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595 records – page 1 of 60.

ABH secretor status, as judged by the Lewis phenotypes, in Norwegian survivors from meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220181
Source
APMIS. 1993 Oct;101(10):791-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
L. Kornstad
A L Heistøo
T E Michaelsen
G. Bjune
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
APMIS. 1993 Oct;101(10):791-4
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - blood
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Donors
Disease Susceptibility
Fucosyltransferases - genetics
Humans
Lewis Blood-Group System - blood
Meningococcal Infections - blood - physiopathology
Neisseria meningitidis - classification
Norway
Phenotype
Reference Values
Serotyping
Abstract
Survivors from meningococcal disease (serogroups B and C) and a control series (blood donors) were examined for their ability to secrete ABH blood group substance. The examination was done indirectly by determining their Lewis phenotypes. There was no significant difference in the secretor status between the two groups.
PubMed ID
8267956 View in PubMed
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Absence of the A1252G mutation in alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in a North American population suffering from dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209447
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1997 Feb;17(2):233-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
B M Gilfix
L. Briones
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Genetics, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1997 Feb;17(2):233-5
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - complications
Alleles
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Dementia, Vascular - epidemiology - genetics
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Quebec - epidemiology
alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin - deficiency - genetics
Abstract
Associations have been reported between polymorphisms in the gene for alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease. An A-to-G substitution at nucleotide position 1,252 of ACT that produces a methionine to valine substitution at codon 389 has been found previously in four of 32 individuals with cerebrovascular disease from a Japanese population. We genotyped 194 individuals [59 controls, 35 with non-AD-type dementia (primarily vascular) and 100 with Alzheimer's-type dementia] for this polymorphism and found none that carry this polymorphism. Therefore, the allelic association of the A1252G mutation of ACT with cerebrovascular disease may be confined to the Japanese population and is not generalizable to other populations.
PubMed ID
9040504 View in PubMed
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[A correlational analysis of dermatoglyphic indices in women with abortion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64194
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1998 Jan-Feb;32(1):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Bondarenko
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1998 Jan-Feb;32(1):116-20
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Comparative Study
Dermatoglyphics
Disease Susceptibility
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Ukraine
Abstract
Having made the correlative analysis of dermatoglyphic characteristics the dependence between distribution of finger and palm patterns and inclination to abortive delivery was established. The computer programme of analysis of dermatoglyphic characteristics gives an opportunity to determine the inclination of a certain person to abortive delivery.
PubMed ID
9695261 View in PubMed
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Adolescent dietary phytoestrogen intake and breast cancer risk (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166482
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Dec;17(10):1253-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Joanne Thanos
Michelle Cotterchio
Beatrice A Boucher
Nancy Kreiger
Lilian U Thompson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Dec;17(10):1253-61
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Breast Neoplasms - diet therapy - prevention & control
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Humans
Odds Ratio
Phytoestrogens - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
It has been suggested that dietary phytoestrogen intake during adolescence may reduce the risk of developing breast cancer. This population-based case-control study evaluated the association between adolescent dietary phytoestrogen intake and adult breast cancer risk among women in Ontario, Canada.
Pathology-confirmed, population-based breast cancer cases, aged 25-74 years, diagnosed between June 2002 and April 2003, were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Population-based controls were recruited, and matched to cases within 5-year age groups. Adolescent phytoestrogen intake was obtained using a brief food frequency questionnaire (n = 3,024 cases, n = 3,420 controls). Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Higher phytoestrogen intake (both isoflavones and lignans) during adolescence was associated with a reduced breast cancer risk, and a monotonic trend was observed from the lowest to the highest quartile (OR [Q2] = 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-1.04, OR[Q3] = 0.86, 95% CI 0.75-0.98, and OR[Q4] = 0.71, 95% CI 0.62-0.82, p-trend
PubMed ID
17111256 View in PubMed
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Adult glucose metabolism in extremely birthweight-discordant monozygotic twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120924
Source
Diabetologia. 2012 Dec;55(12):3204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
M. Frost
I. Petersen
K. Brixen
H. Beck-Nielsen
J J Holst
L. Christiansen
K. Højlund
K. Christensen
Author Affiliation
The Danish Twin Registry, Department of Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, JB Winsløvsvej 9, Odense C, Denmark. frostnielsen@yahoo.com
Source
Diabetologia. 2012 Dec;55(12):3204-12
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Birth weight
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility - blood - epidemiology
Female
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Insulin Resistance
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Low birthweight (BW) is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We compared glucose metabolism in adult BW-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins, thereby controlling for genetic factors and rearing environment.
Among 77,885 twins in the Danish Twin Registry, 155 of the most BW-discordant MZ twin pairs (median BW difference 0.5 kg) were assessed using a 2 h oral glucose tolerance test with sampling of plasma (p-)glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1. HOMA for beta cell function (HOMA-ß) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and also insulin sensitivity index (BIGTT-SI) and acute insulin response (BIGTT-AIR), were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed in those with: (1) double verification of BW difference; (2) difference in BW >0.5 kg; and (3) no overt metabolic disease (type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidaemia or thyroid disease).
No intra-pair differences in p-glucose, insulin, C-peptide, incretin hormones, HOMA-ß, HOMA-IR or BIGTT-SI were identified. p-Glucose at 120 min was higher in the twins with the highest BW without metabolic disease, and BIGTT-AIR was higher in those with the highest BW although not in pairs with a BW difference of >0.5 kg.
BW-discordant MZ twins provide no evidence for a detrimental effect of low BW on glucose metabolism in adulthood once genetic factors and rearing environment are controlled for.
PubMed ID
22955993 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences and the cardiovascular health of children: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105586
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2013;13:208
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Chelsea Pretty
Deborah D O'Leary
John Cairney
Terrance J Wade
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Brock University, St Catharines ON, Canada. twade@brocku.ca.
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2013;13:208
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Family Conflict
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - genetics
Income - statistics & numerical data
Life Change Events
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), such as abuse, household dysfunction, and neglect, have been shown to increase adults' risk of developing chronic conditions and risk factors for chronic conditions, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Much less work has investigated the effect of ACEs on children's physical health status that may lead to adult chronic health conditions. Therefore, the present study examined the relationship between ACEs and early childhood risk factors for adult cardiovascular disease.
1 234 grade six to eight students participated in school-based data collection, which included resting measures of blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Parents of these children completed an inventory of ACEs taken from the Childhood Trust Events Survey. Linear regression models were used to assess the relationship between experiencing more than 4 ACEs experienced, systolic BP, HR, BMI and WC. In additional analysis, ACEs were assessed ordinally in their relationship with systolic BP, HR, and BMI as well as clinical obesity and hypertension status.
After adjustment for family education, income, age, sex, physical activity, and parental history of hypertension, and WC for HR models, four or more ACEs had a significant effect on HR (b = 1.8 bpm, 95% CI (0.1-3.6)) BMI (b =1.1 kg/m2, 95% CI (0.5-1.8)), and WC (b = 3.6 cm, 95% CI (1.8-5.3)). A dose-response relationship between ACE accumulation and both BMI and WC was also found to be significant. Furthermore, accumulation of 4 or more ACEs was significantly associated with clinical obesity (95th percentile), after controlling for the aforementioned covariates.
In a community sample of grade six to eight children, accumulation of 4 or more ACEs significantly increased BMI, WC and resting HR. Therefore, risk factors related to reported associations between ACEs and cardiovascular outcomes among adults are identifiable in childhood suggesting earlier interventions to reduce CVD risk are required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24344611 View in PubMed
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Adverse events and problems in therapeutic hemapheresis. A report from the Swedish registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19348
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2001 Aug;25(1):33-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
R. Norda
O. Berséus
B. Stegmayr
Author Affiliation
Department of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohemotherapy, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden. rut.norda@orebroll.se
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2001 Aug;25(1):33-41
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - complications - therapy
Disease Susceptibility
Extracorporeal Circulation - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Flushing - epidemiology - etiology
Hematologic Diseases - complications - therapy
Humans
Hypotension - epidemiology - etiology
Immunosorbent Techniques
Incidence
Nausea - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - complications - therapy
Paresthesia - epidemiology - etiology
Plasma Exchange - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Plasmapheresis - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Urticaria - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Since 1996 adverse events (AE) in therapeutic apheresis (TA) have been more extensively registered in Sweden. This report analyzes the extent and relation of AEs to procedures and diagnoses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Reporting of TA performed in Sweden was centralized. A separate system for the registration of AE in TA was established and the data received were entered into a central database for registration and analyses. Fifteen of all 35 apheresis units reported both TA and AE during 1996-1999. These centers performed 75% of all TA procedures. Adverse events included medical symptoms, vascular access problems, technical and other problems. RESULTS: More than 14,000 procedures were registered during the observation period. No fatalities occurred. AEs occurred in 3.7% (1996), 4.6% (1997), 4.2% (1998) and 4.4% (1999) of procedures. Interventions during the adverse event were performed in about 65% of the events. Apheresis procedures were interrupted due to an adverse event in about 1%. Adverse events occurred in 5.6% of plasma exchanges, 1.9% of plasma modulations and 6.8% of cytapheresis procedures. Paresthesia was registered in 22% and hypotensive events in 20.5%. Other more frequent symptoms were urticaria (14.4%), shivering (7.4%) and nausea (7.4%). AEs were most frequent in patients with Goodpasture's syndrome (12.5%), TTP/HUS (10.5%) and GuillainBarré syndrome (11.0%). CONCLUSION: AEs are few, often mild and less common in plasma modulation than plasma exchange. AEs are more frequent during TA of patients with certain diagnoses such as TTP/HUS.
PubMed ID
11791760 View in PubMed
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Affective personality as cognitive-emotional presymptom profiles regulatory for self-reported health predispositions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92039
Source
Neurotox Res. 2008 Aug;14(1):21-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Archer T.
Adolfsson B.
Karlsson E.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Göteborg, Box 500, SE-430 50 Göteborg, Sweden. trevor.archer@psy.gu.se
Source
Neurotox Res. 2008 Aug;14(1):21-44
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cognition - physiology
Disease Susceptibility - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Emotions - physiology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Personality
Personality Inventory
Predictive value of tests
Self Concept
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Three studies that examined the links between affective personality, as constructed from responses to the Positive Affect (PA) and Negative Affect (NA) Scale (PANAS), and individuals' self-report of self-esteem, intrinsic motivation and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) depression in high school students and persons in working occupations are described. Self-report estimations of several other neuropsychiatric and psychosocial variables including, the Uppsala Sleep Inventory (USI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) test, Dispositional optimism, Locus of control, the Subjective Stress Experience test (SSE) and the Stress-Energy (SE) test, were also derived. Marked effects due to affective personality type upon somatic and psychological stress, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, internal and external locus of control, optimism, stress and energy, intrinsic motivation, external regulation, identified regulation, major sleep problems, problems falling asleep, and psychophysiological problems were observed; levels of self-esteem, self-motivation and BDI-depression all produced substantial effects on health and well-being. Regression analyses indicated PA was predicted by dispositional optimism (thrice), energy (thrice), and intrinsic motivation, and counter predicted by depression (twice) and stress (twice); and NA by anxiety (twice), stress (twice), psychological stress, identified regulation, BDI depression and psychophysiological problems, and counter predicted by internal locus of control and self-esteem. BDI-depression was predicted by negative affect, major sleep problems and psychophysiological problems (Study III), self-esteem by dispositional optimism and energy, and counter predicted by anxiety, depression and stress (Study I), and intrinsic motivation by dispositional optimism, energy, PA and self-esteem (Study II). These convergent findings are interpreted from a perspective of the cognitive-emotional expressions underlying behavioural or presymptomatic profiles presenting predispositions for health or ill health.
PubMed ID
18790723 View in PubMed
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Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study: multidisciplinary applied phenomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78517
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2007
Author
Harris Tamara B
Launer Lenore J
Eiriksdottir Gudny
Kjartansson Olafur
Jonsson Palmi V
Sigurdsson Gunnar
Thorgeirsson Gudmundur
Aspelund Thor
Garcia Melissa E
Cotch Mary Frances
Hoffman Howard J
Gudnason Vilmundur
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD 20892-9205, USA. Harris99@mail.nih.gov
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-87
Date
May-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - genetics - pathology
Body Composition
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Chronic Disease
Dementia - epidemiology - genetics
Disease Susceptibility
Environment
Female
Genotype
Geriatrics
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - genetics
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
In anticipation of the sequencing of the human genome and description of the human proteome, the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (AGES-Reykjavik) was initiated in 2002. AGES-Reykjavik was designed to examine risk factors, including genetic susceptibility and gene/environment interaction, in relation to disease and disability in old age. The study is multidisciplinary, providing detailed phenotypes related to the cardiovascular, neurocognitive (including sensory), and musculoskeletal systems, and to body composition and metabolic regulation. Relevant quantitative traits, subclinical indicators of disease, and medical diagnoses are identified by using biomarkers, imaging, and other physiologic indicators. The AGES-Reykjavik sample is drawn from an established population-based cohort, the Reykjavik Study. This cohort of men and women born between 1907 and 1935 has been followed in Iceland since 1967 by the Icelandic Heart Association. The AGES-Reykjavik cohort, with cardiovascular risk factor assessments earlier in life and detailed late-life phenotypes of quantitative traits, will create a comprehensive study of aging nested in a relatively genetically homogeneous older population. This approach should facilitate identification of genetic factors that contribute to healthy aging as well as the chronic conditions common in old age.
PubMed ID
17351290 View in PubMed
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595 records – page 1 of 60.