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Intensified hand-hygiene campaign including soap-and-water wash may prevent acute infections in office workers, as shown by a recognized-exposure -adjusted analysis of a randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283549
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Jan 09;17(1):47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-09-2017
Author
Tapani Hovi
Jukka Ollgren
Carita Savolainen-Kopra
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Jan 09;17(1):47
Date
Jan-09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Disinfectants - chemistry - pharmacology
Ethanol
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hand Disinfection - methods
Humans
Infection Control - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Seasons
Self Report
Sick Leave
Soaps
Workplace
Abstract
Variable exposure to causative agents of acute respiratory (RTI) or gastrointestinal tract infections (GTI) is a significant confounding factor in the analysis of the efficacy of interventions concerning these infections. We had an exceptional opportunity to reanalyze a previously published dataset from a trial assessing the effect of enhanced hand hygiene on the occurrence of RTI or GTI in adults, after adjustment for reported exposure and other covariates.
Twenty-one working units (designated clusters) each including at least 50 office employees, totaling 1,270 persons, were randomized into two intervention arms (either using water-and-soap or alcohol-rub in hand cleansing), or in the control arm. Self-reported data was collected through weekly emails and included own symptoms of RTI or GTI, and exposures to other persons with similar symptoms. Differences in the weekly occurrences of RTI and GTI symptoms between the arms were analyzed using multilevel binary regression model with log link with personal and cluster specific random effects, self-reported exposure to homologous disease, randomization triplet, and seasonality as covariates in the Bayesian framework.
Over the 16 months duration of the trial, 297 persons in the soap and water arm, 238 persons in the alcohol-based hand rub arm, and 230 controls sent reports. The arms were similar in age distribution and gender ratios. A temporally-associated reported exposure strongly increased the risk of both types of infection in all trial arms. Persons in the soap-and-water arm reported a significantly - about 24% lower weekly prevalence of GTI than the controls whether they had observed an exposure or not during the preceding week, while for RTI, this intervention reduced the prevalence only during weeks without a reported exposure. Alcohol-rub did not affect the symptom prevalence.
We conclude that while frequent and careful hand washing with soap and water partially protected office-working adults from GTI, the effect on RTI was only marginal in this study. Potential reasons for this difference include partially different transmission routes and a difference in the virus load. In this trial, frequent standardized hand rubbing with ethanol-based disinfectant did not reduce the weekly prevalence of either type of infections.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00821509, 12 March 2009.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28068912 View in PubMed
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Treatment of Arctic wastewater by chemical coagulation, UV and peracetic acid disinfection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297769
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32851-32859
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Ravi Kumar Chhetri
Ewa Klupsch
Henrik Rasmus Andersen
Pernille Erland Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet, Building 115, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32851-32859
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - drug effects - radiation effects
Denmark
Disinfectants - chemistry - pharmacology
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus - drug effects - radiation effects
Escherichia coli - drug effects - radiation effects
Greenland
Heterotrophic Processes
Peracetic Acid - chemistry - pharmacology
Ultraviolet Rays
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Conventional wastewater treatment is challenging in the Arctic region due to the cold climate and scattered population. Thus, no wastewater treatment plant exists in Greenland, and raw wastewater is discharged directly to nearby waterbodies without treatment. We investigated the efficiency of physicochemical wastewater treatment, in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Raw wastewater from Kangerlussuaq was treated by chemical coagulation and UV disinfection. By applying 7.5 mg Al/L polyaluminium chloride (PAX XL100), 73% of turbidity and 28% phosphate was removed from raw wastewater. E. coli and Enterococcus were removed by 4 and 2.5 log, respectively, when UV irradiation of 0.70 kWh/m3 was applied to coagulated wastewater. Furthermore, coagulated raw wastewater in Denmark, which has a chemical quality similar to Greenlandic wastewater, was disinfected by peracetic acid or UV irradiation. Removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 6 and 12 mg/L peracetic acid was 2.8 and 3.1 log, respectively. Similarly, removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 0.21 and 2.10 kWh/m3 for UV irradiation was 2.1 and greater than 4 log, respectively. Physicochemical treatment of raw wastewater followed by UV irradiation and/or peracetic acid disinfection showed the potential for treatment of arctic wastewater.
PubMed ID
28210951 View in PubMed
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