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122 records – page 1 of 13.

The 1988 and 2002 phocine distemper virus epidemics in European harbour seals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6586
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Jan 30;68(2):115-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2006
Author
Tero Härkönen
Rune Dietz
Peter Reijnders
Jonas Teilmann
Karin Harding
Ailsa Hall
Sophie Brasseur
Ursula Siebert
Simon J Goodman
Paul D Jepson
Thomas Dau Rasmussen
Paul Thompson
Author Affiliation
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden. tero.harkonen@swipnet.se
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Jan 30;68(2):115-30
Date
Jan-30-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Carnivora
Comparative Study
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Disease Reservoirs - veterinary
Disease Vectors
Distemper - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Distemper Virus, Phocine
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Male
Morbillivirus - classification - pathogenicity
Phoca - virology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
We present new and revised data for the phocine distemper virus (PDV) epidemics that resulted in the deaths of more than 23 000 harbour seals Phoca vitulina in 1988 and 30,000 in 2002. On both occasions the epidemics started at the Danish island of Anholt in central Kattegat, and subsequently spread to adjacent colonies in a stepwise fashion. However, this pattern was not maintained throughout the epidemics and new centres of infection appeared far from infected populations on some occasions: in 1988 early positive cases were observed in the Irish Sea, and in 2002 the epidemic appeared in the Dutch Wadden Sea, 6 wk after the initiation of the outbreak at Anholt Island. Since the harbour seal is a rather sedentary species, such 'jumps' in the spread among colonies suggest that another vector species could have been involved. We discussed the role of sympatric species as disease vectors, and suggested that grey seal populations could act as reservoirs for PDV if infection rates in sympatric species are lower than in harbour seals. Alternatively, grey seals could act as subclinical infected carriers of the virus between Arctic and North Sea seal populations. Mixed colonies of grey and harbour seal colonies are found at all locations where the jumps occurred. It seems likely that grey seals, which show long-distance movements, contributed to the spread among regions. The harbour seal populations along the Norwegian coast and in the Baltic escaped both epidemics, which could be due either to genetic differences among harbour seal populations or to immunity. Catastrophic events such as repeated epidemics should be accounted for in future models and management strategies of wildlife populations.
PubMed ID
16532603 View in PubMed
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Abscess disease, caseous lymphadenitis, and pulmonary adenomatosis in imported sheep.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20491
Source
J Vet Med B Infect Dis Vet Public Health. 2000 Feb;47(1):55-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
K. Møller
J S Agerholm
P. Ahrens
N E Jensen
T K Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Danish Veterinary Laboratory, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Vet Med B Infect Dis Vet Public Health. 2000 Feb;47(1):55-62
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abscess - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Adenomatosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Animals
DNA Primers - chemistry
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - isolation & purification
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - isolation & purification
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Lymph Nodes - microbiology - pathology
Lymphadenitis - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Staphylococcus aureus - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The occurrence of abscess disease, caseous lymphadenitis, and pulmonary adenomatosis in sheep in Denmark is reported for the first time. Subcutaneous abscesses were observed in imported 4- to 5-month-old lambs of the Lacaune breed 10 days after arrival in Denmark. Abscesses were mostly located in the head, neck and shoulder regions close to the regional lymph nodes. Bacteriological examinations revealed growth of Staphylococcus aureus ssp. anaerobius in all animals with subcutaneously located abscesses containing a viscous white-yellow odourless mass. In addition, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis was isolated from abscesses in one animal and lesions consistent with pulmonary adenomatosis were found in four animals.
PubMed ID
10780173 View in PubMed
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Acute necrotising hepatitis in Danish farmed hares.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56905
Source
Vet Rec. 1989 Nov 4;125(19):486-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1989

Acute selenium poisoning from selenium-containing iron supplement in suckling pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75515
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 2003 Feb;45(1):31-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Tore Sivertsen
Anne Jørgensen
Aksel Bernhoft
Gunnar A Sylliaas
Hilde Magda Juul
Børge Baustad
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep, 0033 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 2003 Feb;45(1):31-2
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Dietary Supplements
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Iron - administration & dosage
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - veterinary
Selenium - blood - poisoning
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We report an outbreak of acute selenium poisoning among suckling pigs; 92 piglets were found dead or moribund without preceding symptoms. Necropsy revealed acute congestion of liver and small intestine. The source was a powdered iron supplement contaminated by sodium selenite.
PubMed ID
12583694 View in PubMed
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An enzootic outbreak of acute disease associated with pathogenic E. coli in Adler monkey colony.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276830
Source
J Med Primatol. 2015 Dec;44(6):355-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Boris A Lapin
Lelita A Yakovleva
Eteri K Dzhikidze
Tatiana E Gvozdik
Aslan A Agumava
Zinaida K Stasilevich
Irina G Danilova
Source
J Med Primatol. 2015 Dec;44(6):355-63
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Haplorhini
Housing, Animal
Monkey Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
In spring 2009 in Adler colony of the Institute of Medical Primatology, a large enzootic outbreak of acute intestine infection associated with pathogenic E. coli occurred and caused 5% mortality of population (209 animals).
The epidemiological analysis, bacteriological investigation, postmortem examination, histological analysis, and PCR were used to identify the infectious agent.
Marked hemorrhagic diathesis, lethargy, dehydration, diarrhea with blood, wasting, and sometimes dystrophic changes in articular cartilages were noted. Morphologically, hemorrhagic enterocolitis and massive hemorrhages were found. PCR investigation of bacteriologically isolated E. coli characterized it as enteropathogenic and enteroinvasive E. coli.
The outbreak in Adler colony slightly differed from similar outbreak in Florida in 2014 by more marked hemorrhagic diathesis and articular changes in some monkeys caused by polyavitaminosis developed in the course of infection. Sensitive to infection were M. mulatta, M. fascicularis, Cercopithecus aethiops, P. hamadryas and anubis, and Cebus capucinus.
PubMed ID
26215538 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of sylvatic rabies in Finland--descriptive epidemiology and results of oral vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5863
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1992;33(1):43-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. Nyberg
K. Kulonen
E. Neuvonen
C. Ek-Kommonen
M. Nuorgam
B. Westerling
Author Affiliation
Field Department, National Veterinary Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1992;33(1):43-57
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Carnivora
Cats
Cattle
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Dogs
Finland - epidemiology
Foxes
Rabies - epidemiology - prevention & control - veterinary
Rabies Vaccines
Vaccination - veterinary
Abstract
When rabies reappeared in Finland in April 1988, the country had been rabies free since 1959. Soon a picture of sylvatic rabies become evident, its main vector and victim being the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides). Between 8 April 1988 and 16 February 1989, 66 virologically verified cases were recorded (48 raccoon dogs, 12 red foxes, 2 badgers, 2 cats, 1 dog and 1 dairy bull) in an area estimated at 1700 km2 in south-eastern Finland. The greatest distance between recorded cases was 67 km. A positive reaction with monoclonal antibody p-41 indicated that the virus was an arctic-type strain. A field trial on oral immunization of small predators was initiated in September 1988 using Tübingen fox baits according to the Bavarian model of bait distribution. Each bait contained 5*10(7) TCID50/ml modified live rabies virus (SAD-B19). The 6 months' surveillance indicate a seroconversion rate of 72% (N = 126) in the raccoon dog population, 67% (N = 56) in the red foxes and 13% (N = 16) in the badgers, when titers greater than or equal to 1.0 IU/ml are considered seropositive. In the whole follow-up period, no statistically significant difference could be detected between the raccoon dogs and red foxes in the rate of seroconversion or in the uptake of tetracycline from the baits. Notably high antibody levels were recorded in both raccoon dogs and red foxes within 4-5 months after vaccination. Of the seropositive animals, the proportion of animals with titers 3.0 IU/ml or greater was higher in raccoon dogs (73%) than in red foxes (51%) (x2 = 5.29, p less than 0.05). The trial shows that raccoon dogs can be immunized against rabies in the field with vaccine baits originally developed for controlling sylvatic rabies in foxes.
PubMed ID
1598857 View in PubMed
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An ethicist's commentary on bad becoming normal in agriculture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142489
Source
Can Vet J. 2010 Apr;51(4):352-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010

An evaluation of immunofluorescence and PCR methods for detection of rabies in archival Carnoy-fixed, paraffin-embedded brain tissue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202088
Source
Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1999 Apr;46(3):151-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
K. Kulonen
M. Fekadu
S. Whitfield
C K Warner
Author Affiliation
Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1999 Apr;46(3):151-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain - pathology - virology
Cats
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Dogs
Finland - epidemiology
Foxes
Humans
Mice
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - veterinary
Rabies - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Rabies virus - isolation & purification
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Direct immunofluorescence and PCR detection methods were compared for sensitivity in evaluating the rabies status of archival specimens of Carnoy-fixed, paraffin-embedded brain tissue. The material consisted of 23 samples obtained during a rabies outbreak in Finland in 1988, and one sample isolated from a bat researcher who died of rabies in Finland in 1985. These results were compared with the original diagnoses performed on the fresh tissues. The immunofluorescence assay detected 100% (12/12) of the rabies-positive archival cases. A PCR assay designed to detect a 139-bp target near the 5' end of the rabies nucleoprotein gene also detected 100% (12/12) of the samples identified as positive in the fresh tissue specimens. A PCR assay designed to detect a 304-bp target spanning the 139-bp target of the first assay detected only 67% (8/12) of the original cases. No false positives were recorded. Both immunofluorescence detection of antigen and PCR detection of a short region of the nucleoprotein gene are useful in determining the rabies status of fixed, paraffin embedded (archival) material.
Notes
Erratum In: Zentralbl Veterinarmed [B] 1999 Sep;46(7):503
PubMed ID
10337236 View in PubMed
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An investigation into human pandemic influenza virus (H1N1) 2009 on an Alberta swine farm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145722
Source
Can Vet J. 2009 Nov;50(11):1153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Krista J Howden
Egan J Brockhoff
Francois D Caya
Laura J McLeod
Martin Lavoie
Joan D Ing
Janet M Bystrom
Soren Alexandersen
John M Pasick
Yohannes Berhane
Margaret E Morrison
Julia M Keenliside
Sonja Laurendeau
Elizabeth B Rohonczy
Author Affiliation
Terrestrial Animal Health Division, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Ontario. Krista.Howden@inspection.gc.ca
Source
Can Vet J. 2009 Nov;50(11):1153-61
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Animals
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Euthanasia, Animal
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Orthomyxoviridae Infections - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary - virology
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Zoonoses
Abstract
On May 2, 2009 the Canadian Food Inspection Agency notified the World Organization for Animal Health that an emerging novel influenza A virus (pandemic H1N1 2009) had been confirmed on a swine farm in Alberta. Over a 4-week period pigs in this farrow-to-finish operation were clinically affected by respiratory disease consistent with an influenza A virus infection and the presence of active viral infection was confirmed in all production areas by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Despite clinical recovery of animals, there was reluctance by purchasers to receive animals from this operation due to concerns about the effect on both domestic and international markets. The owner decided to depopulate the entire herd due to impending welfare issues associated with overcrowding and economic concerns resulting from the inability to market these animals. Carcasses were rendered or composted and did not enter the human food or animal feed chain. The source of virus in this herd was determined to be an infected human. Zoonotic transmission to 2 individuals responding to the outbreak was suspected and recommendations to prevent occupational exposure are discussed.
Notes
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Apr 15;44(8):1084-817366454
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Nov;38(11):4096-10111060074
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 Dec;13(12):1871-818258038
Cites: Vet Res. 2007 Mar-Apr;38(2):243-6017257572
Cites: Arch Virol. 2000;145(7):1399-41910963345
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Sep;40(9):3256-6012202562
Comment In: Can Vet J. 2010 Dec;51(12):1315-821358923
PubMed ID
20119537 View in PubMed
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122 records – page 1 of 13.