Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

14 records – page 1 of 2.

[Assessment of the use of chlorine-containing solid disinfectants in case of avian influenza pandemic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149421
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 May-Jun;(3):47-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
O A Mel'nikova
A Iu Petrov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 May-Jun;(3):47-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds
Chlorine Compounds - pharmacology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Disinfection - utilization
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype - drug effects
Influenza in Birds - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper gives an economic assessment of the present market of monochlorine-containing disinfectants. It analyzes the consumption of disinfectants in g per m2 for disinfection measures in case of avian influenza epidemic.
PubMed ID
19642554 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Biodegradation of surface-active substances of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus K-4]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97475
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2010 Jan-Feb;72(1):28-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
T P Pyroh
S I Antoniuk
A I Sorokina
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2010 Jan-Feb;72(1):28-33
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acinetobacter calcoaceticus - drug effects - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Biodegradation, Environmental
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Formaldehyde - pharmacology
Soil Microbiology
Surface Tension
Surface-Active Agents - analysis - metabolism
Time Factors
Abstract
A capacity of microorganisms of different taxonomic groups to assimilate surface-active substances (surfactants) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus K-4 as a single source of carbon and energy has been established. It was shown that A. calcoaceticus K-4 cannot use its own surfactants as a source of carbon nutrition. The use of biocide formalin in concentration of 0.1% permits to prolong the term of preservation of A. calcoaceticus K-4 surfactants to 3.5 months without a loss of their surfactant and emulsiying properties.
PubMed ID
20364713 View in PubMed
Less detail

Efficacy of a commercial produce wash on bacterial contamination of lettuce in a food service setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182422
Source
J Food Prot. 2003 Dec;66(12):2359-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Sarah Smith
Mila Dunbar
Diana Tucker
Donald W Schaffner
Author Affiliation
Food Risk Analysis Initiative, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, 65 Dudley Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901-8520, USA.
Source
J Food Prot. 2003 Dec;66(12):2359-61
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - drug effects - growth & development
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Disinfection - methods
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Food Services - standards
Humans
Lettuce - microbiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Many microorganisms (including a number of important foodborne pathogens) can be present on raw fruits and vegetables. Since these products are frequently eaten raw, any pathogens present represent a potential risk to the consumer. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of a commercial produce wash with that of water for reducing the total bacterial population on lettuce when used by food service employees in university dining halls. Because this study was carried out in actual food service facilities during their daily operation, we used indigenous produce microflora instead of actual pathogens. Over the course of the study, more than 40 heads of lettuce were divided into thirds, and each section was analyzed for total plate count either before washing, after washing in water, or after washing in Victory produce wash. When initial contamination levels were > or = 100 CFU/g (n = 36 samples), reductions obtained with Victory produce wash (1.8 log CFU/g) were significantly larger (P = 0.0006) than those obtained with water (0.8 log CFU/g). Our results indicate that Victory produce wash is effective in reducing indigenous flora on lettuce during food service preparation. Our results also show that care must be taken in the analysis of microbial reduction data: only a slight reduction in total plate count (ca. 0.1 log CFU/g) and no significant difference in reductions (P = 0.84) were observed when all samples (irrespective of initial contamination level) were compared.
PubMed ID
14672238 View in PubMed
Less detail

Efficacy of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) for reducing microbial contamination on minimally-processed vegetables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159055
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Mar 31;123(1-2):151-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2008
Author
Maribel Abadias
Josep Usall
Márcia Oliveira
Isabel Alegre
Inmaculada Viñas
Author Affiliation
IRTA, Centre UdL-IRTA, XaRTA-Postharvest, 191 Rovira Roure, 25198-Lleida, Catalonia, Spain. isabel.abadias@irta.cat
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Mar 31;123(1-2):151-8
Date
Mar-31-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Escherichia coli O157 - drug effects - growth & development
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Lettuce - microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects - growth & development
Pectobacterium carotovorum - drug effects - growth & development
Salmonella - drug effects - growth & development
Temperature
Time Factors
Vegetables - microbiology
Abstract
Consumption of minimally-processed, or fresh-cut, fruit and vegetables has rapidly increased in recent years, but there have also been several reported outbreaks associated with the consumption of these products. Sodium hypochlorite is currently the most widespread disinfectant used by fresh-cut industries. Neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) is a novel disinfection system that could represent an alternative to sodium hypochlorite. The aim of the study was to determine whether NEW could replace sodium hypochlorite in the fresh-cut produce industry. The effects of NEW, applied in different concentrations, at different treatment temperatures and for different times, in the reduction of the foodborne pathogens Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and against the spoilage bacterium Erwinia carotovora were tested in lettuce. Lettuce was artificially inoculated by dipping it in a suspension of the studied pathogens at 10(8), 10(7) or 10(5) cfu ml(-1), depending on the assay. The NEW treatment was always compared with washing with deionized water and with a standard hypochlorite treatment. The effect of inoculum size was also studied. Finally, the effect of NEW on the indigenous microbiota of different packaged fresh-cut products was also determined. The bactericidal activity of diluted NEW (containing approximately 50 ppm of free chlorine, pH 8.60) against E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, L. innocua and E. carotovora on lettuce was similar to that of chlorinated water (120 ppm of free chlorine) with reductions of 1-2 log units. There were generally no significant differences when treating lettuce with NEW for 1 and 3 min. Neither inoculation dose (10(7) or 10(5) cfu ml(-1)) influenced the bacterial reduction achieved. Treating fresh-cut lettuce, carrot, endive, corn salad and 'Four seasons' salad with NEW 1:5 (containing about 50 ppm of free chlorine) was equally effective as applying chlorinated water at 120 ppm. Microbial reduction depended on the vegetable tested: NEW and sodium hypochlorite treatments were more effective on carrot and endive than on iceberg lettuce, 'Four seasons' salad and corn salad. The reductions of indigenous microbiota were smaller than those obtained with the artificially inoculated bacteria tested (0.5-1.2 log reduction). NEW seems to be a promising disinfection method as it would allow to reduce the amount of free chlorine used for the disinfection of fresh-cut produce by the food industry, as the same microbial reduction as sodium hypochlorite is obtained. This would constitute a safer, 'in situ', and easier to handle way of ensuring food safety.
PubMed ID
18237810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of chemical disinfectants for aleutian disease virus of mink.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12990
Source
Am J Vet Res. 1981 May;42(5):838-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
D T Shen
L W Leendertsen
J R Gorham
Source
Am J Vet Res. 1981 May;42(5):838-40
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - drug effects
Chlorhexidine - pharmacology
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Ethanol - pharmacology
Formaldehyde - pharmacology
Glutaral - pharmacology
Iodophors - pharmacology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium Hydroxide - pharmacology
Sodium Hypochlorite - pharmacology
Viruses, Unclassified - drug effects
Water - pharmacology
Abstract
Nine chemicals and commercial disinfectants were tested for inactivation of Aleutian disease virus of mink. In the presence of distilled water, a commercial disinfectant (O-Syl), halogen derivatives (iodophor and sodium hypochlorite), and glutaraldehyde (2.0%) inactivated 4 log10 (based on 0.25 ml) of the virus within 10 minutes at 23 C. Formalin (2.0%) and O-Syl were slower to inactivate the virus, but achieved a 4 log10 reduction in titer by 30 minutes' contact time. In the presence of 10% bovine serum, formalin (1.0%), O-Syl, and sodium hydroxide (0.5%) achieved a 4 log10 reduction within 10 minutes. All agents tested had some virucidal effect.
PubMed ID
6266294 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequency of disinfectant resistance genes and genetic linkage with beta-lactamase transposon Tn552 among clinical staphylococci.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18937
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2002 Sep;46(9):2797-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Maan Singh Sidhu
Even Heir
Truls Leegaard
Karianne Wiger
Askild Holck
Author Affiliation
MATFORSK, Norwegian Food Research Institute, N-1430 As, Norway.
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2002 Sep;46(9):2797-803
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture Media
DNA Transposable Elements - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - biosynthesis - genetics
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Linkage (Genetics) - genetics
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Plasmids - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Staphylococcal Infections - microbiology
Staphylococcus - drug effects - genetics
Abstract
A total of 61 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 177 coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains were isolated from the blood of patients with bloodstream infections and from the skin of both children under cancer treatment and human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. The MIC analyses revealed that 118 isolates (50%) were resistant to quaternary ammonium compound-based disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BC). The frequencies of resistance to a range of antibiotics were significantly higher among BC-resistant staphylococci than among BC-sensitive staphylococci. Of 78 BC-resistant staphylococcal isolates, plasmid DNA from 65 (83%), 2 (3%), 43 (55%), and 15 (19%) isolates hybridized to qacA or -B (qacA/B), qacC, blaZ, and tetK probes, respectively. The qacA/B and blaZ probes hybridized to the same plasmid in 19 (24%) staphylococcal strains. The plasmids harboring both qacA/B and blaZ genes varied from approximately 20 to 40 kb. The Staphylococcus epidermidis Fol62 isolate, harboring multiresistance plasmid pMS62, contained qacA/B and blaZ together with tetK. Molecular and genetic studies indicated different structural arrangements of blaZ and qacA/B, including variable intergenic distances and transcriptional directions of the two genes on the same plasmid within the strains. The different organizations may be due to the presence of various genetic elements involved in cointegration, recombination, and rearrangements. These results indicate that qac resistance genes are common and that linkage between resistance to disinfectants and penicillin resistance occurs frequently in clinical isolates in Norway. Moreover, the higher frequency of antibiotic resistance among BC-resistant strains indicates that the presence of either resistance determinant selects for the other during antimicrobial therapy and disinfection in hospitals.
PubMed ID
12183231 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indigenous bacterial spores as indicators of Cryptosporidium inactivation using chlorine dioxide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178286
Source
J Water Health. 2003 Jun;1(2):91-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Sophie Verhille
Ron Hofmann
Christian Chauret
Robert Andrews
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Water Health. 2003 Jun;1(2):91-100
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Chlorine Compounds - pharmacology
Cryptosporidium parvum - drug effects - growth & development
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Disinfection - methods
Humans
Oxides - pharmacology
Spores, Bacterial - drug effects - growth & development
Time Factors
United States
Water Microbiology
Water Purification - methods - standards
Abstract
This objective of this study was to explore the practicality of monitoring naturally occurring organisms to predict drinking water treatment plant performance, in this case for the reduction of Cryptosporidium. Surface and ground water from seven drinking water treatment plants across North America that use chlorine dioxide were surveyed for aerobic and anaerobic bacterial spore concentrations. The concentrations of total spores were usually high enough in both raw and treated water to allow 4- to 5-log reductions to be observed across the treatment train by filtering up to 2 l of sample. These results suggested that naturally occurring treatment-resistant spores could be candidates as indicators of treatment performance. However, to be useful as indicators for Cryptosporidium reduction, the organisms would have to exhibit similar resistances to disinfection (chlorine dioxide in this case) in order to be useful. The inactivation kinetics of seven of the most common species were determined, and all were observed to be considerably more susceptible to chlorine dioxide inactivation than Cryptosporidium as reported in the literature. This study therefore did not identify an appropriate ambient microbial indicator for Cryptosporidium control.
PubMed ID
15382738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multilocus sequence typing and biocide tolerance of Arcobacter butzleri from Danish broiler carcasses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108067
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2013;6:322
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Louise Hesselbjerg Rasmussen
Jette Kjeldgaard
Jens Peter Christensen
Hanne Ingmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Stigboejlen 4, DK-1870 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2013;6:322
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs - instrumentation
Animals
Arcobacter - classification - drug effects - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Chickens - microbiology
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Denmark
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Equipment Contamination - prevention & control
Equipment Design
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
Phylogeny
Sodium Hypochlorite - pharmacology
Abstract
Arcobacter spp. have in recent years received increasing interest as potential emerging enteropathogens and zoonotic agents. They are associated with various animals including poultry and can be isolated from meat products. The possibilities of persistence and cross-contamination in slaughterhouses during meat processing are not well established. We have evaluated the occurrence and persistence of Arcobacter spp. in a Danish slaughterhouse and determined the sensitivity of isolates to sodium hypochlorite, a commonly used biocide.
Arcobacter contamination was examined in a broiler slaughterhouse by selective enrichment of 235 swabs from the processing line during two production days and after sanitizing in between. In total 13.6% of samples were positive for A. butzleri with the majority (29 of 32 isolates) originating from the evisceration machine. No Arcobacter spp. was isolated after cleaning. A. butzleri isolates confirmed by PCR were typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) resulting in 10 new sequence types (STs). Two sequence types were isolated on both processing days. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to sodium hypochlorite was determined to 0.5% hypochlorite biocide (500 ppm chlorine) for most isolates, which allows growth of A. butzleri within the working concentration of the biocide (0.2 - 0.5%).
A. butzleri was readily isolated from a Danish broiler slaughterhouse, primarily in the evisceration machine. Typing by MLST showed high strain variability but the recurrence of two STs indicate that some persistence or cross-contamination takes place. Importantly, the isolates tolerated sodium hypochlorite, a biocide commonly employed in slaughterhouse sanitizing, at levels close to the disinfection concentration, and thus, A. butzleri may survive the disinfection process although this was not observed in our study.
Notes
Cites: J Microbiol Methods. 2007 Feb;68(2):408-1317097175
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2006 May 25;109(1-2):139-4516516995
Cites: Int Microbiol. 2007 Jun;10(2):85-9017661285
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2007 Nov 1;23(21):2947-817846036
Cites: PLoS One. 2007;2(12):e135818159241
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Jul 31;125(3):223-918579247
Cites: J Appl Microbiol. 2008 Aug;105(2):443-5118298536
Cites: Poult Sci. 2008 Nov;87(11):2404-718931194
Cites: J Food Prot. 2008 Dec;71(12):2533-619244910
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 May 31;131(2-3):256-919297052
Cites: BMC Microbiol. 2009;9:19619751525
Cites: J Microbiol Methods. 2010 Mar;80(3):281-620096309
Cites: J Food Prot. 2010 Jul;73(7):1313-620615344
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2011 Feb;61(Pt 2):356-6120305065
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2011 Oct;28(10):2731-921546353
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2000 Dec 1;193(1):89-9411094284
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2001 Dec 30;71(2-3):189-9611789937
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2002 May;68(5):2172-811976086
Cites: Lett Appl Microbiol. 2002;35(2):141-512100590
Cites: J Food Prot. 2002 Aug;65(8):1233-912182473
Cites: J Food Prot. 2002 Aug;65(8):1240-712182474
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Jan;38(1):286-9110618103
Cites: Lett Appl Microbiol. 2000 Mar;30(3):207-1210747252
Cites: J Formos Med Assoc. 2000 Feb;99(2):166-910770033
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2000 May;66(5):1994-200010788372
Cites: J Food Prot. 2003 Mar;66(3):364-912636286
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2003 May 19;93(2):153-812637003
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2003 Dec 12;229(2):243-814680706
Cites: Poult Sci. 2003 Dec;82(12):1898-90214717547
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2004 Feb 1;90(3):303-814751685
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2004 Feb 15;91(1):31-4114967558
Cites: J Food Prot. 2004 Apr;67(4):799-80415083734
Cites: Lett Appl Microbiol. 2004;38(4):339-4415214736
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Oct;10(10):1863-715504280
Cites: Vet Rec. 1977 May 21;100(21):451-2560078
Cites: Vet Rec. 1978 Feb 4;102(5):106416554
Cites: Int J Syst Bacteriol. 1992 Jul;42(3):344-561503968
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1992 Sep;30(9):2335-71400998
Cites: J Infect. 1995 Nov;31(3):225-78586843
Cites: J Appl Microbiol. 1997 Nov;83(5):619-269418023
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2005 Jul 15;102(2):127-3515982771
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Feb;12(2):307-916494760
Cites: Poult Sci. 2007 Apr;86(4):744-5117369548
PubMed ID
23941403 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ongoing battle against multi-resistant strains: in-vitro inhibition of hospital-acquired MRSA, VRE, Pseudomonas, ESBL E. coli and Klebsiella species in the presence of plant-derived antiseptic oils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118508
Source
J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2013 Jun;41(4):321-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Patrick H Warnke
Alexander J S Lott
Eugene Sherry
Joerg Wiltfang
Rainer Podschun
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. pwarnke@hotmail.com
Source
J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2013 Jun;41(4):321-6
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - pharmacology
Chlorhexidine - pharmacology
Cymbopogon
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - drug effects
Enterococcus - drug effects
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Ethanol - pharmacology
Eucalyptus
Humans
Immunodiffusion
Klebsiella pneumoniae - drug effects
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects
Monoterpenes - pharmacology
Oils, Volatile - pharmacology
Phytotherapy - methods
Plant Oils - pharmacology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects
Tea Tree Oil - pharmacology
Terpenes - pharmacology
Vancomycin Resistance
beta-Lactamases - drug effects
Abstract
The fight against hospital-acquired infections involving antibiotic-resistant microorganisms has become of critical concern to surgeons worldwide. In addition to the development of new effective antibiotic chemotherapy, exploration of 'forgotten' topical antibacterial agents from the pre-antibiotic era has recently gained new attention. We report the promising efficacy of plant-derived antiseptic oils used in traditional aboriginal and south-east Asian treatments such as Lemongrass, Eucalyptus and Tea Tree Oil in the inhibition of clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the in-vitro setting. Large consistent zones of inhibition were observed for all three plant-derived oils tested in an agar diffusion test. The commonly used antibacterial agents chlorhexidine 0.1%, and ethanol (70%), and standard olive oil consistently demonstrated notably lower or no efficacy in regard to growth inhibition of strains. Notably, Lemongrass oil proved to be particularly active against gram-positive bacteria, while Tea Tree oil showed superior inhibition of gram-negative microorganisms. As proven in vitro, plant-derived antiseptic oils may represent a promising and affordable topical agent to support surgical treatment against multi-resistant and hospital-acquired infections.
PubMed ID
23199627 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pollution of modern metalworking fluids containing biocides by pathogenic bacteria in France. Reexamination of chemical treatments accuracy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215959
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1995 Feb;11(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
P M Chazal
Author Affiliation
Unité de Microbiologie, Traitement des Eaux et des Déchets, UFR des Sciences, Limoges, France.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1995 Feb;11(1):1-7
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colony Count, Microbial
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Emulsions
Formaldehyde - pharmacology
France
Humans
Klebsiella pneumoniae - drug effects - isolation & purification - physiology
Metallurgy
Metals
Pseudomonas - physiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects - isolation & purification - physiology
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution
Abstract
Pollution by pathogenic bacteria was examined in 150 French metalworking fluid samples. Gram-negative micro-organisms such as Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Vibrio spp. as well as Gram-positive cocci were never isolated. Nevertheless opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae still contaminated these fluids with an isolation frequency of 17% of samples for each. These two micro-organisms failed to grow or even survive in vitro in sterile cutting fluids protected by biocides. Preliminary growth of other micro-organisms such as Pseudomonas putida or Pseudomonas fluorescens, which are the major part of the indigenous microflora, seemed to be a prerequisite for their growth. These former two Pseudomonas could resist three different classes of biocides and, at least in the case of formaldehyde-releasers, adaptation was followed by biocide deterioration. Resistance magnification was observed in the presence of the three different types of biocides and, in the case of formaldehyde releasers the resistance and deterioration levels were close to those recommended by the manufacturers. This is probably the reason why the preliminary growth of Pseudomonas putida allowed in vitro differed growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Due to relatively high isolation frequencies of opportunistic pathogens (17% of samples) periodical microbiological examination of cutting fluids should be carried out in order to evaluate risks for human health. Wearing masks and gloves is still recommended, at least in France.
PubMed ID
7489767 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.