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[Acute diseases and trauma of thorax and abdomen in patients with hemocontact viral infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138580
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2010;(9):24-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
M A Godkov
Sh N Danielian
M M Abakumov
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2010;(9):24-9
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Communicable disease control
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Comorbidity
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology - surgery
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Disease Transmission, Infectious - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Humans
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Surgery Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Thoracic Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Abstract
Screening of hemocontact viral infections (HVI) (HIV, hepatitis B and C) was conducted among patients of the emergency thoraco-abdominal surgery unit. During the 8 years of the study the HVI detection had increased on 57.4%. Gender analysis showed greater HVI prevalence among men. Medico-social criteria of HVI risk-groups among patients of the emergency thoraco-abdominal surgery unit were stated.
PubMed ID
21164418 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of amantadine and oseltamivir used during respiratory outbreaks in a center for developmentally disabled adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177196
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;25(11):955-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Allison J McGeer
Wayne Lee
Mark Loeb
Andrew E Simor
Margaret McArthur
Karen Green
Jonathan Hayfron Benjamin
Charles Gardner
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;25(11):955-61
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Amantadine - adverse effects
Antiviral Agents - adverse effects
Child
Comorbidity
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - chemically induced
Humans
Incidence
Infection Control - methods - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced
Ontario - epidemiology
Oseltamivir
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Antiviral prophylaxis is recommended for the control of institutional influenza A outbreaks. In long-term-care institutions other than nursing homes, neither the seriousness of influenza nor the risks and benefits of antiviral prophylaxis is clearly understood. We studied the severity of illness due to influenza among adults residing in a center for the developmentally disabled and assessed adverse reactions to amantadine and oseltamivir prophylaxis.
Data were collected from the charts of consenting residents. Complications of upper respiratory tract illness were recorded. Potential adverse events were documented during amantadine and oseltamivir therapy, and during a baseline period with neither medication.
The median age of the 287 participants was 46.4 years. Only 15 (5%) were older than 65 years, and 69 (24%) had chronic underlying medical illness placing them at high risk for influenza. Of the 122 residents with an upper respiratory tract infection, 16 (13%) developed pneumonia, 12 (9.8%) were hospitalized, and 5 (4%) died. Twenty-eight (25%) of 112 residents had an adverse neurologic event while receiving amantadine prophylaxis, compared with 3 (2.7%) receiving no antiviral medication and 5 (4.5%) receiving oseltamivir (P
PubMed ID
15566030 View in PubMed
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Age, influenza pandemics and disease dynamics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144743
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2010 Nov;138(11):1542-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
A L Greer
A. Tuite
D N Fisman
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2010 Nov;138(11):1542-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
The world is currently confronting the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century [caused by a novel pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus]. Earlier pandemics have been characterized by age distributions that are distinct from those observed with seasonal influenza epidemics, with higher attack rates (and correspondingly increased proportionate or relative mortality) in younger individuals. While the genesis of protection against infection in older individuals during a pandemic is uncertain, differential vulnerability to infection by age has important implications for disease dynamics and control, and for choice of optimal vaccination strategies. Age-related vulnerability to infection may explain differences between school- and community-derived estimates of the reproductive number (R) for a newly emerged pandemic strain, and may also help explain the failure of a newly emerged influenza A (H1N1) virus strain to cause a pandemic in 1977. Age-related factors may also help explain variability in attack rates, and the size and impact of influenza epidemics across jurisdictions and between populations. In Canada, such effects have been observed in the apparently increased severity of outbreaks on Indigenous peoples' reserves. The implications of these patterns for vaccine allocation necessitate targeted research to understand age-related vulnerabilities early in an influenza pandemic.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiol Infect. 2011 Sep;139(9):1440-1; author reply 1441-221087543
PubMed ID
20307340 View in PubMed
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The AIDS epidemic in the city of Copenhagen, Denmark: potential years of life lost and impact on life expectancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7136
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(3):222-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jeanne D Johansen
Else Smith
Knud Juel
Nils Rosdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(3):222-7
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Adult
Cause of Death
Cities - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
AIMS: This study seeks to describe the impact of AIDS on the city of Copenhagen by estimating potential years of life lost (PYLL) before the age of 65 years and to estimate the impact of AIDS deaths on life expectancy for males and females. METHODS: All AIDS cases reported to the national AIDS surveillance register for residents in the city of Copenhagen in the period 1983-98 were included. For comparative purposes data were obtained on six other causes of death: accidents, suicide, lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease, testicular cancer, and breast cancer. RESULTS: Overall, deaths from AIDS accounted for 8% of all PYLL in men and showed an increasing tendency from 1983 to 1991, when it became the leading cause of PYLL. AIDS had most impact in men in the age group 25-44 years and accounted for 29% of all PYLL in this group at the peak in 1993, decreasing significantly after the introduction of anti-retroviral treatments to 5% of PYLL in 1998. Other leading causes of PYLL, accidents and suicide, also showed a decreasing tendency over the years, but of a much smaller magnitude than AIDS. The impact of AIDS in women was more modest. In the entire study period suicide, accidents, and breast cancer were the leading causes of PYLL in women. It was shown that AIDS deaths at the top of the epidemic in 1991-95 were responsible for a loss of 0.76 years in life expectancy for men and 0.08 years for women. CONCLUSIONS: AIDS has had a considerable impact on potential years of life lost. A significant decline in AIDS deaths has been seen since 1995 with an effect on life expectancy for men in the city of Copenhagen.
PubMed ID
16040464 View in PubMed
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Analysis of simultaneous space-time clusters of Campylobacter spp. in humans and in broiler flocks using a multiple dataset approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140580
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Malin E Jonsson
Berit Tafjord Heier
Madelaine Norström
Merete Hofshagen
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Department for Health Surveillance, POB 750 Sentrum, 0106 Oslo, Norway. malin.jonsson@vetinst.no
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:48
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Chickens
Cluster analysis
Data Collection - methods
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data - veterinary
Disease Reservoirs - microbiology - veterinary
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Incidence
Meat - microbiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Monte Carlo Method
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Poultry Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Registries
Seasons
Time Factors
Zoonoses
Abstract
Campylobacteriosis is the most frequently reported zoonosis in the EU and the epidemiology of sporadic campylobacteriosis, especially the routes of transmission, is to a great extent unclear. Poultry easily become colonised with Campylobacter spp., being symptom-less intestinal carriers. Earlier it was estimated that internationally between 50% and 80% of the cases could be attributed to chicken as a reservoir. In a Norwegian surveillance programme all broiler flocks under 50 days of age were tested for Campylobacter spp. The aim of the current study was to identify simultaneous local space-time clusters each year from 2002 to 2007 for human cases of campylobacteriosis and for broiler flocks testing positive for Campylobacter spp. using a multivariate spatial scan statistic method. A cluster occurring simultaneously in humans and broilers could indicate the presence of common factors associated with the dissemination of Campylobacter spp. for both humans and broilers.
Local space-time clusters of humans and broilers positive for Campylobacter spp. occurring simultaneously were identified in all investigated years. All clusters but one were identified from May to August. Some municipalities were included in clusters all years.
The simultaneous occurrence of clusters of humans and broilers positive for Campylobacter spp. combined with the knowledge that poultry meat has a nation-wide distribution indicates that campylobacteriosis cases might also be caused by other risk factors than consumption and handling of poultry meat.Broiler farms that are positive could contaminate the environment with further spread to new broiler farms or to humans living in the area and local environmental factors, such as climate, might influence the spread of Campylobacter spp. in an area. Further studies to clarify the role of such factors are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20860801 View in PubMed
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[An information subsystem for the epidemiological surveillance of hepatitis B]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56878
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Jul;(7):46-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1991
Author
A F Frolov
M Ia Orgel'
A L Gural'
N V Tychinskii
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Jul;(7):46-8
Date
Jul-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carrier State - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Hemagglutination Tests
Hepatitis B - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - blood
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Information Systems
Population Surveillance - methods
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The improvement of prophylaxis and the decrease of morbidity rate in hepatitis B are possible on the basis of the introduction of the information subsystem of epidemiological surveillance into practical health service, including health service in rural areas. The necessity of ensuring the specificity of highly sensitive immunodiagnostic techniques by using the combination of these techniques and competitive radioimmunoassay, as well as increasing their availability by the cooperation of laboratories at the district and regional levels, is emphasized.
PubMed ID
1950263 View in PubMed
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An outbreak due to multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a burn unit: risk factors for acquisition and management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190091
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 May;23(5):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Andrew E Simor
Mark Lee
Mary Vearncombe
Linda Jones-Paul
Clare Barry
Manuel Gomez
Joel S Fish
Robert C Cartotto
Robert Palmer
Marie Louie
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 May;23(5):261-7
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acinetobacter Infections - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Acinetobacter baumannii
Blood Component Transfusion - adverse effects
Burn Units
Burns - complications
Case-Control Studies
Cross Infection - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Hand Disinfection - standards
Hospitals, Teaching
Housekeeping, Hospital - standards
Humans
Hydrotherapy - adverse effects
Infection Control - methods
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
To describe the investigation and management of an outbreak due to multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii and to determine risk factors for acquisition of the organism.
A 14-bed regional burn unit in a Canadian tertiary-care teaching hospital.
Case-control study with multivariate analysis of potential risk factors using logistic regression analysis. Surveillance cultures were obtained from the hospital environment, from noninfected patients, and from healthcare providers.
A total of 31 (13%) of 247 patients with acute burn injuries acquired multiresistant A. baumannii between December 1998 and March 2000; 18 (58%) of the patients were infected. The organism was recovered from the hospital environment and the hands of healthcare providers. Significant risk factors for acquisition of multiresistant A. baumannii were receipt of blood products (odds ratio [OR], 10.8; 95% confidence interval [CI95], 3.4 to 34.4; P
PubMed ID
12026151 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of giardiasis among children in family day nurseries]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36778
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Mar 4;89(10):764-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-1992

121 records – page 1 of 13.