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Sleepiness and sleep in patients with both systolic heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167431
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2006 Sep 18;166(16):1716-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-18-2006
Author
Michael Arzt
Terry Young
Laurel Finn
James B Skatrud
Clodagh M Ryan
Gary E Newton
Susanna Mak
John D Parker
John S Floras
T Douglas Bradley
Author Affiliation
Sleep Research Laboratory of the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Center for Sleep Medicine and Circadian Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2006 Sep 18;166(16):1716-22
Date
Sep-18-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Polysomnography
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - epidemiology
Systole - physiology
Time Factors
Wisconsin - epidemiology
Abstract
Adverse effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), including sleep deprivation, can contribute to the progression of heart failure. The usual indication to diagnose and treat sleep apnea is subjective sleepiness. Previous studies suggest that patients with both heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea often do not complain of sleepiness, albeit their sleep time may be reduced. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that patients with heart failure have less sleepiness and sleep less compared with subjects without heart failure for a given severity of OSA.
Sleepiness assessed with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and sleep structure measured with polysomnography were compared among 155 consecutive patients with heart failure and from a random community sample (n = 1139) according to categories of the apnea-hypopnea index ( or =15, moderate to severe OSA).
Compared with the community sample, for any given severity of OSA, patients with heart failure had lower mean +/- SE Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores (7.1 +/- 0.4 vs 8.3 +/- 0.2 [P = .005]; 6.7 +/- 0.7 vs 9.2 +/- 0.3 [P
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 2007 May 28;167(10):1098-9; author reply 1099-10017533214
PubMed ID
16983049 View in PubMed
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