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119 records – page 1 of 12.

A 26-week, prospective, open-label, uncontrolled, multicenter study to evaluate the effect of an escalating-dose regimen of trandolapril on change in blood pressure in treatment-naive and concurrently treated adult hypertensive subjects (TRAIL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163832
Source
Clin Ther. 2007 Feb;29(2):305-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Richard H Tytus
Ellen D Burgess
Linda Assouline
Anita Vanjaka
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Ther. 2007 Feb;29(2):305-15
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Indoles - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
This study evaluated the effectiveness of an escalating-dose regimen of trandolapril in subjects with stage 1 or stage 2 hypertension.
This was a 26-week, prospective, open-label,multicenter study in Canadian primary care centers. Subjects with hypertension who were treatment naive or whose disease was uncontrolled on current first-line antihypertensive monotherapy were treated with trandolapril for 26 weeks alone or in addition to their current treatment. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) >or=140/90 mm Hg in subjects with no other risk factors or >or=130/80 mm Hg in subjects with diabetes or kidney disease. Trandolapril therapy was initiated at 1 mg/d and was titrated as required to 2 or 4 mg at 4 and 9 weeks after initiation of treatment, respectively, in those not achieving BP targets. At 14 weeks after treatment initiation, subjects not achieving BP targets could receive a combination of trandolapril 4 mg plus a calcium channel blocker (verapamil 240 mg) with or without a diuretic. Primary outcome was the percentage of patients reaching target BP after 14 weeks.
A total of 1683 subjects from 192 general practice clinics across Canada completed the 14-week trandolapril dose-optimization phase, and 1650 completed the full 26-week follow-up. Mean (SD) age was 56.6 (12.6) years, and 49.2% of the subjects were men. At baseline, 82.4% (1359/1650) of subjects were antihypertensive-treatment naive. At the trial end, 73.4% (95% CI, 70.9-75.9) of subjects achieved a target level of SBP/DBP
PubMed ID
17472822 View in PubMed
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Abnormal diurnal rhythm of urine output following renal transplantation: the impact of blood pressure and diuretics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139130
Source
Transplant Proc. 2010 Nov;42(9):3529-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
K. Alstrup
C. Graugaard-Jensen
S. Rittig
K A Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. karenalstrup@dadlnet.dk
Source
Transplant Proc. 2010 Nov;42(9):3529-36
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Circadian Rhythm
Denmark
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drinking
Female
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Osmolar Concentration
Polyuria - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Urination - drug effects
Urodynamics - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Nocturnal polyuria is the excretion at night of an excessive volume of urine. A major problem following renal transplantation is an abnormal diurnal rhythmicity in urine output. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria among renal transplant recipients in the early period after transplantation as well as at least 1 year after transplantation. We aimed to explore possible pathophysiological mechanisms behind nocturnal polyuria in this group of patients, focusing on the impact of blood pressure and medication.
Seventeen recently transplanted patients 17 late transplant recipients, and 17 healthy controls were included in the study. Voiding habits were assessed by completion of a frequency-volume chart recording all fluid intakes and voiding. A concomitant 24-hour blood pressure profile was obtained in all.
Renal transplant recipients had a high prevalence of nocturnal polyuria (74%) and a disturbed blood pressure profile with a lack of appropriate nocturnal dipping (P
Notes
Comment In: J Urol. 2012 Mar;187(3):96422325519
PubMed ID
21094810 View in PubMed
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Acute acetylsalicylic acid poisoning: treatment with forced alkaline diuresis and diuretics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249506
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1977 Oct 14;12(2):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-1977
Author
K J Berg
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1977 Oct 14;12(2):111-6
Date
Oct-14-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid-Base Equilibrium
Adolescent
Adult
Aspirin - poisoning
Barbiturates - poisoning
Blood Gas Analysis
Bumetanide - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Clinical Trials as Topic
Diuresis
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Female
Furosemide - therapeutic use
Gastric Lavage
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Male
Potassium - blood
Salicylates - blood
Abstract
101 patients were treated for acute acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) poisoning in the Nephrological Unit Trondheim between 1971-1975. On admission 33 of them had a serum salicylic acid (SA) concentration greater than 400 microgram/ml (mean 588 +/- 40 microgram/ml). This group was compared with a group of 11 children less than 5 years old with ASA poisoning and a mean serum SA on admission of 550 +/- 34 microgram/ml. Blood pH on admission was normal or elevated in all patients more than 12 years old (mean 7.43 +/- 0.01), whereas 7 of the 11 children suffered from metabolic acidosis. The results of forced alkaline diuresis produced by loop diuretics (bumetanide, furosemide) in ASA poisoned patients older than 12 years are reported. The mean T 1/2 of SA was 9.6 h in the treated group as compared to 18-22 h in untreated patients. There was no apparent difference between the diuretic effect of bumetanide and furosemide.
PubMed ID
21797 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:6B-8B
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Serge Lepage
Author Affiliation
Cardiology Division, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec. serge.lepage@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:6B-8B
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - therapeutic use
Patient Readmission - economics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Acute decompensated heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years of age. Although treatment of this condition has improved over the past two decades, the specific approach to patients in the acute setting has not evolved in the same way. A patient facing acute decompensation is experiencing a serious medical condition that is associated with a poor prognosis. In addition, acute decompensated heart failure results in significant costs to the health care system. Significant morbidity and mortality are associated with patients who are readmitted within a year of the first hospitalization. Because of this important problem, further research on improving the prognosis for this condition is warranted. The present article will focus on the risk factors associated with acute decompensation and the importance of this condition, both on prognosis and economics.
Notes
Cites: Rev Cardiovasc Med. 2003;4 Suppl 7:S21-3014668697
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 May 1;20(6):599-60715152289
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Nov 28;165(21):2486-9216314545
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Dec;21(14):1301-616341301
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jul 20;355(3):260-916855266
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 31;19(4):436-812704492
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Jun 19;115(24):3103-1017548729
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2001 Oct 22;161(19):2337-4211606149
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Mar;24(5):442-6312633546
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2003 Mar;88(1):33-4112659982
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 31;19(4):430-512704491
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-4517245481
PubMed ID
18629381 View in PubMed
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Acute heart failure: lessons learned so far.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134305
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):284-95
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jonathan G Howlett
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiac Sciences, University of Calgary, and Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. jonathan.howlett@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):284-95
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Early Diagnosis
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Vasodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Abstract
Acute heart failure (AHF) affects nearly every Canadian with heart failure (HF) at least once. Despite several attempts, no medical therapies have been shown to improve the natural history of AHF. In addition, the place of diagnosis of AHF is increasingly made in the outpatient setting. In this view, AHF is a moving target, and from recent registry data and from clinical trials, 5 critical lessons regarding the syndrome of AHF emerge: (1) The period of clinical instability preceding AHF may be much longer than previously thought. (2) Refinement of tools used to aid the early and accurate diagnosis of AHF will impact patient outcomes. (3) Standard supportive care of patients with AHF includes early use of diuretics with frequent reassessment in nearly all patients and supplemental vasodilators and oxygen therapy in selected cases. (4) Patients who survive presentation of AHF continue to suffer high rates of re-presentation, death, and rehospitalization following discharge from either hospital or emergency department. (5) Interventions shown to improve patient outcomes for AHF to date are related to process of care rather than new medications or devices. This report reviews the recent literature regarding the presentation, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of AHF. Areas of future research priority are indicated and guidelines for improving treatment are provided. AHF is an important clinical area that has not been as intensively studied as chronic HF; it presents both important needs and exciting opportunities for research and innovation.
PubMed ID
21601768 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects on risk of ischaemic heart disease of adding sugar to hot beverages in hypertensives using diuretics. A six year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11267
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Righospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Coffee
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea
Abstract
Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and essential hypertension (EH) are two of several manifestations of the insulin resistance syndrome. Although subjects with NIDDM and subjects with EH share a common defect in carbohydrate metabolism, only diabetics are advised to avoid sugar. We tested the theory that an adverse effect of diuretics treatment in men with EH with respect to risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) would depend on the intake of dietary sugar using sugar in hot beverages as a marker. The cohort consisted of 2,899 men from the Copenhagen Male Study aged 53-74 years (mean 63) who were without overt cardiovascular disease. Potential confounders were: age, alcohol,smoking, physical activity, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipids, cotinine, NIDDM,and social class. A total of 340 men took antihypertensives; 211 took diuretics (95% thiazides and related agents), and 129 used other antihypertensives. During 6 years, 179 men (6.2%) had a first IHD event. Among the 340 men taking antihypertensives, the incidence rate was 11%. Diuretics use was associated with a high risk of IHD in hypertensive men with a relatively high intake of dietary sugar; the cumulative incidence rate was 22%; in diuretics treated men with a low intake of sugar, the rate was 7%. After controlling for potential confounders, relative risk (95% ci.) was 3.1(1.3-7.6), p = 001. Among the 129 men who took other forms of antihypertensive drugs, the IHD incidence rate was 8%, and independent of the intake of sugar. The results indicate that the risk of IHD in hypertensives using diuretics is associated with intake of dietary sugar, which may explain at least some of the discouraging effects of antihypertensive agents on the reduction of risk of IHD.
PubMed ID
8860097 View in PubMed
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Age- and gender-related differences in the use of secondary medical prevention after primary vascular surgery: a nationwide follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127996
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012 Mar;43(3):300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
A. Høgh
J S Lindholt
H. Nielsen
L P Jensen
S P Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, Regionshospitalet Viborg, Denmark. a_l_hogh@yahoo.dk
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012 Mar;43(3):300-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - surgery
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Peripheral Arterial Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Secondary Prevention - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Vascular Surgical Procedures - utilization
Abstract
This study examined the possible age- and gender-related differences in the use of secondary medical prevention following primary vascular reconstruction in a population-based long-term follow-up study.
Using information from nationwide Danish registers, we identified all patients undergoing primary vascular reconstruction in-between 1996 and 2006 (n = 20,761). Data were obtained on all filled prescriptions 6 months and 3, 5 and 10 years after primary vascular reconstruction. Comparisons were made across age and gender groups, using men 40-60 years old as a reference.
Compared to current guidelines the overall use of secondary medical prevention was moderate to low (e.g., lipid-lowering drugs 49.5%, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ACE/ATII) 43.4%, combination of lipid-lowering drugs and anti-platelet therapy and any anti-hypertensive therapy 44.7%). A decline was observed between 6 months and 3 years after surgery. Patients >80 years old were less likely to be prescribed lipid-lowering drugs and combination therapy (e.g.: adjusted risk ratio (RR) 5 years after surgery for men and women 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.39-1.02) and 0.48 (95%CI: 0.31-0.75), respectively, whereas smaller and statistical non-significant gender-related differences were observed. The age- and gender-related differences appeared eliminated or substantially reduced in the latest part of the study period (2001-2007).
We found moderate to low use of secondary medical prevention in Denmark compared with recommendations from clinical guidelines. However, the use has increased in recent years and age- and gender-related differences have been reduced or even eliminated.
PubMed ID
22244910 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias in relation to mild hypokalaemia and prognosis in community dwelling middle-aged and elderly subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281049
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Nick Mattsson
Golnaz Sadjadieh
Preman Kumarathurai
Olav Wendelboe Nielsen
Lars Køber
Ahmad Sajadieh
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Atrial Premature Complexes - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Biomarkers - blood
Denmark
Disease-Free Survival
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Hypokalemia - blood - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Time Factors
Ventricular Premature Complexes - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Abstract
Severe hypokalaemia can aggravate arrhythmia tendency and prognosis, but less is known about risk of mild hypokalaemia, which is a frequent finding. We examined the associations between mild hypokalaemia and ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias and their prognosis.
Subjects from the cohort of the 'Copenhagen Holter Study' (n = 671), with no history of manifest cardiovascular (CV) disease or stroke, were studied. All had laboratory tests and 48-h ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The median follow-up was 6.3 years. p-Potassium was inversely associated with frequency of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) especially in combination with diuretic treatment (r = -0.22, P = 0.015). Hypokalaemia was not associated with supraventricular arrhythmias. Subjects at lowest quintile of p-potassium (mean 3.42, range 2.7-3.6 mmol/L) were defined as hypokalaemic. Cardiovascular mortality was higher in the hypokalaemic group (hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals: 2.62 (1.11-6.18) after relevant adjustments). Hypokalaemia in combination with excessive PVC worsened the prognosis synergistically; event rates: 83 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with both abnormalities, 10 and 15 per 1000 patient-year in those with one abnormality, and 3 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with no abnormality. One variable combining hypokalaemia with excessive supraventricular arrhythmias gave similar results in univariate analysis, but not after multivariate adjustments.
In middle-aged and elderly subjects with no manifest heart disease, mild hypokalaemia is associated with increased rate of ventricular but not supraventricular arrhythmias. Hypokalaemia interacts synergistically with increased ventricular ectopy to increase the risk of adverse events.
PubMed ID
26293625 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive drug prescribing and persistence among new elderly users: implications for persistence improvement interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104230
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 Jun;30(6):647-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Karen Tu
Laura N Anderson
Debra A Butt
Hude Quan
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Norm R Campbell
Finlay A McAlister
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; University Health Network-Toronto Western Hospital Family Health Team, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: karen.tu@ices.on.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 Jun;30(6):647-52
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Aged
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Income
Logistic Models
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Sodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Stroke - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine persistence rates and factors influencing persistence for new elderly users of antihypertensive drugs.
We conducted a population-based cohort study in Ontario of adults aged 66 years or older to identify new users of antihypertensive medications between 1999 and 2010. Two-year therapy and class persistence were defined as persistence on any antihypertensive medication and persistence only on the same antihypertensive medication class, respectively.
From 1999-2010, the prevalence of antihypertensive drug use increased from 47.8%-60.5% (P
PubMed ID
24882536 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive drug treatment in a middle-aged population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242968
Source
Hypertension. 1982 Sep-Oct;4(5):716-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Enlund
A. Nissinen
J. Tuomilehto
Source
Hypertension. 1982 Sep-Oct;4(5):716-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy - utilization
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physical Examination
Questionnaires
Risk
Abstract
In Finland's North Karelia region a community-based program for control of hypertension was administered for 5 years. Afterward, drug treatment and the impact of such treatment on control of blood pressure were studied in a cross-sectional survey. The study population (n = 10,199) consisted of a 6.6% random sample of people aged 30-64 years in North Karelia (program area) and Kuopio (reference area). Rate of participation was about 90%. The methods included questionnaire, personal interview, and clinical examination. In North Karelia, 24% of the men and 25% of the women were hypertensives (blood pressure greater than or equal to 175 mm Hg systolic and/or 100 mm Hg diastolic, or currently on antihypertensive drug therapy), compared with 33% of the men and 29% of the women in the reference area. In North Karelia, 48% of the male hypertensives and 67% of the female hypertensives were on drug therapy, compared with 32% and 54%, respectively, in the reference area. Of the total population in each area, 14% in North Karelia currently used drugs, compared with 13% in the reference area. Diuretics and beta-blockers were the drugs most commonly prescribed; men used beta-blockers more often than women did. In terms of quantity of medication, type of drugs, and compliance, the differences between the two areas were small. Control of blood pressure, however, was clearly better in North Karelia than in the reference area for hypertensives and drug users and for both men and women. Therefore, compared with the traditional system, organized hypertension care results in more successful treatment.
PubMed ID
6125473 View in PubMed
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119 records – page 1 of 12.