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209 records – page 1 of 21.

[15 cases of epidemic hepatitis. Can infection take place through community laundries?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57194
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1968 May 23;130(21):911-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-1968
Author
F. Lovschall
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1968 May 23;130(21):911-2
Date
May-23-1968
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable disease control
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks - history
Germany
Hepatitis A - epidemiology
Laundering
PubMed ID
5699684 View in PubMed
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[1880-2005--from poverty diseases to the affluent society's diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58100
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jan 5;126(1):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-5-2006

1951 influenza epidemic, England and Wales, Canada, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169257
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Cécile Viboud
Theresa Tam
Douglas Fleming
Mark A Miller
Lone Simonsen
Author Affiliation
National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. viboudc@mail.nih.gov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - history
England - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Middle Aged
Seasons
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Influenza poses a continuing public health threat in epidemic and pandemic seasons. The 1951 influenza epidemic (A/H1N1) caused an unusually high death toll in England; in particular, weekly deaths in Liverpool even surpassed those of the 1918 pandemic. We further quantified the death rate of the 1951 epidemic in 3 countries. In England and Canada, we found that excess death rates from pneumonia and influenza and all causes were substantially higher for the 1951 epidemic than for the 1957 and 1968 pandemics (by > or =50%). The age-specific pattern of deaths in 1951 was consistent with that of other interpandemic seasons; no age shift to younger age groups, reminiscent of pandemics, occurred in the death rate. In contrast to England and Canada, the 1951 epidemic was not particularly severe in the United States. Why this epidemic was so severe in some areas but not others remains unknown and highlights major gaps in our understanding of interpandemic influenza.
Notes
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Cites: Br Med J. 1951 Oct 20;2(4737):921-714869766
PubMed ID
16704816 View in PubMed
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Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Feb 19;101(8):715
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2004

[Absalon Pederssøn's report on the plague in Bergen during 1565-1567].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229664
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Dec 10;109(34-36):3574-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1989
Author
P. Oeding
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Dec 10;109(34-36):3574-7
Date
Dec-10-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks - history
History, 16th Century
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Plague - epidemiology - history
Abstract
The plague in Bergen 1565-67 was reported by Absalon Pederssøn, a citizen of Bergen, in his diary. The diary describes the onset of the epidemic and reports the deaths from day to day. The plague was brought to Bergen on about 10th August 1565 by a ship from Danzig. Altogether 1,500 people died of bubonic plague in Bergen, i.e. 21-25% of its population. The peaks of the epidemic occurred during the autumn months of 1565 and 1566. In both years the city was almost free from plague from February to July. During the first phase the infection must have been transmitted by rat fleas, but human fleas were the carrier during the cold autumn months. The recurrence in August 1566 and 1567 must have been due to the establishment of a plague reservoir among the rats in the grain stores.
PubMed ID
2694431 View in PubMed
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[Acute morbidity and risk factors in Telemark 1870-1900].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183964
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2086-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-2003
Author
Asbjørn Storesund
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1130 Blindern, 0318 Oslo. asbjorn.storesund@hit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2086-90
Date
Aug-14-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - history - mortality - transmission
Disease Outbreaks - history
Food Habits
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - history - mortality
Health status
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Norway - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - history - mortality
Risk factors
Sanitation - history
Abstract
In spite of methodological problems it has been concluded that Norwegian health statistics on acute morbidity in the late 19th century reflect genuine nation-wide health differences, a fact which calls for studies on living conditions in the areas concerned.
Data on morbidity have been extracted from the annual medical reports from seven health districts in Telemark between 1870 and 1900. The incidence of widespread contagious diseases in two selected groups is calculated.
Illness increased in Skien health district throughout the period, while in Kragerø it declined from about 1885. The occurrence of acute gastrointestinal infections was higher in Skien and Kragerø than in the five rural districts. Remotely located rural districts had fewer outbreaks of epidemic diseases than the more central districts.
High occurrence of acute infections appears to have been related to extensive migration and a high level of through traffic. High population density combined with poor sanitary conditions seems to be a main cause of acute gastrointestinal infections. No obvious connections were found between health status and standards of general hygiene, diet and economic boom periods. It has not been possible to document any evident effects of public health work an acute morbidity, a few diseases of minor importance disregarded.
PubMed ID
12934143 View in PubMed
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209 records – page 1 of 21.