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247 records – page 1 of 25.

The 1988 and 2002 phocine distemper virus epidemics in European harbour seals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6586
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Jan 30;68(2):115-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2006
Author
Tero Härkönen
Rune Dietz
Peter Reijnders
Jonas Teilmann
Karin Harding
Ailsa Hall
Sophie Brasseur
Ursula Siebert
Simon J Goodman
Paul D Jepson
Thomas Dau Rasmussen
Paul Thompson
Author Affiliation
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden. tero.harkonen@swipnet.se
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Jan 30;68(2):115-30
Date
Jan-30-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Carnivora
Comparative Study
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Disease Reservoirs - veterinary
Disease Vectors
Distemper - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Distemper Virus, Phocine
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Male
Morbillivirus - classification - pathogenicity
Phoca - virology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
We present new and revised data for the phocine distemper virus (PDV) epidemics that resulted in the deaths of more than 23 000 harbour seals Phoca vitulina in 1988 and 30,000 in 2002. On both occasions the epidemics started at the Danish island of Anholt in central Kattegat, and subsequently spread to adjacent colonies in a stepwise fashion. However, this pattern was not maintained throughout the epidemics and new centres of infection appeared far from infected populations on some occasions: in 1988 early positive cases were observed in the Irish Sea, and in 2002 the epidemic appeared in the Dutch Wadden Sea, 6 wk after the initiation of the outbreak at Anholt Island. Since the harbour seal is a rather sedentary species, such 'jumps' in the spread among colonies suggest that another vector species could have been involved. We discussed the role of sympatric species as disease vectors, and suggested that grey seal populations could act as reservoirs for PDV if infection rates in sympatric species are lower than in harbour seals. Alternatively, grey seals could act as subclinical infected carriers of the virus between Arctic and North Sea seal populations. Mixed colonies of grey and harbour seal colonies are found at all locations where the jumps occurred. It seems likely that grey seals, which show long-distance movements, contributed to the spread among regions. The harbour seal populations along the Norwegian coast and in the Baltic escaped both epidemics, which could be due either to genetic differences among harbour seal populations or to immunity. Catastrophic events such as repeated epidemics should be accounted for in future models and management strategies of wildlife populations.
PubMed ID
16532603 View in PubMed
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The 2000 tularemia outbreak: a case-control study of risk factors in disease-endemic and emergent areas, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188853
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):956-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Henrik Eliasson
Johan Lindbäck
J Pekka Nuorti
Malin Arneborn
Johan Giesecke
Anders Tegnell
Author Affiliation
Orebro University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):956-60
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bites and Stings - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Cat Diseases - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Culicidae - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Vectors
Female
Francisella tularensis
Humans
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tularemia - epidemiology - pathology - transmission
Abstract
A widespread outbreak of tularemia in Sweden in 2000 was investigated in a case-control study in which 270 reported cases of tularemia were compared with 438 controls. The outbreak affected parts of Sweden where tularemia had hitherto been rare, and these "emergent" areas were compared with the disease-endemic areas. Multivariate regression analysis showed mosquito bites to be the main risk factor, with an odds ratio (OR) of 8.8. Other risk factors were owning a cat (OR 2.5) and farm work (OR 3.2). Farming was a risk factor only in the disease-endemic area. Swollen lymph nodes and wound infections were more common in the emergent area, while pneumonia was more common in the disease-endemic area. Mosquito bites appear to be important in transmission of tularemia. The association between cat ownership and disease merits further investigation.
Notes
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Cites: J Infect Dis. 1970 Mar;121(3):357-95415053
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1971;3(1):7-165099427
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1975 Feb;131(2):197-91167886
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Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1991 May 15;133(10):1032-82035503
PubMed ID
12194773 View in PubMed
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[A 2nd natural focus of Q fever in the North-West RSFSR].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109787
Source
Tr Leningr Nauchnoissled Inst Epidemiol Mikrobiol. 1970;37:41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970

[A case of human infection with brucellosis from a cat]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36213
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Repina
A I Nikulina
I A Kosilov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Vectors
English Abstract
Female
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Mice
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
The epidemiological study of a focus of Brucella infection revealed that an outbreak of brucellosis occurred in a small town, and the source of this infection was a domestic cat. As the result of contacts with this cat, six persons, among them three children aged 3, 8 and 12 years, had brucellosis. In all these patients acute brucellosis was diagnosed. Simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of the disease, a rise in antibody titer from 1:50 to 1:1,600 was observed. Brucella cultures isolated from the blood of one of the patients and from the internal organs of the cat exhibited the properties, similar to those of "rodent" strains, i. e. their differential signs permit their classification with B. suis, serovar 5.
PubMed ID
8067119 View in PubMed
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[A case of tularemia infection on Wrangel Island].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235630
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):118-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1987
Author
R A Savel'eva
I S Meshcheriakova
L S Kamennova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):118-9
Date
Feb-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Arvicolinae
Disease Vectors
Humans
Male
Siberia
Tularemia - pathology - transmission
PubMed ID
3554848 View in PubMed
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[A complex of blood-sucking mosquitoes (Diptera, Culicidae) in the focus of West Nile fever in the Volgograd Region. III. Species feeding on birds and man and the rhythms of their nocturnal activity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158763
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2007 Oct-Dec;(4):37-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu V Lopatina
O V Bezzhonova
M V Fedorova
T V Bulgakova
A E Platonov
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2007 Oct-Dec;(4):37-43
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chickens
Circadian Rhythm
Culicidae - classification
Disease Vectors - classification
Ecosystem
Humans
Insect Bites and Stings - classification
Population Density
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Seasons
Species Specificity
West Nile Fever - prevention & control
Abstract
The rate and nocturnal rhythm of mosquito attacks of birds and human beings were studied in the open biotopes of Volgograd and its vicinity in 2004. Thirteen and 11 species of the subfamily Culicinae were collected under the Berezantsev bell and from the traps containing a chicken (a hen), respectively; of them 9 species were common. The mosquitoes of an Anopheles maculipennis complex were caught in a small portion to the traps of both types. Most species of Aedes were highly anthropophilic, showed the minimum activity at night and their abundance considerably decreased by the early transmission period. Among the species that were active during the transmission period, Ae. vexans, Coq. richiardii, and Cx. modestus more intensively attacked a human being than birds and Cx. pipiens was frequently attracted into the hen traps. The attraction of each species of the caught varied during the transmission period. The maximum attacks of Cx. modestus and Cx. pipiens on man and birds coincide and those of Coq. Richiardii and Cx. pipiens on man was observed earlier than on birds. A possible role of mosquitoes of different species in the epizootic and epidemiological processes is discussed.
PubMed ID
18277420 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activation of natural tularemia foci of the field-meadow and steppe types on the territory of Tula Province 1977-1978].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243441
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1982 Mar;(3):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
Z A Levacheva
A G Lobkovskii
V V Tikhonenko
M A Belova
M P Dolotova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1982 Mar;(3):36-40
Date
Mar-1982
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arthropod Vectors
Arvicolinae - microbiology
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Francisella tularensis - immunology
Geography
Humans
Rural Population
Russia
Ticks - microbiology
Tularemia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Urban Population
Abstract
Natural tularemia foci of the meadow and steppe type are extremely stable and become active in those years when the most favourable living conditions for rodents appear. For the first time during the last 30 years a great increase in the number of common voles, accompanied by widely spread epizooty covering the whole territory of the Tula region, was observed. House mice, common field mice, harvest mice and black rats were also involved in this epizooty and 235 tularemia patients with all clinical forms of the disease were registered, the pulmonary form of the disease being prevalent. The cases of the disease were observed among both urban and rural population. In spite of a high morbidity rate, no cases of group infection were registered in domestic conditions and among agricultural workers due to the existence of the numerous immune layer among the population. The formation of this layer resulted from planned vaccinal prophylaxis covering, on the average, 86.3% of the rural population of the region.
PubMed ID
6211008 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A hantavirus killed an Israeli researcher: hazards while working with wild animals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258692
Source
Harefuah. 2014 Aug;153(8):443-4, 499
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Eitan Israeli
Source
Harefuah. 2014 Aug;153(8):443-4, 499
Date
Aug-2014
Language
Hebrew
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Finland - epidemiology
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points - methods
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - mortality - physiopathology - prevention & control - virology
Humans
Mice
Puumala virus - pathogenicity
Rats
Research Personnel
Ribavirin - therapeutic use
Abstract
An Israeli researcher working in Finland with Bank Voles, contracted an infectious viral disease and died. This was a rare event, but it is important to learn about this class of viruses and to be aware of the hazards while working in the field in close contact with wild animals. The virus termed Puumala belongs to the genus Hanta from the Bunyaviridae family. The natural reservoir is rodents, mice, rats and Bank Votes for the Puuamala strain. The disease is termed HFRS (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome), is prevalent in Asia and Europe, affecting 200,000 people a year, with 5-15% percent mortality (although in Finland mortality rate is 0.1%). The New World strains cause HPS (hemorrhagic pulmonary syndrome) affecting 200 people a year with 40% mortality. Virus is present in all rodents excretions, and route of infection is by aerosols, hand to mucus membranes contamination, by rodents bites and by contaminated food or water. More than 226 work related infections were documented. Treatment with Ribavirin helps in HFRS but not in HPS. The virus is stable in the environment for long periods, and research must be carried out at biosafety level 3. Working outdoors in rodent infested area, should be carried out using protective clothing, gloves, googles and face mask whenever aerosol producing tasks are performed. Both indoor and outdoor, it is important to adhere to self-hygienic procedures, especially hand washing.
PubMed ID
25286630 View in PubMed
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247 records – page 1 of 25.