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Adherence to hand hygiene and risk factors for poor adherence in 13 Ontario acute care hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133791
Source
Am J Infect Control. 2011 Oct;39(8):693-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Dominik Mertz
Jennie Johnstone
Paul Krueger
Kevin Brazil
Stephen D Walter
Mark Loeb
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Infect Control. 2011 Oct;39(8):693-6
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohols - administration & dosage
Female
Guideline Adherence
Hand Disinfection - methods - standards
Health Personnel - psychology
Hospitals
Humans
Hygiene
Male
Observation - methods
Ontario
Risk factors
Abstract
Multicenter studies assessing hand hygiene adherence and risk factors for poor performance are scarce. In an observational study involving 13 hospitals across Ontario, Canada, we found a mean adherence rate of 31.2%, and that adherence was positively associated with nurses, single rooms, contact precautions, and the availability of alcohol hand rub dispensers.
PubMed ID
21664722 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to surgical hand rubbing directives in a hospital district of Southwest Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275226
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2016 Feb;48(2):116-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Erkki Laurikainen
Esa Rintala
Anne-Mari Kaarto
Marianne Routamaa
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2016 Feb;48(2):116-21
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disinfectants - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence
Hand Disinfection - methods
Health Personnel
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Surgical Procedures, Operative - methods
Abstract
The primary objective was to measure the compliance with alcohol-based surgical hand rubbing (SHR) among operation room personnel. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effect of feedback sessions on compliance.
This was a prospective observational before-after intervention study. Between October 2010 and June 2012 the hygiene nurses observed SHR among operation room personnel in the hospital district of Southwest Finland. After feedback sessions a second observation round was conducted in the main operation room of Turku University Hospital. The first observation round comprised 477 observations: 259 (54%) were doctors, 190 (40%) nurses and 28 (5%) other personnel. In the second observation round a total of 210 observations were made.
During the first round in 42% of observations the 3 min SHR time recommended by WHO was used. Median times for SHR were 1 min 50 s (range 0 min to 5 min 44 s) for doctors and 3 min 25 s (range 1 min 1 s to 8 min 15 s) for nurses, respectively (p?
PubMed ID
26416015 View in PubMed
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[Advice on hygiene for health personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225676
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Sep 20;111(22):2754
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1991
Author
M. Stormark
A B Kjelsberg
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for forebyggende infeksjonsmedisin, Avdeling for Samfunnsmedisin Statens Institutt for Folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Sep 20;111(22):2754
Date
Sep-20-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disinfection - methods
Hand - microbiology
Hand Disinfection - methods
Health Personnel
Humans
Hygiene
Norway
PubMed ID
1948868 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol-based hand-disinfection reduced children's absence from Swedish day care centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91548
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2008 Dec;97(12):1672-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Lennell Anne
Kühlmann-Berenzon Sharon
Geli Patricia
Hedin Katarina
Petersson Christer
Cars Otto
Mannerquist Kerstin
Burman Lars G
Fredlund Hans
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unit for Infectious Disease Control, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. anne.lennell@orebroll.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2008 Dec;97(12):1672-80
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Alcohols - therapeutic use
Child
Child Day Care Centers - methods
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Disinfection - methods
Female
Gels - therapeutic use
Handwashing - methods
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: To determine if the use of alcohol-based hand-disinfection as a complement to regular hand washing at daycare centers (DCCs) can reduce the childhood rate of absenteeism. METHODS: Children aged 0-6 years attending DCC were studied in a cluster randomized controlled trial during 30 weeks. Thirty matched pairs of DCCs were included in the study, where one of the DCCs was randomized to intervention and the other to control within each pair. The intervention consisted in children and staff using alcohol-based oily disinfectant gel containing 70% ethanol after regular hand washing. The main outcome was the rate of episodes of absence from DCC due to infection. A regression model was fitted at the individual level and controlling several possible confounders for illness. Absences were reported by the parents. RESULTS: Differences in missing absence reports between the two groups led to only evaluating those 29 DCCs (1431 children) that were able to provide complete reports. In the multivariate regression, the intervention significantly reduced the rate of absenteeism of a child by 12% compared to a child in a control DCC (IRR 95% CI: 0.799-0.965). CONCLUSION: Hand-disinfection used by children and staff significantly decreased childrens absences due to infections in Swedish DCCs.
PubMed ID
18945282 View in PubMed
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Ammonia sanitization of blackwater for safe use as fertilizer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268278
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(5):795-800
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jörgen Fidjeland
Sven-Erik Svensson
Björn Vinnerås
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(5):795-800
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ammonia - chemistry
Animals
Ascaris
Calcium Compounds - chemistry
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus
Enterococcus faecalis
Escherichia coli
Escherichia coli O157
Fertilizers
Oxides - chemistry
Salmonella
Salmonella typhimurium
Sweden
Temperature
Urea - chemistry
Waste Water - chemistry - microbiology - parasitology
Abstract
Source-separated blackwater from low-flush toilets contains plant-available nutrients and can be used as a fertilizer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact on pathogen inactivation when treating blackwater with urea and/or lime. Blackwater was spiked with Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157, Enterococcus faecalis, and Ascaris suum eggs, and treated with urea and/or lime in concentrations up to 0.1% w/w. The bottles were kept in a storage facility (manure slurry tank) for 102 days while monitoring the pathogen concentrations. The treatment time needed to meet the requirement for Salmonella and E. coli reduction could be reduced at least six-fold. The enterococci were more persistent, and only the highest treatment doses had a significantly higher inactivation than the controls. The Ascaris egg viability was only reduced by around 50%, so higher urea/lime doses and/or longer treatment times are required to fulfill the treatment requirements of 3 log10 reductions of parasite eggs.
PubMed ID
25768229 View in PubMed
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Amount of alcohol-based hand rub used and incidence of hospital-acquired bloodstream infection in a danish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148712
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2009 Oct;30(10):1012-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Sussie Laustsen
Brian Kristensen
Ane Marie Thulstrup
Jens Kjølseth Møller
Bo Martin Bibby
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. sussie.laustsen@ki.au.dk
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2009 Oct;30(10):1012-4
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohols - administration & dosage - supply & distribution
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - administration & dosage - supply & distribution
Bacteremia - epidemiology
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Hand Disinfection - methods
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Incidence
Abstract
We investigated the association between the amount of alcohol-based hand rub (hereafter, "hand rub") used and the incidence of healthcare-acquired bloodstream infection (HCR-BSI) from 2004 through early 2008. The amount of hand rub used increased significantly, and the incidence of HCR-BSI remained stable. There was no significant association between the amount of hand rub used and the incidence of HCR-BSI.
PubMed ID
19732009 View in PubMed
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An alternative methodology for interpretation and reporting of hand hygiene compliance data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131026
Source
Am J Infect Control. 2012 May;40(4):332-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Giulio DiDiodato
Author Affiliation
North Simcoe Muskoka Infection Control Network, Orillia, Ontario, Canada. gdidiodato@gmail.com
Source
Am J Infect Control. 2012 May;40(4):332-5
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hand Disinfection - methods - standards
Hospitals
Humans
Ontario
Research Design - standards
Abstract
Since 2009, all hospitals in Ontario have been mandated to publicly report health care provider compliance with hand hygiene opportunities (http://www.health.gov.on.ca/patient_safety/index.html). Hand hygiene compliance (HHC) is reported for 2 of the 4 moments during the health care provider-patient encounter. This study analyzes the HHC data by using an alternative methodology for interpretation and reporting.
Annualized HHC data were available for fiscal years 2009 and 2010 for each of the 5 hospital corporations (6 sites) in the North Simcoe Muskoka Local Health Integration Network. The weighted average for HHC was used to estimate the overall observed rate for HHC for each hospital and reporting period. Using Bayes' probability theorem, this estimate was used to predict the probability that any patient would experience HHC for at least 75% of hand hygiene moments. This probability was categorized as excellent (=75%), above average (50%-74%), below average (25%-49%), or poor (
PubMed ID
21945114 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outbreak of scabies in a long-term care facility: the role of misdiagnosis and the costs associated with control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169457
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2006 May;27(5):517-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Gretha de Beer
Mark A Miller
Lucie Tremblay
Johanne Monette
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. grethadb@lantic.net
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2006 May;27(5):517-8
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Diagnostic Errors
Disease Outbreaks
Disinfection - methods
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Infection Control - economics
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
Long-Term Care
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Scabies - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
In August 2003, an outbreak of scabies was detected in a Canadian long-term care facility. The outbreak was likely associated with 2 index cases, 1 involving classic scabies and the other involving Norwegian scabies. The scabies control costs totaled CDN $200,000, and the facility received negative publicity for a short period after the outbreak.
PubMed ID
16671037 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outbreak of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a hematology-oncology unit: control by patient cohorting and terminal cleaning of the environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188914
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;23(8):468-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Mary Lu Sample
Denise Gravel
Cathy Oxley
Baldwin Toye
Gary Garber
Karam Ramotar
Author Affiliation
Infection Control, The Ottawa Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;23(8):468-70
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Male
Oncology Service, Hospital
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Isolation
Vancomycin Resistance
Abstract
We describe the impact of enhanced infection control interventions on controlling the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in our hematology-oncology unit. Between April and September 1998, 13 patients on this unit were identified as having VRE. In addition to contact precautions, other measures that were needed to control the outbreak included closure of the unit to new admissions, creation of a cohort of VRE-positive patients and staff, and thorough cleaning of patients' rooms with 0.5% sodium hypochlorite.
PubMed ID
12186215 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing most practical and effective protocols to sanitize hands of poultry catching crew members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114386
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2013 Aug 1;111(1-2):92-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2013
Author
M. Racicot
A. Kocher
G. Beauchamp
A. Letellier
J-P Vaillancourt
Author Affiliation
Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 59 Camelot, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0Y9. manon.racicot@inspection.gc.ca
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2013 Aug 1;111(1-2):92-9
Date
Aug-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohols - therapeutic use
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Gels - therapeutic use
Hand Disinfection - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poultry
Quebec
Questionnaires
Skin Cream - therapeutic use
Soaps - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
Catching crew members can heavily contaminate their hands with organic material. They can act as mechanical vector and spread diseases between farms. Hand hygiene is an important issue for the industry as a whole and for human health by reducing contamination risks. Many studies, in human medicine, tend to make hand rub a standard for hand hygiene. However, few studies have tested the effectiveness of hand hygiene products on visibly contaminated hands. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of practical hand sanitization protocols: water and soap, degreasing cream and hand wipes, all combined with alcohol-based hand gel. The use of alcohol-based gel alone was also evaluated. For the reduction of coliforms after washing, there was no statistically significant difference between protocols when the initial level of bacterial contamination was low to moderate. When hands were highly contaminated, the alcohol-based gel alone was less effective than the degreasing cream combined with the alcohol-based gel (p=0.002). As for the reduction in total aerobic bacteria counts, there was no difference between protocols when the initial level of bacterial contamination was low. The water, soap and alcohol-based gel protocol was more effective than the scrubbing wipes and alcohol-based gel protocol when hands were moderately (p=0.002) and highly contaminated (p=0.001). All protocols were effective in neutralizing Salmonella on hands. Reducing the level of bacterial contamination on hands before using an alcohol-based gel seems important to ensure effective hand sanitation for highly and moderately contaminated hands. This can be done by using a degreasing cream or water and soap. Based on the survey, catching crew members preferred using warm water and soap compared to a degreasing cream.
PubMed ID
23618466 View in PubMed
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95 records – page 1 of 10.