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Chlamydia trachomatis in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207746
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Aug 1;23(15):113-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1997
Author
S. Squires
B. Chaly
T. Wilk
J. Doherty
Author Affiliation
Division of STD Prevention and Control, Bureau of HIV/AIDS and STD, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Aug 1;23(15):113-20
Date
Aug-1-1997
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Disease Transmission, Infectious - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Notes
Erratum In: Can Commun Dis Rep 1997 Nov 15;23(22):175
PubMed ID
9439038 View in PubMed
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The lack of association between bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination and clustering of Aboriginals with tuberculosis in western Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174942
Source
Can Respir J. 2005 Apr;12(3):134-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Victoria J Cook
Eduardo Hernández-Garduño
Dennis Kunimoto
Earl S Hershfield
E Anne Fanning
Vernon H Hoeppner
R Kevin Elwood
J Mark FitzGerald
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Can Respir J. 2005 Apr;12(3):134-8
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
BCG Vaccine
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Disease Transmission, Infectious - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - isolation & purification
Sex Distribution
Tuberculosis - ethnology - microbiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem for Aboriginal people in Canada, with high rates of clustering of active TB cases. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination has been used as a preventive measure against TB in this high-risk population.
The study was designed to determine if BCG vaccination in Aboriginal people influenced recent TB transmission through an analysis of the clustering of TB cases.
A retrospective analysis of all culture-positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases in Aboriginal people in western Canada (1995 to 1997) was performed. Isolates were analyzed using standard methodology for restriction fragment length polymorphism and spoligotyping.
Of 256 culture-positive Aboriginal TB cases, BCG status was confirmed in 216 (84%) cases; 34% had been vaccinated with BCG, 57% were male and 56% were living on-reserve. Patients who had been vaccinated with BCG were younger than unvaccinated individuals (mean age 32.4+/-1.65 years versus 45.0+/-1.8 years, P
Notes
Comment In: Can Respir J. 2005 Apr;12(3):120-115929223
PubMed ID
15875064 View in PubMed
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Lack of evidence of sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus in a prospective cohort study of men who have sex with men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176061
Source
Am J Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):502-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Michel Alary
Jean R Joly
Jean Vincelette
René Lavoie
Bruno Turmel
Robert S Remis
Author Affiliation
FRCPC, MSPH, MBA, Laboratoire de santé publique du Québec, 20045 chemin Sainte-Marie, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec H9X 3R5 Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):502-5
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Condoms - utilization
Disease Transmission, Infectious - statistics & numerical data
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis C - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Homosexuality, Male - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening
Needle Sharing - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We studied the prevalence and incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the ongoing Omega Cohort Study of men who have sex with men (MSM).
From January to September 2001, consenting men (n = 1085) attending a follow-up visit to the ongoing Omega Cohort Study were tested for HCV. If the test results were positive for HCV, we compared them with test results from previous serum samples collected from the time of entry into the original cohort study to determine the time of infection.
HCV prevalence at entry was 2.9% and was strongly associated with injection drug use (32.9% vs 0.3%, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
15727984 View in PubMed
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Mode of transmission, rather than the hepatitis C virus, as a major determinant of poor interpersonal relationships in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159801
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Dec;21(12):815-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
T P LA
M. Deschênes
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Dec;21(12):815-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Female
Hepacivirus - isolation & purification
Hepatitis C, Chronic - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Quebec - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated that patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have significant neurocognitive impairment.
To assess whether chronic HCV infection impacts on patient marital status, living arrangement and employment.
The charts of patients with chronic hepatitis C and hepatitis B were reviewed.
The mean (+/- SD) age of the 129 patients with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) was 46+/-15 years and that of the 428 patients with HCV was 48+/-15 years. Sixty-seven per cent of HBV patients were men, compared with 68% of HCV patients. Eighty per cent of HCV patients were Caucasian, compared with 44% of patients with HBV. The main modes of transmission were intravenous drug use (37%) and transfusion of blood products (37%) for HCV, compared with country of origin (76%) for HBV. There were no differences in marital status rates between HBV- and HCV-infected patients (HBV - married (73%), single (21%) and divorced (6%); and HCV - married (66%), single (23%) and divorced (10%); P=0.20). HCV patients lived alone more often than HBV patients (HBV - 13%, HCV - 22%; P=0.03). There was no difference in overall employment rate between HCV and HBV patients (81% versus 87%; P=0.15). Though there may not have been overall differences between HCV and HBV marital status and employment status, there were differences in the HCV subgroups. These subgroup differences were discovered in the multivariate analysis; mode of transmission was identified as the only predictor of the patients' marital status and employment status.
The most important determinant of interpersonal relationships was the mode of transmission of the viral hepatitis rather than the type of viral infection: past intravenous drug users had lower level relationships.
Notes
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Cites: Hepatology. 1999 Nov;30(5):1299-30110534353
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Cites: Hepatology. 2002 Feb;35(2):433-911826420
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Cites: Hepatology. 1998 Jan;27(1):209-129425939
Cites: Dig Dis Sci. 1997 Jan;42(1):186-919009136
Cites: J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2003 Sep;9(6):847-5414632243
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2003 Oct;18(10):835-4414521647
Cites: J Hepatol. 2003 Aug;39(2):231-812873820
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Cites: Hepatology. 2002 Feb;35(2):440-611826421
PubMed ID
18080053 View in PubMed
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Morbidity of pertussis in adolescents and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197985
Source
J Infect Dis. 2000 Jul;182(1):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
G. De Serres
R. Shadmani
B. Duval
N. Boulianne
P. Déry
M. Douville Fradet
L. Rochette
S A Halperin
Author Affiliation
Centre de Santé Publique de Québec, Beauport, Quebec, G1E 7G9 Canada. gdeserres@cspq.qc.ca
Source
J Infect Dis. 2000 Jul;182(1):174-9
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Asthma - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Transmission, Infectious - prevention & control
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Morbidity
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Change
Whooping Cough - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
The effect of age on the clinical presentation of pertussis was assessed in 664 adolescent and adult cases. Complications were more frequent in adults than in adolescents (28% vs. 16%). Pneumonia occurred in 2% of patients /=50 years old. Duration of cough, risk of sinusitis, and number of nights with disturbed sleep increased with smoking and asthma. The secondary attack rate in other household members >/=12 years was 11%. Pertussis in secondary case patients was less severe than in index case patients but presented with classic symptoms. The main source of infection in adolescents was schoolmates or friends; in adults it was workplace or their children. Teachers and health care workers had a greater risk of pertussis than did the general population. The burden of disease appears to increase with age, with smoking, and with asthma.
PubMed ID
10882595 View in PubMed
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Pediatric injuries from needles discarded in the community: epidemiology and risk of seroconversion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155861
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Aug;122(2):e487-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Jesse Papenburg
Denis Blais
Dorothy Moore
Mohammed Al-Hosni
Céline Laferrière
Bruce Tapiero
Caroline Quach
Author Affiliation
Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Aug;122(2):e487-92
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Analysis of Variance
Blood-Borne Pathogens - isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Incidence
Male
Needles - adverse effects - virology
Needlestick Injuries - epidemiology
Probability
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Urban Population
Abstract
Although anxiety exists concerning the perceived risk of transmission of bloodborne viruses after community-acquired needlestick injuries, seroconversion seems to be rare. The objectives of this study were to describe the epidemiology of pediatric community-acquired needlestick injuries and to estimate the risk of seroconversion for HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus in these events.
The study population included all of the children presenting with community-acquired needlestick injuries to the Montreal Children's Hospital between 1988 and 2006 and to H?pital Sainte-Justine between 1995 and 2006. Data were collected prospectively at H?pital Sainte-Justine from 2001 to 2006. All of the other data were reviewed retrospectively by using a standardized case report form.
A total of 274 patients were identified over a period of 19 years. Mean age was 7.9 +/- 3.4 years. A total of 176 (64.2%) were boys. Most injuries occurred in streets (29.2%) or parks (24.1%), and 64.6% of children purposely picked up the needle. Only 36 patients (13.1%) noted blood on the device. Among the 230 patients not known to be immune for hepatitis B virus, 189 (82.2%) received hepatitis B immunoglobulin, and 213 (92.6%) received hepatitis B virus vaccine. Prophylactic antiretroviral therapy was offered beginning in 1997. Of the 210 patients who presented thereafter, 82 (39.0%) received chemoprophylaxis, of whom 69 (84.1%) completed a 4-week course of therapy. The use of a protease inhibitor was not associated with a significantly higher risk of adverse effects or early discontinuation of therapy. At 6 months, 189 were tested for HIV, 167 for hepatitis B virus, and 159 for hepatitis C virus. There were no seroconversions.
We observed no seroconversions in 274 pediatric community-acquired needlestick injuries, thereby confirming that the risk of transmission of bloodborne viruses in these events is very low.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatrics. 2008 Dec;122(6):1405; author reply 1405-619047264
PubMed ID
18676535 View in PubMed
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Sexual networks and sexually transmitted infections: a tale of two cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193200
Source
J Urban Health. 2001 Sep;78(3):433-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
A M Jolly
S Q Muth
J L Wylie
J J Potterat
Author Affiliation
The Division of STD Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centres for Disease Control, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ann_jolly@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2001 Sep;78(3):433-45
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group
Age Distribution
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Colorado - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Contact Tracing - methods
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Neural Networks (Computer)
Phenotype
Population Surveillance
Risk-Taking
Sex Distribution
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Social Support
Sociometric Techniques
Abstract
Research on risk behaviors for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) has revealed that they seldom correspond with actual risk of infection. Core groups of people with high-risk behavior who form networks of people linked by sexual contact are essential for STI transmission, but have been overlooked in epidemiological studies. Social network analysis, a subdiscipline of sociology, provides both the methods and analytical techniques to describe and illustrate the effects of sexual networks on STI transmission. Sexual networks of people from Colorado Springs, Colorado, and from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, infected with chlamydia during a 6-month period were compared. In Winnipeg, 442 networks were identified, comprising 571 cases and 663 contacts, ranging in size from 2 to 20 individuals; Colorado Springs data yielded 401 networks, comprising 468 cases and 700 contacts, ranging in size from 2 to 12 individuals. Taking differing partner notification methods and the slightly smaller population size in Colorado Springs into account, the networks from both places were similar in both size and structure. These smaller, sparsely linked networks, peripheral to the core, may form the mechanism by which chlamydia can remain endemic, in contrast with larger, more densely connected networks, closer to the core, which are associated with steep rises in incidence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11564847 View in PubMed
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Two feet-one hand syndrome: a retrospective multicenter survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207402
Source
Int J Dermatol. 1997 Sep;36(9):658-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
C R Daniel
A K Gupta
M P Daniel
C M Daniel
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, USA.
Source
Int J Dermatol. 1997 Sep;36(9):658-60
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Data Collection
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Ontario - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Syndrome
Tinea - epidemiology
Tinea Pedis - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
The two feet-one hand syndrome is not uncommon; however, there have only been a few reports on this condition. This study was undertaken to obtain a better understanding of the epidemiology of the two feet-one hand syndrome.
A retrospective chart review was conducted of all the patients seen in our practices over the past 15 years with the diagnosis of two feet-one hand syndrome.
A total of 80 patients with mycologically confirmed disease were identified (men, 72 (90%); women, 8 (10%); 77 (96%) Caucasian; 3 (4%) African-American; age (mean +/- standard error (SE)), 55.9 +/- 2.1 years). The mean age of the patients when the physician was first seen for the condition was 51.3 +/- 2.0 years. The mean ages when the symptoms first developed on the feet and hand were 37.1 +/- 2.4 years and 45.7 +/- 2.2 years, respectively. Tinea pedis was found to occur at an earlier age than tinea manuum (t(65) = 6.92, P
PubMed ID
9352405 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.