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293 records – page 1 of 30.

Absenteeism among hospital staff during an influenza epidemic: implications for immunoprophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240175
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Sep 1;131(5):449-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1984
Author
G W Hammond
M. Cheang
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Sep 1;131(5):449-52
Date
Sep-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Canada
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Personnel, Hospital
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The 1980-81 epidemic of influenza A/Bangkok 79 was responsible for increased absenteeism (1.7 times the rate for the corresponding period of the subsequent nonepidemic year) among selected hospital staff in Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre. Retrospective study of employment records for 25 of the centre's largest departments showed excess sick-leave costs of about $24 500 during the 2-week period of peak absenteeism that included the epidemic. Although the centre was sampling prospectively for the virus the first positive results became available too late for chemoprophylactic measures to have been effective. The greater increase in absenteeism among nursing staff caring for patients with chronic respiratory disease and nurses working on general medical or pediatric acute infection/isolation wards suggested that these groups be targeted for influenza vaccination in hospitals.
Notes
Cites: South Med J. 1977 Aug;70(8):1023-4887968
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PubMed ID
6467117 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acute epidemic myositis in children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246587
Source
Union Med Can. 1979 Dec;108(12):1472-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1979

[Acute gastroenteritis. An epidemic related to contaminated drinking water].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234442
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Nov 30;149(49):3360-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1987

Age-distribution of meningococcal disease as predictor of epidemics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242738
Source
Lancet. 1982 Nov 6;2(8306):1039-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-6-1982

Analysis of a measles epidemic; possible role of vaccine failures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251733
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Nov 22;113(10):941-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-1975
Author
W E Rawls
M L Rawls
M A Chernesky
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Nov 22;113(10):941-4
Date
Nov-22-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Male
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine
Ontario
Time Factors
Vaccines, Attenuated
Abstract
A measles epidemic occurred in the Greensville (Ont.) Unit schools during January and February 1975. There were 47 cases of measles in 403 students: 26 (55%) of the children had a history of being vaccinated and 18 (38%) had not been vaccinated. Among children known to have been vaccinated at less than 1 year of age 7 of 13 contracted measles, while among the 48 children who had not been vaccinated 18 contracted measles. The attack rate among vaccinees increased with increasing time since vaccination. The observations of this study as well as those of similar studies suggest that vaccine failures contributed to the genesis of the epidemic. It is recommended that all children initially vaccinated at less than 1 year of age should be revaccinated with live attenuated measles virus vaccine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1192310 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of hospital infection surveillance data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240344
Source
Infect Control. 1984 Jul;5(7):332-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1984
Author
D. Birnbaum
Source
Infect Control. 1984 Jul;5(7):332-8
Date
Jul-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Hospitals, General
Humans
Probability
Abstract
How often infection rates should be calculated and how large a change is required for "significance" are pertinent questions in nosocomial infection surveillance programs. A method is presented which establishes outbreak threshold infection frequencies. Comparison is direct and immediate: computation of rates or use of electronic data processing is not required. We have validated this method, using computer systems, by comparing the distributions of mean weekly incidence and prevalence statistics for each ward by nosocomial infection site in an acute care general hospital against both our theoretical outbreak threshold limits and the distribution of proven infection outbreaks. Sensitive and specific distinction between random variation or sporadic cross-infection and true persisting outbreaks requiring intervention is obtained. This approach provides a simple and timely alternative to intuitive after-the-fact interpretation of infection patterns which is applicable to infection surveillance and cost-effective infection control in hospitals of all sizes.
PubMed ID
6564085 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of Sonne dysentery in Leningrad performed taking into account the results of the enzymatic typing of the causative agents according to 1973-1975 data].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249215
Source
Tr Inst Im Pastera. 1978;50:11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978

293 records – page 1 of 30.