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[ANIMAL TOXOCARIASIS IN A MEGALOPOLIS: EPIDEMIC ASPECTS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270410
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Jul-Sep;(3):39-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
O A Panova
I G Glamazdin
S E Spiridonov
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Jul-Sep;(3):39-41
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Cats
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Dogs
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow - epidemiology
Toxocariasis - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of toxocariasis was studied among a population of domestic and stray dogs and cats. In a megalopolis, Toxocara invasion was 31.6% in a population of cats and 82 and 25.4% in that of puppies and dogs, respectively. A method was developed for the molecular genetic identification of T. cati and T. canis.
PubMed ID
26720970 View in PubMed
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An investigation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in people and pets in the same household with an infected person or infected pet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148824
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2009 Sep 1;235(5):540-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2009
Author
Meredith C Faires
Kathy C Tater
J Scott Weese
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2009 Sep 1;235(5):540-3
Date
Sep-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Canada - epidemiology
Carrier state
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Cross Infection
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Dogs
Family Characteristics
Humans
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
United States - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence of concurrent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in people and pets in the same household with a person or pet with an MRSA infection and to compare MRSA isolates by use of molecular techniques.
2 cross-sectional evaluations conducted concurrently.
24 dogs, 10 cats, and 56 humans in part 1 and 21 dogs, 4 cats, and 16 humans in part 2 of the study.
In both parts of the study, nasal swab specimens were collected from humans and nasal and rectal swab specimens were collected from household pets. Selective culture for MRSA was performed, and isolates were typed via pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing. Households were defined as positive when MRSA was isolated from at least 1 person (part 1) or 1 pet (part 2).
In part 1, 6 of 22 (27.3%) households were identified with MRSA colonization in a person. In these households, 10 of 56 (17.9%) humans, 2 of 24 (8.3%) dogs, and 1 of 10 (10%) cats were colonized with MRSA. In part 2, only 1 of 8 households was identified with MRSA colonization in a pet. Most MRSA isolates obtained from humans and pets in the same household were indistinguishable by use of PFGE.
The high prevalence of concurrent MRSA colonization as well as identification of indistinguishable strains in humans and pet dogs and cats in the same household suggested that interspecies transmission of MRSA is possible. Longitudinal studies are required to identify factors associated with interspecies transmission.
PubMed ID
19719444 View in PubMed
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Aortic stenosis in the Dogue de Bordeaux.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92609
Source
J Small Anim Pract. 2008 Sep;49(9):432-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Höllmer M.
Willesen J L
Jensen A T
Koch J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
J Small Anim Pract. 2008 Sep;49(9):432-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Aortic Valve Stenosis - epidemiology - ultrasonography - veterinary
Breeding
Denmark - epidemiology
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Dogs
Echocardiography - standards - veterinary
Female
Heart Auscultation - veterinary
Heart Murmurs - complications - epidemiology - veterinary
Male
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence of aortic stenosis and establish echocardiographic reference values in the Dogue de Bordeaux in Denmark. METHODS: Fifty-three dogs were auscultated for evidence of a cardiac murmur and a full echocardiographic examination was performed. The criterion for the diagnosis of aortic stenosis was a peak aortic velocity greater than 2.5 m/s from a subcostal transducer location. RESULTS: A left-basilar ejection murmur was detected in 38 (72 per cent) of the dogs. An aortic ejection velocity greater than 2.5 m/s was identified in 9 (17 per cent) of the dogs from a subcostal view. The aortic annulus in Dogue de Bordeaux was smaller than that considered normal in other breeds with comparable body size. Furthermore, a decreased aortoseptal angle was noticed in dogs with aortic stenosis. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The Dogue de Bordeaux may be highly predisposed to aortic stenosis. The small aortic annulus noted in healthy and affected Dogue de Bordeaux and a decreased aortoseptal angle noted in affected dogs in this study might reflect key aetiological features in the development of aortic stenosis.
PubMed ID
18684150 View in PubMed
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Babesia spp. and other pathogens in ticks recovered from domestic dogs in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269558
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:262
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Christen Rune Stensvold
Dua Al Marai
Lee O'Brien Andersen
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Jørgen Skov Jensen
Kim Søholt Larsen
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:262
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - microbiology - parasitology
Babesia - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Babesiosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Borrelia - genetics - isolation & purification
Denmark
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Dogs
Female
Ixodes - parasitology
Male
Rickettsia - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Newly recognized endemic foci for human babesiosis include Europe, where Ixodes ricinus, a vector for several species of Babesia, is the most commonly identified tick. Vector-based surveillance provides an early warning system for the emergence of human babesiosis, which is likely to be under-reported at emerging sites. In the present study, we set out to screen I. ricinus collected from Danish domestic dogs for Babesia, in order to identify whether humans in Denmark are exposed to the parasite.
A total of 661 ticks (Ixodes spp.) were collected from 345 Danish domestic dogs during April-September 2011 and pooled, one sample per dog. DNA was extracted from each sample and examined by PCR and sequencing for Rickettsia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Bartonella spp., Francisella tularensis, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, and Babesia spp. In total, 34% of the samples were positive for tick-borne microorganisms potentially pathogenic to humans: Rickettsia spp. were detected in 16% of the pools, with 79% being R. helvetica. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was found in 15%, with the main species identified as Borrelia afzelii (39%). Likewise, 8% of the samples were positive for Babesia spp. (Babesia microti, 82%; Babesia venatorum ('EU1'), 18%). Lastly, 1% of the samples tested positive for Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, and 0.6% for Bartonella spp. No ticks were found to be infected with Francisella tularensis.
Our data are in support of endemic occurrence of potentially zoonotic Babesia in Denmark and confirms I. ricinus as a vector of multiple pathogens of public health concern.
Notes
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Cites: Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2014;4:10325120960
PubMed ID
25951937 View in PubMed
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Bladder cancer in pet dogs: a sentinel for environmental cancer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244284
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1981 Aug;114(2):229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981
Author
H M Hayes
R. Hoover
R E Tarone
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1981 Aug;114(2):229-33
Date
Aug-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Canada
Dog Diseases - epidemiology
Dogs
Female
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
United States
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - veterinary
Abstract
Proportional morbidity ratios (PMRs) were calculated for cancers, by site or type, in 8760 pet dogs seen at 13 veterinary medical teaching hospitals in the United States and Canada. A significant positive correlation was seen between the PMRs for canine bladder cancer and the overall level of industrial activity in the host county of the hospital. An analysis of mortality from bladder cancer among white men and women in the same US counties showed similar correlations with industrial activity. Canine bladder cancer could be a sentinel condition whose investigation in locales might lead to early identification of carcinogenic hazards in the general environment.
PubMed ID
7304557 View in PubMed
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Blastomycosis: report of three cases from Alberta with a review of Canadian cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246920
Source
Mycopathologia. 1979 Aug 31;68(1):53-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-31-1979
Author
A S Sekhon
M S Bogorus
H V Sims
Source
Mycopathologia. 1979 Aug 31;68(1):53-63
Date
Aug-31-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Antigens, Fungal - analysis
Blastomycosis - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Canada
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Cats
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Dogs
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Humans
Lung - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Staining and Labeling - methods
Abstract
Approximately 120 cases of blastomycosis have been reported from Canada to-date. The great majority of these occurred in the Eastern provinces. Since 1970, three cases of blastomycosis have been seen in Alberta. The first case, with meningeal and pulmonary involvements, was diagnosed at post-mortem. The second case was that of a 75-year-old male with a history of pancytopenia, aortic arteriosclerosis, exposure to mercury, and fever. KOH and periodic-acid schiff (PAS) stained smears of the lung tissue, received after autopsy, showed numerous budding yeast cells of Blastomyces dermatitidis along with some hyphal filaments. Similarly, budding cells of B. dermatitidis and hyphal segments were observed in large numbers in the PAS and Gomori's methenamine-silver (GMS) stained sections made from adrenals, lung, kidney, and spleen tissues. Attempts to culture the fungus on a variety of selective and non-selective media were unsuccessful, due to heavy bacterial contamination. The indirect fluoroscent antibody results were 2+ with the B. dermatitidis conjugate. The third case was that of a 31-year-old male, who was admitted to the hospital with the chief complaint of chest pain. Biopsy tissue sections, stained with the GMS procedure revealed a few foci with B. dermatitidis yeast cells. The immunodiffusion and complement fixation (CF) tests gave positive results against B. dermatitidis antigen (titre, 1:16). The CF titre declined following treatment with amphotericin B and the immunodiffusion test became negative after the institution of antifungal therapy. Except for the last patient, the other two patients had no history of travel in any known endemic areas. In addition to these cases, a survey of blastomycosis occurring in this country has been presented along with on the disease in dogs and a cat.
PubMed ID
91108 View in PubMed
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Bone tumors in a population of 400 000 insured Swedish dogs up to 10 y of age: incidence and survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84544
Source
Can J Vet Res. 2007 Oct;71(4):292-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Egenvall Agneta
Nødtvedt Ane
von Euler Henrik
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. Agneta.Egenvall@kv.slu.se
Source
Can J Vet Res. 2007 Oct;71(4):292-9
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Bone Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - veterinary
Breeding
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Dogs
Female
Incidence
Insurance - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to describe the incidence of, survival until, and survival after the diagnosis of canine bone tumors by breed, sex, age, and geographic location of residence. Dogs under 10 y old and insured by a Swedish insurance company between 1995 and 2002 were studied. In total, 764 dogs had claims for bone tumors, and the incidence rate was 5.5 cases per 10 000 dog-years at risk (DYAR). At ages 6, 8, and 10 y, the proportions of dogs with bone tumors were 0.13%, 0.30%, and 0.64%. The top 3 breeds at risk were Irish wolfhound, St. Bernard, and leonberger (incidence rates 99, 78, and 53 cases per 10 000 DYAR, respectively). Median survival time after diagnosis was 56 d in the 419 dogs that survived > or = 1 d. With a Cox regression model controlling for breed and age, females were shown to be at decreased risk of bone tumors, with a hazard ratio of 0.71 (99% confidence interval 0.58 to 0.87).
PubMed ID
17955904 View in PubMed
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Brucellosis outbreak in a Swedish kennel in 2013: determination of genetic markers for source tracing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272646
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Dec 5;174(3-4):523-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-2014
Author
Rene Kaden
Joakim Ågren
Viveca Båverud
Gunilla Hallgren
Sevinc Ferrari
Joann Börjesson
Martina Lindberg
Stina Bäckman
Tara Wahab
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Dec 5;174(3-4):523-30
Date
Dec-5-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Brucella canis - genetics - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Dogs
Female
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genome, Bacterial - genetics
Humans
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Sequence Analysis, DNA - veterinary
Species Specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Brucellosis is a highly infectious zoonotic disease but rare in Sweden. Nonetheless, an outbreak of canine brucellosis caused by an infected dog imported to Sweden was verified in 2013. In total 25 dogs were tested at least duplicated by the following approaches: real-time PCR for the detection of Brucella canis, a Brucella genus-specific real-time PCR, selective cultivation, and microscopic examination. The whole genome of B. canis strain SVA13 was analysed regarding genetic markers for epidemiological examination. The genome of an intact prophage of Roseobacter was detected in B. canis strain SVA13 with whole genome sequence prophage analysis (WGS-PA). It was shown that the prophage gene content in the American, African and European isolates differs remarkably from the Asian strains. The prophage sequences in Brucella may therefore serve of use as genetic markers in epidemiological investigations. Phage DNA fragments were also detected in clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in the genome of strain SVA13. In addition to the recommendations for genetic markers in Brucella outbreak tracing, our paper reports a validated two-step stand-alone real-time PCR for the detection of B. canis and its first successful use in an outbreak investigation.
PubMed ID
25465667 View in PubMed
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Canine neoplasia--introductory paper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93806
Source
APMIS Suppl. 2008;(125):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Gamlem Hans
Nordstoga Knut
Glattre Eystein
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway. hans.gamlem@vetinst.no
Source
APMIS Suppl. 2008;(125):5-18
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dog Diseases - epidemiology
Dogs
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - veterinary
Norway - epidemiology
Vascular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper gives a brief introduction to canine oncology, including its comparative aspects as basis for recording tumours in the animal kingdom. In an abbreviated presentation of the Norwegian Canine Cancer Project for the years 1990-1998, the data (n=14,401) were divided into age groups, each of two years, into different categories of tumours, and into age and gender. As expected, cutaneous histiocytoma was the dominant tumour type in both sexes during the two first years of life. In the age group 2-3.99 years histiocytoma was still the largest group in males, but was surpassed by benign epithelial skin tumours in females. After the age of 4 years, benign epithelial skin tumours constituted the greatest circumscribed group in males, and mammary tumours in females, although the summated other tumours, not explained in this survey, dominated overall in males. Maligancies (cancer) were shown in the same way, by corresponding groups of gender and age. While mastocytoma was the most common tumour and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma the second most common during the two first years of life in females, the situation was reversed in males. Later, mammary tumours dominated in females, while different tumour types not further specified in this summarized report dominated in males, until the end of the age registration (above 14 years). Number, sex and location of most common tumours are shown in a tabular outline. Comparative aspects between human and dog tumours are considered: mammary and testicular neoplasia seemed more frequent in dogs than in humans in Norway, while intestinal, pulmonary and prostatic malignancies were less common in dogs. In our study, vascular tumours and tumour-like lesions constituted about 3% of the total data. As benign vascular tumours are incompletely reported to the human Cancer Registry, no dependable comparison may be made, but malignant vascular tumours have been on the rise during the last decades in the Norwegian human population, more so in men then in women. Finally, the article deals briefly with the development of endothelial cells, and the sparse information on causal factors of vascular tumours.
PubMed ID
19385278 View in PubMed
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138 records – page 1 of 14.