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1069 records – page 1 of 107.

25 years of implanted intracardiac pacers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55503
Source
Lancet. 1988 Mar 19;1(8586):636-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-1988
Author
H. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1988 Mar 19;1(8586):636-8
Date
Mar-19-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Arrhythmia - physiopathology - therapy
Cardiac Pacing, Artificial - history - methods
Dogs
Electrodes, Implanted
Heart Block - physiopathology - therapy
Heart rate
History, 20th Century
Humans
Pacemaker, Artificial - history
Sweden
Abstract
In 1962, a simplified method of transvenously inserting an intracardiac electrode and implanting the whole pacemaker system under local anaesthesia was reported from the Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm. This simplified method has been universally adopted and pacemakers are now probably implanted too freely in many places. In the Stockholm area pacemakers are implanted half as frequently as in the rest of Sweden and as often as in the United Kingdom.
PubMed ID
2894560 View in PubMed
Less detail

'1001' Campylobacters: cultural characteristics of intestinal campylobacters from man and animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245183
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1980 Dec;85(3):427-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980
Author
M B Skirrow
J. Benjamin
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1980 Dec;85(3):427-42
Date
Dec-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - cytology - drug effects - isolation & purification
Cattle - microbiology
Culture Media
Dogs - microbiology
Humans
Intestines - microbiology
Metronidazole - pharmacology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Swine - microbiology
Temperature
Abstract
The cultural characteristics of 1220 Campylobacter strains from a variety of sources are described. Forty-two were identified as Campylobacter fetus ssp. fetus (Véron & Chatelain, 1973), 1120 as members of the C. jejuni/C. coli group, and 58 did not conform to any known description. Sixteen of the latter strains had the basic characteristics of C. fetus but were atypical in certain other respects. The other 42 strains had the thermophilic characteristics of the jejuni/coli group, but were resistant to nalidixic acid and had other features in common; it is possible that they represent a new species. They were isolated from 19% of locally caught wild seagulls but only occasionally from other animals and man.Growth at 25 degrees C clearly distinguished strains of C. fetus from those of the jejuni/coli and the nalidixic acid-resistant thermophilic (NARTC) groups. Maximum growth temperature was less reliable for this purpose, and 43 degrees C was found to be better than the traditional 42 degrees C. By arranging the results of three tests (tolerance to 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride, growth at 30.5 and 45.5 degrees C) serially in the form of a schema comprising nine categories, the jejuni/coli strains fell into two main groups resembling the Institute Pasteur C. jejuni and C. coli type strains, but these groups could not be clearly defined owing to the existence of strains with intermediate characteristics.Most of the strains from cattle resembled C. jejuni, whereas those from pigs resembled C. coli; poultry strains occupied a more intermediate position. Strains from man and other animals were of mixed types, but most human strains resembled C. jejuni rather than C. coli. The type distribution pattern that most nearly matched that of human indigenous strains was given by a half-and-half mixture of strains from cattle and poultry.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1973 Mar;82(3):493-54572934
Cites: Br Med J. 1977 Jul 2;2(6078):9-11871765
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1977 Sep;23(9):1311-371191
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1978 Jul;8(1):36-41670386
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1978 Oct;14(4):553-6718153
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1979 Jan;25(1):1-7427650
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1979 Jan;25(1):8-16218715
Cites: Vet Rec. 1979 Oct 6;105(14):333117609
Cites: Br Med J. 1980 May 31;280(6227):1301-27388519
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1953 Jul;66(1):24-613069461
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1957 Sep-Oct;101(2):119-2813475869
PubMed ID
7462593 View in PubMed
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The 1925 Diphtheria Antitoxin Run to Nome - Alaska: A Public Health Illustration of Human-Animal Collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310761
Source
J Med Humanit. 2019 Sep; 40(3):287-296
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Basil H Aboul-Enein
William C Puddy
Jacquelyn E Bowser
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Health & Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, UK. Basil.Aboul-Enein@lshtm.ac.uk.
Source
J Med Humanit. 2019 Sep; 40(3):287-296
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Diphtheria Antitoxin - history
Dogs
Health Services Accessibility
History, 20th Century
Humans
Public Health
Abstract
Diphtheria is an acute toxin-mediated superficial infection of the respiratory tract or skin caused by the aerobic gram-positive bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The epidemiology of infection and clinical manifestations of the disease vary in different parts of the world. Historical accounts of diphtheria epidemics have been described in many parts of the world since antiquity. Developed in the late 19th century, the diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) played a pivotal role in the history of public health and vaccinology prior to the advent of the diphtheria-tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine. One of the most significant demonstrations of the importance of DAT was its use in the 1925 diphtheria epidemic of Nome, Alaska. Coordinated emergency delivery of this life-saving antitoxin by dog-sled relay in the harshest of conditions has left a profound legacy in the annals of vaccinology and public health. Lead dogs Balto and Togo, and the dog-led antitoxin run of 1925 represent a dynamic illustration of the contribution made by non-human species towards mass immunization in the history of vaccinology. This unique example of cooperative interspecies fellowship and collaboration highlights the importance of the human-animal bond in the one-health initiative.
PubMed ID
28032302 View in PubMed
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[A 100 year old thesis. Amanuensis Hans Christian Geelmuyden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48136
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Dec 10;117(30):4410-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1997
Author
J. Bremer
Author Affiliation
Institutt for medisinsk biokjemi Universitetet i Oslo, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Dec 10;117(30):4410-2
Date
Dec-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetone - metabolism
Animals
Diabetes Mellitus - history
Dissertations, Academic - history
Dogs
English Abstract
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Norway
Physiology - history
Rabbits
Abstract
Hans Christian Geelmuyden (1861-1945) was amanuensis (assistant professor) at the Institute of Physiology, University of Oslo from 1889 to 1931. In 1897 he was awarded the degree "Doctor of Medicine" for his thesis "Om aceton som stofvexelprodukt" (On acetone as a metabolic product). The Nobel laureate Feodor Lynen referred to this thesis, which was also published in German, stating that Geelmuyden was the first to establish that ketone bodies are formed from fatty acids. Geelmuyden also established that acetone is metabolized in rabbits and dogs. Geelmuyden was a prolific writer on fat metabolism and diabetes and wrote a series of extensive reviews on these topics in Ergebnisse der Physiologie. Geelmuyden was active in the treatment of diabetic patients.
PubMed ID
9456588 View in PubMed
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Accelerated recovery of ischemic canine myocardium induced by AMP. Preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55698
Source
Adv Myocardiol. 1985;6:483-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
H M Sami
J R Koke
N. Bittar
Source
Adv Myocardiol. 1985;6:483-90
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Diphosphate - metabolism
Adenosine Monophosphate - metabolism - pharmacology
Adenosine Triphosphate - metabolism
Animals
Coronary Disease - drug therapy
Creatine - metabolism
Dogs
Energy Metabolism - drug effects
Female
Male
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Phosphocreatine - metabolism
Abstract
Experiments were conducted on 18 dogs using an in situ blood-perfused canine heart model. Intracoronary infusion of AMP resulted in increased ATP and total adenine nucleotide levels. On reperfusion following a 15-min period of ischemia, ATP and total adenine nucleotide levels were significantly higher than control. Most important, contractile function recovered more rapidly in the AMP-treated dogs. It is therefore concluded that the delayed functional recovery noted after periods of ischemia is likely to be a direct result of delayed ATP resynthesis.
PubMed ID
3992046 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the role of domestic cats and dogs in the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251120
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1976 May;(5):64-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1976
Author
E A Shevkunova
V D Mel'nikov
V P Dzhanpoladova
L I Gracheva
T V Tsarueva
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1976 May;(5):64-8
Date
May-1976
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Dog Diseases - transmission
Dogs
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - transmission
Russia
Toxoplasmosis - transmission
Toxoplasmosis, Animal - transmission
Abstract
A total of 2643 persons in 5 different regions were examined for toxoplasmosis by the immunofluorescence test and toxoplasmin skin test. The presence in the house of cats and dogs was taken into account. In two of the five regions under study there was revealed an increased incidence of toxoplasmosis in persons keeping cats; this confirmed the role of these animals as a source of toxoplasmosis infection. The absence of such increase in the incidence of the disease in other regions in explained by the character of buildings admitting migration of cats or the presence in the given region of other active sources of infection. Toxoplasmosis incidence in persons who kept or didn't keep dogs displayed no significant difference.
PubMed ID
133582 View in PubMed
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Active and social life is associated with lower non-social fearfulness in pet dogs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305072
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 08 13; 10(1):13774
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-13-2020
Author
Emma Hakanen
Salla Mikkola
Milla Salonen
Jenni Puurunen
Sini Sulkama
César Araujo
Hannes Lohi
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 08 13; 10(1):13774
Date
08-13-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Anxiety - psychology
Behavior, Animal
Dog Diseases - psychology
Dogs
Fear - psychology
Female
Finland
Human-Animal Bond
Humans
Male
Noise - adverse effects
Pets - psychology
Socialization
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Behavioural problems are leading welfare issues in domestic dogs. In particular, anxiety-related behavioural problems, such as fearfulness and noise sensitivity are highly prevalent conditions that cause distress to fearful dogs. To better understand the environmental factors associated with non-social fear, including noise sensitivity, fear of novel situations, and fear of surfaces and heights, a large online survey including data on 13,700 Finnish pet dogs was performed by the dog owners. After fulfilling inclusion criteria, this data consisted of 9,613 dogs with fear of fireworks, 9,513 dogs with fear of thunder, 6,945 dogs with fear of novel situations, and 2,932 dogs with fear of surfaces and heights. Logistic regression analyses revealed that dogs with frequent non-social fear had experienced less socialisation during puppyhood, were more often neutered, had inexperienced owners, lived without conspecifics, participated less frequently in activities or training, and lived in more urban environments. In addition, we identified several breed differences, and a tendency of more common non-social fear in small dog breeds, which suggests a genetic background. Non-social fearfulness has a negative effect on well-being of the dogs. Our findings suggest that the socialisation and the living environment and the value of other dogs' company and owner interaction via activities and training may improve the well-being of the dogs.
PubMed ID
32792641 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activity of enzymes of tricarboxylic and pentose-phosphate cycles in dog brain with myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56070
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1977 May-Jun;49(3):51-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M M Zanozdra
Iu V Khmelevs'kii
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1977 May-Jun;49(3):51-4
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain - enzymology
Cerebellum - enzymology
Cerebral Cortex - enzymology
Citric Acid Cycle
Coronary Vessels
Dogs
English Abstract
Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Hypoxia, Brain - enzymology
Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex - metabolism
Medulla Oblongata - enzymology
Mitochondria - enzymology
Myocardial Infarction - enzymology
Pentosephosphates - metabolism
Succinate Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Transaldolase - metabolism
Abstract
Under conditions of experimental myocardium infarction caused in dogs by ligation of the anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery, the activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase in mitochondria of the cortex, cerebellum and medulla ablongata lowers most intensively on the first and fifth day after the appearance of acute myocardium infarction. Activation of the most important enzymes of the pentose-phosphate cycle (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and transketolase) which is clearly pronounced on the fifth day is observed in the mentioned sections. In the authors' opinions the above changes in the activity of the enzymes are due to the brain hypoxia which may be the main reason of disturbance in the function of the central nervous system under this disease.
PubMed ID
888227 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acute dose-dependent effects of ethanol on canine myocardial perfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11527
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):351-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
R V Kettunen
J. Timisjärvi
J. Heikkilä
P. Saukko
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):351-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Flow Velocity
Coronary Circulation - drug effects
Dogs
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Microspheres
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
The acute effects of ethanol (1.0 g/kg and 1.5 g/kg, n = 4 and n = 5, yielding blood concentrations of 1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/ml and 2.4 +/- 0.3 mg/ml) on myocardial perfusion were studied in anesthetized, thoracotomized, artificially ventilated dogs by using a radioactive microsphere technique. The control group (n = 5) received saline. The smaller dose of ethanol decreased perfusion in the left ventricular myocardium from 0.737 +/- 0.122 to 0.555 +/- 0.122 ml/g/min (NS), whereas the greater dose nonsignificantly increased it, from 0.744 +/- 0.115 to 0.819 +/- 0.119 ml/g/min (p
PubMed ID
7818790 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acute dose-related effects of ethanol on right ventricular function in anesthetized dogs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11893
Source
Alcohol. 1992 Mar-Apr;9(2):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Kettunen
J. Timisjärvi
P. Saukko
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Alcohol. 1992 Mar-Apr;9(2):149-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cardiac Output - drug effects
Dogs
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Heart Rate - drug effects
Pulmonary Artery - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Right - drug effects
Abstract
The acute dose-related effects of small to moderate doses of ethanol on right ventricular functioning were studied on 18 anesthetized, artificially ventilated dogs in 39 sessions. Diluted ethanol (from 25-37.5%) was infused during 40 minutes, yielding total doses of 1.0 g/kg (n = 15), and 1.5 g/kg (n = 12) with corresponding venous blood ethanol peak concentrations of 1.38 +/- 0.25 and 2.41 +/- 0.31 mg/ml, respectively. Heart rate increased up to 16% in groups receiving ethanol. In the control group receiving the equivalent volume of saline (n = 12) heart rate decreased 14%. Pulmonary arterial systolic pressure increased from 24 +/- 3 to 27 +/- 3 mmHg and diastolic pressure from 11 +/- 2 to 14 +/- 4 mmHg (p less than 0.05) when the ethanol dose was 1.0 g/kg. The pulmonary arterial resistance increased from 620 +/- 135 to 805 +/- 185 dyn.s.cm-5 (p less than 0.01). The peak dP/dt decreased maximally by 20% with increasing ethanol doses. Stroke volume decreased maximally by 14% but due to the increase in heart rate, cardiac output even increased. The changes in end-diastolic volume and pressure were not significant. Hence, the ethanol increased heart rate and afterload of the right ventricle but depressed the myocardium.
PubMed ID
1599626 View in PubMed
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1069 records – page 1 of 107.