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Abuse policies for healthcare institutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211295
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1996 Sep-Oct;5(5):36-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Kohm
M J McNally
J. Tiivel
Author Affiliation
Toronto Hospital.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1996 Sep-Oct;5(5):36-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Domestic Violence
Elder Abuse - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Ontario
Organizational Policy
Abstract
Few hospitals have standard approaches to recognizing and treating victims of abuse. When staff at the Toronto Hospital realized they had no guidelines for handling such cases, they formed a task force to research the issue. The result was a set of policies and procedures which clearly outline the duties of staff who suspect abuse and, at the same time, make clear the hospital's role in addressing this serious issue.
PubMed ID
10161457 View in PubMed
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Abusive relationships in families of women with borderline personality disorder, anorexia nervosa and a control group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193394
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. Laporte
H. Guttman
Author Affiliation
Allan Memorial Institute, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nuclear Family - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
In a group of intact families, we examined the rates and parameters of verbal, physical, and sexual abuse in 35 women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), 34 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), and 33 women without a clinical history (NC); their experience of multiple abuse and its correlation with their SCL-90-R scores; and their reports of abuse of their siblings. Corroboration of abuse was obtained from some parents in each group. Women with BPD suffered more intrafamilial verbal and physical abuse. Whereas AN and NC women experienced relatively rare single events of extrafamilial sexual abuse at an older age, those with BPD suffered repeated intrafamilial sexual abuse at a younger age and also suffered more multiple abuse. All multiply abused women had more psychopathology. Siblings were reported abused in the same proportions as subjects; many parents of BPDs corroborated their daughters' reports of all three forms of abuse.
PubMed ID
11531204 View in PubMed
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Action plan for interpersonal violence prevention in Anchorage, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100758
Publication Type
Report
Date
Apr-2003
  1 website  
Author
Municipality of Anchorage Department of Health and Human Services, Social Services Division, SAFE City Program
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Anchorage, Alaska
Domestic Violence
Monitoring
Prevention
Sexual assault and rape
Abstract
Released in June 2001, Anchorage?s Domestic Violence Action Plan is the community?s primary tool to address domestic violence and related sexual assault in Anchorage, Alaska. The Action Plan was developed under the leadership of the Anchorage Women?s Commission, Special Committee on Domestic Violence. The Special Committee was comprised of local and state interpersonal violence prevention providers, criminal justice officials, policymakers, health and human service providers, survivors of interpersonal violence, and other professionals and private citizens from Anchorage?s diverse community. Over a three-month period, the Special Committee developed a framework with local leaders that recognize and work within Anchorage?s rich multi-cultural community.
Online Resources
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Action research: a hospital responds to domestic violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182841
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(3):18-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Robin A Mason
Author Affiliation
Violence and Health Research Program, Centre for Research in Women's Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(3):18-22
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Domestic Violence
Female
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario
Planning Techniques
Women's health
Abstract
Using action-research methods and the principles of community development, a small working group initiated an organization-wide process to sensitize the Sunnybrook and Women's College hospital community to the relationship between violence and women's health. In this article, we explore the process by which the initiative was successfully introduced into the newly merged hospital. We describe critical factors for the initiative's success and offer some suggestions on how to maximize opportunities for organizational change.
PubMed ID
14618828 View in PubMed
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Act No. 223, amending the Marriage and Divorce Act, 22 April 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38577
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:72
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Crime
Denmark
Developed Countries
Divorce
Domestic Violence
Europe
Legislation
Marriage
Scandinavia
Social Problems
Abstract
This Law amends the Marriage and Divorce Act of Denmark to provide that a spouse has the right to obtain a divorce when the other spouse deliberately has committed serious violence toward the first spouse or the children.
PubMed ID
12289667 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' experiences of coping with domestic violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142880
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Jun;66(6):1232-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Sari Lepistö
Päivi Astedt-Kurki
Katja Joronen
Tiina Luukkaala
Eija Paavilainen
Author Affiliation
Sari Lepistö MNSc RN PhD Student Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Finland. sari.j.lepisto@uta.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Jun;66(6):1232-45
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study of experiences of domestic violence and coping among ninth-grade (14-17 years old) adolescents.
Domestic violence is commonplace and adolescents are involved in it either as witnesses or victims. Research has shown that different degrees of domestic violence play a major role in adolescent well-being and coping.
A survey of ninth graders in one municipality in Finland was conducted in 2007. A total of 1393 adolescents participated, giving a 78% response rate. The survey included two validated scales, the Violence Scale and the Adolescent Coping Scale. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine coping among adolescents with and without experience of domestic violence.
Sixty-seven per cent of adolescents had experienced parental symbolic aggression, 55% mild violence and 9% serious violence. The multivariate logistic regression model showed that experiences of violence were associated with deterioration in self-rated health, life satisfaction, adolescent giving in when in a conflict situation, approval of corporal punishment and coping by seeking to belong and self-blame. Those with experience of domestic violence did not seek professional help.
Adolescents experiencing domestic violence do not seek help and care providers should therefore take active measures to help them. These adolescents reported that they were satisfied with life, which makes it difficult to identify their need for help. Resources should be developed to identify and help these adolescents.
PubMed ID
20546357 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences and suicidal behavior of adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122157
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;22(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Reetta Isohookana
Kaisa Riala
Helinä Hakko
Pirkko Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland. reettais@paju.oulu.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;22(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Inpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Parents - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study examines the association of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to suicidal behavior and mortality in 508 Finnish adolescents (aged 12-17 years) who required acute psychiatric hospitalization between April 2001 and March 2006. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) and the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI) were used to obtain information about ACEs, adolescents' suicidal behavior and psychiatric diagnoses. The cases of death were obtained from Statistics Finland. The results of our study indicated that, among girls, exposure to sexual abuse statistically significantly increased the risk of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) (OR, 1.8; 95 % CI, 1.0-3.2) and suicide attempts (OR, 2.3; 95 % CI, 1.0-4.5). The cumulative number of ACEs was also associated with an increased risk of NSSI (OR, 1.2; 95 % CI, 1.0- 1.4) and suicide attempts (OR, 1.2; 95 % CI, 1.0-1.4) in girls. Among all deceased adolescents, ACEs were most notable among those who had died due to accidents and injuries. Gender differences in the types of ACEs were noted and discussed.
PubMed ID
22842795 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences in relation to mood and anxiety disorders in a population-based sample of active military personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124248
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
J. Sareen
C A Henriksen
S L Bolton
T O Afifi
M B Stein
G J G Asmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. sareen@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although it has been posited that exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increases vulnerability to deployment stress, previous literature in this area has demonstrated conflicting results. Using a cross-sectional population-based sample of active military personnel, the present study examined the relationship between ACEs, deployment related stressors and mood and anxiety disorders.
Data were analyzed from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey-Canadian Forces Supplement (CCHS-CFS; n = 8340, age 18-54 years, response rate 81%). The following ACEs were self-reported retrospectively: childhood physical abuse, childhood sexual abuse, economic deprivation, exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce/separation, parental substance abuse problems, hospitalization as a child, and apprehension by a child protection service. DSM-IV mood and anxiety disorders [major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic attacks/disorder and social phobia] were assessed using the composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI).
Even after adjusting for the effects of deployment-related traumatic exposures (DRTEs), exposure to ACEs was significantly associated with past-year mood or anxiety disorder among men [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.34, 99% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.73, p
PubMed ID
22608015 View in PubMed
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"A fool to keep staying": battered women labeling themselves stupid as an expression of gendered shame.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98680
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Jan;16(1):5-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Viveka Enander
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. aqut@hotmail.com
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Jan;16(1):5-31
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - psychology
Domestic Violence - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Intelligence
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Self Concept
Shame
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In this qualitative study with women who have left abusive heterosexual relationships, the informants labeling themselves stupid is investigated. Several different meanings ascribed to stupidity were found, with feeling stupid for allowing oneself to be mistreated and for staying in the abusive relationship as main themes. Four frames for interpreting the findings are presented: abusive relationship dynamics, gendered shame, the gender-equality-oriented Nordic context, and leaving processes. It is proposed that feeling- and labeling oneself-stupid is an expression of gendered shame or, more explicitly, of battered shame.
PubMed ID
19949227 View in PubMed
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Alaskan well-being: 2008 Legislative Health Caucus forums report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101959
Source
State of Alaska Legislative Health Caucus
Publication Type
Report
Date
2008
Source
State of Alaska Legislative Health Caucus
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Alaska
Distance health
Domestic Violence
Mental health
Public safety
Rural Alaska
Socioeconomic health
Substance abuse
Telehealth
Telemedicine
Uninsured Alaskans
Abstract
The Alaska Joint Legislative Health Caucus was formed during the 2004 Legislative Session to provide a summary of critical statewide information on current health issues.
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242 records – page 1 of 25.