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Anonymous reporting of HIV infection: an evaluation of the HIV/AIDS surveillance system in Norway 1983-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7404
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(5):479-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P. Aavitsland
O. Nilsen
A. Lystad
Author Affiliation
Section for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. preben.aavitsland@folkehelsa.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(5):479-89
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Confidentiality
Data Collection - methods
Disease Notification - methods
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Program Evaluation
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Several European countries are considering implementing surveillance systems for HIV infection, but questions remain regarding patient confidentiality. The population-based HIV/AIDS surveillance system in Norway integrates anonymous HIV case reports from laboratories and clinicians and named AIDS case reports. This evaluation includes a description of the system, evidence of system attributes, estimation of resources for system operations, and documentation of the system's usefulness. HIV case reports provide a far better picture of the epidemic than AIDS reports. The median delay between positive HIV test and reporting was 30 days (interquartile range 18-49 days). Completeness of demographic and epidemiologic information in the surveillance database ranges from 60 to 100%. Information on pre-AIDS mortality and emigration is incomplete. The system cost euro 25,200 in 1999. Results are published every week and used for planning of health care and prevention. We conclude that the Norwegian surveillance system with anonymous reporting of HIV cases is simple, inexpensive and flexible, and capable of providing a representative and timely overview that guides prevention. The system fulfils its objectives while respecting confidentiality and adhering to ethical principles. A similar system may be considered in other countries.
PubMed ID
11855582 View in PubMed
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A Canadian hospital-based HIV/hepatitis C look-back notification program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207911
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Jul 15;157(2):149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1997
Author
N. Heddle
J G Kelton
F. Smaill
K. Foss
J. Everson
C. Janzen
C. Walker
M. Jones
D. Hammons
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. heddle@ihis.cmh.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Jul 15;157(2):149-54
Date
Jul-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Disease Notification - methods
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Hepatitis C - prevention & control
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant
Mass Screening
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Abstract
To describe the process used to notify pediatric patients who received transfusions of blood or blood products at our institution before donor blood was routinely screened for antibodies to HIV (1985) and hepatitis C virus (1990), and to evaluate the effectiveness of the notification program.
Patients who had received transfusions were identified through the hospital's medical records and the records from the Transfusion Medicine Laboratory. Patients were contacted by registered mail to provide notification of transfusion. A questionnaire was included with the notification to obtain information about the patient's awareness of the transfusion and whether he or she had undergone or planned to undergo testing for HIV and hepatitis C virus.
Tertiary care university-affiliated teaching hospital in Hamilton, Ont.
Patients 16 years of age or younger who had received blood products between February 1978 and November 1985. Patients who had received only albumin or immune serum globulin were not included as these products were not associated with viral transmission in Canada.
Notification letters were sent to 1546 patients. Of these letters 522 (33.8%) were returned undelivered. Of the 1024 patients contacted 493 (48.1%) responded to the questionnaire, of whom 157 (31.8%) were not aware of their transfusion. A total of 130 (26.4%) of the respondents had already undergone testing for HIV, and 342 (69.4%) indicated that they would undergo such testing as a result of the notification. In contrast, only 30 (6.3%) of 474 respondents had undergone testing for hepatitis C virus, but 425 (89.7%) indicated that they would undergo such testing. Overall, the patients' response to the notification was neutral or positive; however, a number of patients expressed dissatisfaction and anxiety.
The high proportion of patients who were unaware that they had undergone transfusion and who decided to undergo testing for HIV and hepatitis C virus as a result of notification supports the use of notification programs such as this one.
Notes
Cites: Gastroenterology. 1988 Aug;95(2):464-93134269
Cites: Pediatrics. 1995 May;95(5):717-217724310
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995 Jun;149(6):680-57767426
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Aug 19;260(7):922-33398190
Comment In: CMAJ. 1997 Jul 15;157(2):155-79238144
PubMed ID
9238143 View in PubMed
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[Chlamydia infection among Swedish women. Contact tracing and reporting routines must be improved].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154067
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Oct 29-Nov 4;105(44):3116-20
Publication Type
Article

The Chlamydia surveillance system in Sweden delivers relevant and accurate data: results from the system evaluation, 1997-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132646
Source
Euro Surveill. 2011;16(27)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
M. Riera-Montes
I. Velicko
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna. Margarita.Riera@gmx.com
Source
Euro Surveill. 2011;16(27)
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis
Disease Notification - methods - standards
Guidelines as Topic
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Population Surveillance - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Erratum In: Euro Surveill. 2011;16(28). pii: 19919
PubMed ID
21794217 View in PubMed
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The Danish Microbiology Database (MiBa) 2010 to 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105249
Source
Euro Surveill. 2014;19(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
M. Voldstedlund
M. Haarh
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2014;19(1)
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Disease Notification - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Microbiology
Population Surveillance
Abstract
The Danish Microbiology Database (MiBa) is a national database that receives copies of reports from all Danish departments of clinical microbiology. The database was launched in order to provide healthcare personnel with nationwide access to microbiology reports and to enable real-time surveillance of communicable diseases and microorganisms. The establishment and management of MiBa has been a collaborative process among stakeholders, and the present paper summarises lessons learned from this nationwide endeavour which may be relevant to similar projects in the rapidly changing landscape of health informatics.
PubMed ID
24434175 View in PubMed
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Declining incidence of meningococcal disease in Denmark, confirmed by a capture-recapture analysis for 1994 and 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161138
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Aug;136(8):1088-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
M F Howitz
S. Samuelsson
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. how@ssi.dk
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Aug;136(8):1088-95
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Notification - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Denmark has in the past 10 years experienced a decrease in the number of notified cases of meningococcal disease. In 1994 the completeness of the Notification System for Meningococcal Disease (NSMD) was estimated as 96% (95% CI 93-98). To answer the question whether the observed decrease reflects a real decrease in the incidence; we estimated the completeness of the notification system in 2002. We estimated the completeness of registration by a capture-recapture analysis. As the first data source, we used the national NSMD, which is an integrated surveillance system between the Department of Epidemiology and the Neisseria Reference Laboratory. The second independent source was the National Patient Registry (NPR). In 2002, the completeness of the NSMD was estimated as 96% (95% CI 95-98) and for the NPR as 84% (95% CI 82-85). The 'real' incidence rate was 1.9/100 000 population, which compared to 4.4/100 000 population in 1994. We concluded that the observed decrease in incidence rate is real. The NSMD in Denmark functions well and captures almost all cases of meningococcal disease. The complete registration which includes a unique personal identification number serves as an outstanding source for nationwide registry linkage studies.
Notes
Cites: J Hosp Infect. 2001 Dec;49(4):282-411740877
Cites: Commun Dis Public Health. 2001 Dec;4(4):316-812109402
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1977;9(2):105-10408918
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Sep 6;2(8506):555-82875290
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1992 Feb;108(1):19-301547836
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Feb 5;169(6):503-617303030
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1996 Apr;116(2):103-148620900
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1995;17(2):243-648654510
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Apr;133(2):205-1515816145
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2005 Dec;10(12):247-5016371694
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2006 Nov;53(4):441-917150149
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(3):331-98362229
PubMed ID
17892628 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Vet J. 2002 Aug;43(8):579-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Doug Hare
Source
Can Vet J. 2002 Aug;43(8):579-80
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Diseases
Animals
Canada
Disease Notification - methods - standards
Humans
Information Dissemination
Public Health
Veterinary Medicine
Zoonoses
Notes
Cites: Can Vet J. 1997 Oct;38(10):621-79332745
Cites: Can Vet J. 1998 Apr;39(4):217-249559212
PubMed ID
12170832 View in PubMed
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Electronic real-time surveillance for influenza-like illness: experience from the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137649
Source
Euro Surveill. 2011;16(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
K M Harder
P H Andersen
I. Bæhr
L P Nielsen
S. Ethelberg
S. Glismann
K. Molbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. katjaharder@gmail.com
Source
Euro Surveill. 2011;16(3)
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Notification - methods
Electronic Health Records
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Surveillance - methods
Seasons
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To enhance surveillance for influenza-like illness (ILI)in Denmark, a year-round electronic reporting system was established in collaboration with the Danish medical on-call service (DMOS). In order to achieve real-time surveillance of ILI, a checkbox for ILI was inserted in the electronic health record and a system for daily transfer of data to the national surveillance centre was implemented. The weekly number of all consultations in DMOS was around 60,000, and activity of ILI peaked in week 46 of 2009 when 9.5% of 73,723 consultations were classified as ILI. The incidence of ILI reached a maximum on 16 November 2009 for individuals between five and 24 years of age, followed by peaks in children under five years, adults aged between 25 and 64 years and on 27 November in senior citizens(65 years old or older). In addition to the established influenza surveillance system, this novel system was useful because it was timelier than the sentinel surveillance system and allowed for a detailed situational analysis including subgroup analysis on a daily basis.
PubMed ID
21262186 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the completeness of reporting of invasive meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200832
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Jul-Aug;90(4):250-2
Publication Type
Article

Evaluation of the national surveillance of Legionnaires' disease in Norway, 2008-2017.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307890
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Dec 03; 19(1):1624
Publication Type
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Date
Dec-03-2019
Author
Cecilia Wolff
Heidi Lange
Siri Feruglio
Line Vold
Emily MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Division for Environmental Health and Infectious Disease Control, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Postboks 222 Skøyen, 0213, Oslo, Norway. cecilia.mia.wolff@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Dec 03; 19(1):1624
Date
Dec-03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Disease Notification - methods
Female
Humans
Incidence
Legionella pneumophila
Legionnaires' Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
In Norway, Legionnaires' disease is reportable upon clinical suspicion to public health authorities and mandatorily notifiable through the Norwegian surveillance system for communicable diseases (MSIS) for both clinicians and laboratories. In the summer of 2017, several European countries reported high notification rates for Legionnaires' disease, which was not observed in Norway. We evaluated MSIS to assess if it meets its objectives of detecting cases and trends in incidence of Legionnaires' disease.
We retrieved MSIS data from 2008 to 2017 and calculated timeliness as days from sampling to notification, and internal completeness for key variables as the proportion of observations with a value. Where possible, we assessed internal validity on the presence of a plausible value. To estimate external completeness and validity we linked MSIS with hospital reimbursement claims in the Norwegian Patient Registry. To assess acceptability and representativeness, we surveyed doctors in 39 hospitals on their units' diagnostic and notification procedures, and their use of MSIS.
There were 438 notified cases. Internal completeness and internal validity were high for key variables (=95%). The median delay from sampling to notification was 4?days. There were 73 patients in MSIS only, 70 in the Norwegian Patient Registry only, and 351 in both registers. The external completeness of MSIS was 83% (95% CI 80-86%). For external validity, the positive predictive value of MSIS was 83% (95% CI 79-86%). Forty-seven respondents from 28 hospitals described testing procedures. These were inconsistent: 29 (62%) reported no systematic application of criteria for requesting legionella testing. Eighteen (38%) reported testing all patients with suspected pneumonia and a travel history. Thirty-one (66%) found the notification criteria clear.
Our results suggest that the surveillance in MSIS can detect incidence changes for Legionnaires' disease over time, by place and person, but likely does not detect every case diagnosed in Norway. We recommend wider investigation of diagnostic procedures in order to improve representativeness and awareness of MSIS notification criteria among clinicians in order to improve acceptability of the surveillance. We also recommend a more comprehensive assessment of whether patients only registered in the Norwegian Patient Registry were true Legionnaires' disease cases.
PubMed ID
31795996 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.