints to examining a few major variables. Exploring fratricide from a forensic psychiatric perspective could uncover other related factors and provide insight into why some individuals murder their siblings. In a retrospective study of data from coroners' files on domestic homicide pertaining to individuals killed by their siblings over a 10-year period in Quebec, Canada, we identified several specific offender and victim characteristics and circumstances surrounding offenses. The impact of mental illness and substance abuse on fratricidal behavior is indicated, underscoring the importance of identifying existing psychopathology. From a forensic psychiatric perspective, we identify characteristic patterns and discuss potential dynamics operating in fratricide. We raise some issues relevant to treatment and prevention, including the fact that most cases are alcohol-related, impulsive, and unpredictable until the moment they occur.
PubMed ID
17185484 View in PubMed
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Maternal and paternal filicides: a retrospective review of filicides in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142910
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2010;38(2):229-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anne Kauppi
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Kari Karkola
Tuija Vanamo
Juhani Merikanto
Author Affiliation
University of Eastern Finland, Pirkankatu 21 b 33, 33230, Tampere, Finland. anne.kauppi@kolumbus.fi
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2010;38(2):229-38
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Battered Child Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Expert Testimony - legislation & jurisprudence
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Homicide - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infanticide - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Insanity Defense - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Retrospective Studies
Suicide - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this retrospective study was to illustrate the differences in maternal and paternal filicides in Finland during a 25-year period. In the sample of 200 filicides [neonaticides (n = 56), filicide-suicides (n = 75), other filicides (n = 69)], the incidence was 5.09 deaths per 100,000 live births: 59 percent of filicides were committed by mothers, 39 percent by fathers, and 2 percent by stepfathers. The mean age of the maternal victims (1.6 y) was significantly lower than that of the paternal victims (5.6 y), but no correlation between the sex of the victim and the sex of the perpetrator was found, and the number of female and male victims was equal. The sample of other filicides (n = 65) was studied more closely by forensic psychiatric examination and review of collateral files. Filicidal mothers showed mental distress and often had psychosocial stressors of marital discord and lack of support. They often killed for altruistic reasons and in association with suicide. Maternal perpetrators also dominated in filicide cases in which death was caused by a single episode or recurrent episodes of battering. Psychosis and psychotic depression were diagnosed in 51 percent of the maternal perpetrators, and 76 percent of the mothers were deemed not responsible for their actions by reason of insanity. Paternal perpetrators, on the other hand, were jealous of their mates, had a personality disorder (67%), abused alcohol (45%), or were violent toward their mates. In 18 percent of the cases, they were not held responsible for their actions by reason of insanity. During childhood, most of the perpetrators had endured emotional abuse from their parents or guardians, some of whom also engaged in alcohol abuse and domestic violence. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between maternal and paternal filicides in a sample of 200 cases in Finland. This report also provides a psychosocial profile of the perpetrator and victim in 65 filicides and a discussion of the influence of diagnoses on decisions regarding criminal responsibility.
PubMed ID
20542944 View in PubMed
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[Maternal health services must give cause for and explain routine questions concerning violence and abuse]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49140
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 8;101(1-2):132-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-2004
Author
Kerstin Andersson
Author Affiliation
Teologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet. Kerstin.Andersson@teol.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 8;101(1-2):132-3
Date
Jan-8-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Domestic Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Female
Humans
Maternal health services
Pregnancy
Sweden
PubMed ID
14763019 View in PubMed
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Predicting violent behavior in stalkers: a preliminary investigation of Canadian cases in criminal harassment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192495
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2001 Nov;46(6):1403-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
K A Morrison
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2001 Nov;46(6):1403-10
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Domestic Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Obsessive Behavior - prevention & control - psychology
Social Behavior
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
This study examined the factors associated with violent/aggressive behavior in stalkers using a sample of 100 Canadian cases of persons charged with criminal harassment (more commonly known as stalking). Results revealed that the typical profile of a "simple obsessional" type of stalker was a middle-aged male, single or separated/estranged, with a history of emotional and/or anger management problems. The most common initial strategies used by the victims to cope with the stalkers were oriented towards legal resources. Initial legal remedies, including court orders or police warnings, seemed to be ineffective as a strategy to stop stalking given that most stalkers chose to ignore them. The study also provided partial support for a preliminary model of predictors of violent/aggressive behavior in stalkers. Stalkers with previous violent behaviors, strong negative emotions. and obsessional tendencies toward the victim may be most at risk of future violent and aggressive acts.
Notes
Erratum In: J Forensic Sci 2002 May;47(3):714
PubMed ID
11714152 View in PubMed
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