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Out of the bush: the Asian bush mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald, 1901) (Diptera, Culicidae) becomes invasive.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105078
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2014;7:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Helge Kampen
Doreen Werner
Author Affiliation
Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Südufer 10, Greifswald - Insel Riems 17493, Germany. helge.kampen@fli.bund.de.
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2014;7:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aedes - physiology
Animals
Disease Vectors
Humans
Population Dynamics
Abstract
The Asian bush or rock pool mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus is one of the most expansive culicid species of the world. Being native to East Asia, this species was detected out of its original distribution range for the first time in the early 1990s in New Zealand where it could not establish, though. In 1998, established populations were reported from the eastern US, most likely as a result of introductions several years earlier. After a massive spread the mosquito is now widely distributed in eastern North America including Canada and two US states on the western coast. In the year 2000, it was demonstrated for the first time in Europe, continental France, but could be eliminated. A population that had appeared in Belgium in 2002 was not controlled until 2012 as it did not propagate. In 2008, immature developmental stages were discovered in a large area in northern Switzerland and bordering parts of Germany. Subsequent studies in Germany showed a wide distribution and several populations of the mosquito in various federal states. Also in 2011, the species was found in southeastern Austria (Styria) and neighbouring Slovenia. In 2013, a population was detected in the Central Netherlands, specimens were collected in southern Alsace, France, and the complete northeastern part of Slovenia was found colonized, with specimens also present across borders in adjacent Croatia. Apparently, at the end of 2013 a total of six populations occurred in Europe although it is not clear whether all of them are completely isolated. Similarly, it is not known whether these populations go back to the same number of introductions. While entry ports and long-distance continental migration routes are also obscure, it is likely that the international used tyre trade is the most important mode of intercontinental transportation of the mosquito. Aedes j. japonicus does not only display an aggressive biting behaviour but is suspected to be a vector of various disease agents and to displace indigenous culicid species. Therefore, Aedes j. japonicus might both cause public health problems in the future and have a significant impact on the biodiversity of the invaded territories.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24495418 View in PubMed
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[The role of cows in the formation of foci of jaundice-less leptospirosis in the Amur region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111741
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1966 Aug;43(8):147
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1966
Author
N D Mazurin
I I Anokhin
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1966 Aug;43(8):147
Date
Aug-1966
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Disease Vectors
Humans
Leptospirosis - etiology
Siberia
PubMed ID
6004755 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Observations on houseflies, vectors of enteric infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108834
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1965 Sep-Oct;34(5):525-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Zaidenov
M I Kondrashova
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1965 Sep-Oct;34(5):525-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Vectors
Enteritis - epidemiology
Houseflies
Humans
Russia
PubMed ID
4226337 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Structure of natural foci of tularemia in the catchment areas of small and medium rivers. II. Epizootiological nature of elementary foci].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256079
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1971 Oct;48(10):108-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1971
Author
V L Adamovich
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1971 Oct;48(10):108-13
Date
Oct-1971
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Humans
Russia
Tularemia - epidemiology
PubMed ID
4256497 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tularemia in Huron County, Ontario, 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109851
Source
Can J Public Health. 1969 Nov;60(11):447-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1969
Author
G P Evans
Source
Can J Public Health. 1969 Nov;60(11):447-9
Date
Nov-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Disease Vectors
Humans
Male
Ontario
Tularemia - pathology
PubMed ID
5389771 View in PubMed
Less detail

Zoonotic diseases in Canada: an interdisciplinary challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211274
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Aug 15;155(4):413-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1996
Author
J. Hamilton
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Aug 15;155(4):413-8
Date
Aug-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Humans
Prevalence
Zoonoses - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
Although zoonotic diseases are generally rare in Canada, a wide range of pathogens can be transmitted from animal reservoirs to humans through insect vectors or direct contact with wild and domestic animals. Across the country researchers with backgrounds ranging from wildlife biology to parasitology and epidemiology are tracking a variety of zoonotic diseases, some of which are causing increasing concern among public health officials.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8752067 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Outbreak of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256133
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Voen Med Zh. 1971 Sep;9:71-2
Publication Type
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Sep-1971

[Tularemia in the Orenburg region. I].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111923
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1966 May;43(5):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1966
Author
L A Volkova
G V Iushkin
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1966 May;43(5):14-8
Date
May-1966
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Humans
Russia
Tularemia - epidemiology - etiology
PubMed ID
4238435 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Distribution of local Oncomelania snail infestation without aboriginal human schistosomiasis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240260
Source
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 1984 Aug;5(4):219-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984
Author
S Y He
Source
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 1984 Aug;5(4):219-22
Date
Aug-1984
Language
Chinese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Vectors
Female
Humans
Male
Schistosomiasis - transmission
Snails - parasitology
PubMed ID
6509530 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A case of tularemia infection on Wrangel Island].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235630
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):118-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1987
Author
R A Savel'eva
I S Meshcheriakova
L S Kamennova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):118-9
Date
Feb-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Arvicolinae
Disease Vectors
Humans
Male
Siberia
Tularemia - pathology - transmission
PubMed ID
3554848 View in PubMed
Less detail

249 records – page 1 of 25.