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9 records – page 1 of 1.

[Detection of Babesia canis (Piroplasmida) DNA in the blood samples and lysates of the ticks Dermacentor reticulatus (Ixodidae) collected in the Tula and Moscow Regions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257568
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2014 Jan-Mar;(1):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
I Iu Shchit
A V Shtannikov
E E Sergeeva
T V Reshetniak
T V Repolovskaia
V M Shaitanov
V P Gutova
I S Vasil'eva
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2014 Jan-Mar;(1):25-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - parasitology
Babesia - isolation & purification
Babesiosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
DNA - blood - classification - genetics
DNA Primers - chemistry
Dermacentor - parasitology
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Dogs
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Tick Infestations - diagnosis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Abstract
Chimeric primers, the sensitivity and specificity of which allow them to be used in both the clinical setting and the epizootological assessment of tick infection by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, have been designed against Babesia canis infection. The findings suggest that a large number of Babesia DNA copies are detectable in the blood in acute babesiosis. Some animals that had experienced babesiosis developed blood B. canis carriage--a small number oftrophozoites remained alive for a long time. When babesiosis was suspected, its diagnosis could be confirmed by RT-PCR in half of dogs with subclinical signs. The tick concentration of Babesia ranged from several hundred to a few thousand parasites. There were no significant differences in the number of Babesia parasites in the infected ticks in relation to their collection site. However, the occurrence of infected ticks was significantly higher in the places of constant contact with a canine population, which is indicative of the decisive role of dogs in the intensity of an epizootic process in the foci of B. canis infection.
PubMed ID
24738223 View in PubMed
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First report of spinose ear tick, Otobius megnini (Acari, Argasidae), in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289472
Source
Exp Appl Acarol. 2017 Jun; 72(2):179-181
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Anders Lindström
Johanna Lindström
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Ulls väg 2B, 751 89, Uppsala, Sweden. anders.lindstrom@sva.se.
Source
Exp Appl Acarol. 2017 Jun; 72(2):179-181
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Argasidae - growth & development
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dogs
Ear - parasitology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A dog that had travelled to Sweden was inspected by a veterinarian. In one ear canal a tick was found. It was later identified as a spinose ear tick, Otobius megnini. In this case report we also review the previously known reports of O. megnini in Europe and the recent introduction and spread in Turkey.
Notes
Cites: Exp Appl Acarol. 2012 May;57(1):91-104 PMID 22371208
Cites: Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2014 Mar;5(2):213-8 PMID 24355764
Cites: Turkiye Parazitol Derg. 2016 Sep;40(3):152-157 PMID 27905285
Cites: J Med Entomol. 1994 Mar;31(2):240-56 PMID 8189415
PubMed ID
28573423 View in PubMed
Less detail

First report of spinose ear tick, Otobius megnini (Acari, Argasidae), in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289630
Source
Exp Appl Acarol. 2017 Jun; 72(2):179-181
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Anders Lindström
Johanna Lindström
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Ulls väg 2B, 751 89, Uppsala, Sweden. anders.lindstrom@sva.se.
Source
Exp Appl Acarol. 2017 Jun; 72(2):179-181
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Argasidae - growth & development
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dogs
Ear - parasitology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A dog that had travelled to Sweden was inspected by a veterinarian. In one ear canal a tick was found. It was later identified as a spinose ear tick, Otobius megnini. In this case report we also review the previously known reports of O. megnini in Europe and the recent introduction and spread in Turkey.
Notes
Cites: Exp Appl Acarol. 2012 May;57(1):91-104 PMID 22371208
Cites: Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2014 Mar;5(2):213-8 PMID 24355764
Cites: Turkiye Parazitol Derg. 2016 Sep;40(3):152-157 PMID 27905285
Cites: J Med Entomol. 1994 Mar;31(2):240-56 PMID 8189415
PubMed ID
28573423 View in PubMed
Less detail

Leptospirosis in the family dog: a public health perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158859
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Feb 12;178(4):399-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-2008
Author
Ken Brown
John Prescott
Author Affiliation
Infectious Disease Control Division, York Region Community and Health Services, Newmarket, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Feb 12;178(4):399-401
Date
Feb-12-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dogs - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Leptospira - immunology - isolation & purification
Leptospirosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Public Health
Notes
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD00130610796767
Cites: Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2003 Jul;33(4):791-80712910744
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Mar;12(3):501-316704794
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Feb 23;310(8):497-5006363930
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2003 Dec;3(12):757-7114652202
PubMed ID
18268265 View in PubMed
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Questions stated prevalence of leptospirosis in dogs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190129
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2002 May 15;220(10):1452; author reply 1452-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2002

Rabies in a puppy imported from India to the USA, March 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91785
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2008 Oct;55(8-10):427-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Castrodale L.
Walker V.
Baldwin J.
Hofmann J.
Hanlon C.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Anchorage, AK 99503, USA. louisa.castrodale@alaska.gov
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2008 Oct;55(8-10):427-30
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Bites and Stings
Commerce
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission
Dogs
Fatal Outcome
Humans
India - ethnology
Public Health
Rabies - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Rabies Vaccines - administration & dosage
Transportation
Travel
United States - epidemiology
Vaccination - veterinary
Zoonoses
Abstract
In March 2007, a puppy that was recently imported from India into the United States was found to be positive for rabies by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. This case report highlights several important public health issues. First, recognizing that humans and animals are part of a global community with frequent travel and translocation, the risks of disease introduction, particularly with sub-clinical or incubating animals, are real and present. Animal-importation regulations, policies and practices are intended to minimize these risks and should be routinely evaluated and updated as needed in response to occurrences such as detailed in this communication. Second, veterinarians play key roles in safeguarding the public's health with regard to monitoring the movement of animals and diagnosing zoonoses. Third, investigating rabies cases that involve multiple jurisdictions are labour-intensive and require significant resources to ensure that all potentially exposed persons are identified and receive the appropriate rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
18833596 View in PubMed
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Serological investigation of canine encephalitozoonosis in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7341
Source
Parasitol Res. 2003 Jan;89(1):49-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Johan Akerstedt
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 8156 Dep., 0033 Oslo, Norway. johan.akerstedt@vetinst.no
Source
Parasitol Res. 2003 Jan;89(1):49-52
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Protozoan - blood
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Dogs
Encephalitozoon cuniculi - immunology
Encephalitozoonosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serologic Tests
Abstract
Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a microsporidian parasite of vertebrates, is considered a health risk to AIDS patients and other immunocompromised human beings. In most hosts, infection with the parasite runs a subclinical course. In some carnivore species, however, clinical disease affecting whole litters arises from intrauterine transmission of the parasite. In both blue foxes ( Alopex lagpus) and dogs ( Canis familiaris), outbreaks of encephalitozoonosis can be severe. Canine encephalitooonosis has been reported from various parts of the world, including South Africa and the United States. In Norway, there have been large outbreaks of the disease in blue fox farms, affecting also mink, but there have been no reports of encephalitozoonosis in dogs. Infection in dogs would represent a zoonotic problem, due to the close social relationship between dog and man. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible occurrence of E. cuniculi infection in Norwegian dogs by serological methods. In the study, 1,104 canine serum samples, originally submitted for biochemical analysis by veterinary practitioners throughout Norway, were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to E. cuniculi. Samples from 237 of the dogs were tested also by the indirect fluorescent antibody test. All samples were concluded as negative. The results indicate that the likelihood of occurrence of E. cuniculi infection in Norwegian dogs is small.
PubMed ID
12474043 View in PubMed
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Survival and prognostic factors in 189 dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54499
Source
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 1997 Jul-Aug;33(4):364-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Tidholm
H. Svensson
C. Sylvén
Author Affiliation
Albano Animal Hospital of Stockholm (Tidholm), Danderyd, Sweden.
Source
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 1997 Jul-Aug;33(4):364-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Ascites - diagnosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - diagnosis - mortality - veterinary
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Dogs
Dyspnea - diagnosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - etiology - mortality - veterinary
Incidence
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A survival analysis was performed using the case records of 189 dogs, including 38 breeds, with congestive heart failure caused by dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Overall prognosis was poor, with survival rates of 17.5% at one year and 7.5% at two years. Prognosis in the individual case of DCM proved to be difficult to predict at the time of initial examination. Only three of 27 tested independent predictors of survival were identified. The most significant predictive variables were age at onset of clinical signs, followed by dyspnea and ascites (as noted on the physical examination).
PubMed ID
9204475 View in PubMed
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Validation of the diagnosis canine epilepsy in a Swedish animal insurance database against practice records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258910
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2014 Jun 1;114(3-4):145-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2014
Author
Linda Heske
Mette Berendt
Karin Hultin Jäderlund
Agneta Egenvall
Ane Nødtvedt
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2014 Jun 1;114(3-4):145-50
Date
Jun-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dogs
Epilepsy - veterinary
Insurance, Health
Medical Records
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Veterinary Medicine
Abstract
Canine epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions in dogs but the actual incidence of the disease remains unknown. A Swedish animal insurance database has previously been shown useful for the study of disease occurrence in companion animals. The dogs insured by this company represent a unique population for epidemiological studies, because they are representative of the general dog population in Sweden and are followed throughout their life allowing studies of disease incidence to be performed. The database covers 50% of all insured dogs (in the year 2012) which represents 40% of the national dog population. Most commonly, dogs are covered by both veterinary care insurance and life insurance. Previous studies have shown that the general data quality is good, but the validity of a specific diagnosis should be examined carefully before using the database for incidence calculations. The aim of the current study was therefore to validate the information contained in the insurance database regarding canine epilepsy. The validation focused on the positive predictive value and the data-transfer from the veterinary practice records to the insurance database. The positive predictive value was defined as the proportion of recorded cases that actually had the disease in question. The quality of the data-transfer was assessed by comparing the diagnostic codes in practice records to the codes in the insurance database. The positive predictive value of the diagnostic codes for canine epilepsy (combining "epileptic convulsions" and "idiopathic epilepsy") in the insurance database was validated in a cross-sectional study where insurance claims for canine epilepsy were compared to diagnostic information in practice records. A random sample of dogs with a reimbursed insurance claim during 2006 was included in the study sample (n=235). Practice records were requested by mail from attending veterinarians. Two independent examiners scrutinized all the records. All 235 dogs were coded correctly in the database as they really had suffered seizures with or without convulsions, and the quality of the data-transfer was therefore excellent. In total, 167 dogs (71%) were classified as cases of canine epilepsy according to pre-defined criteria, and the positive predictive value was therefore considered relatively high. Based on these results, it was concluded that the data regarding canine epilepsy in the insurance database can be used for further population studies.
PubMed ID
24680294 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.