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1992 Genetics Society of Canada Award of Excellence Lecture: Genes, science, and society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220545
Source
Genome. 1993 Aug;36(4):631-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
C R Scriver
Author Affiliation
DeBelle Laboratory, McGill University-Montreal Children's Hospital Research Institute, QC, Canada.
Source
Genome. 1993 Aug;36(4):631-40
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors - genetics - history
Animals
Awards and Prizes
Canada
Child
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Genetics - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Mice
Rickets - genetics - history
Social Environment
Societies, Scientific
PubMed ID
8405982 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acetyldinaline: a new oral cytostatic drug with impressive differential activity against leukemic cells and normal stem cells--preclinical studies in a relevant rat model for human acute myelocytic leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23997
Source
Cancer Res. 1993 Jul 1;53(13):3008-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1993
Author
H M el-Beltagi
A C Martens
P. Lelieveld
E A Haroun
A. Hagenbeek
Author Affiliation
Department of Hemato-Oncology TNO, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Cancer Res. 1993 Jul 1;53(13):3008-14
Date
Jul-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology
Bone Marrow - drug effects
Bone Marrow Cells
Cell Differentiation - drug effects
Cell Survival - drug effects
Clone Cells
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Evaluation
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Hematopoietic Stem Cells - cytology - drug effects
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - drug therapy - pathology
Male
Phenylenediamines - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
Acetyldinaline [CI-994; GOE 5549; PD 123 654; 4-acetylamino-N-(2'-aminophenyl)-benzamide] is the acetylated derivative form of the original compound Dinaline (GOE 1734; PD 104 208). The efficacy and toxicity of Acetyldinaline for remission-induction treatment of leukemia were evaluated and compared with those observed in previous studies of Dinaline in the Brown Norway acute myelocytic leukemia, as a preclinical model for human acute myelocytic leukemia. There were three treatment groups. Leukemic animals received either 1 or 2 courses of 5 daily p.o. administrations of Acetyldinaline with a "full dose" of 23.7 mg/kg once daily (first group), a twice daily "half dose" of 11.85 mg/kg with an interval of 8 h (second group), or a "half dose" of 11.85 mg/kg once daily (third group). The drug-free interval between the 2 courses was 2 or 9 days. With repeated daily p.o. administrations of 23.7 mg/kg either in a single daily dose or a split daily dose of 2 x 11.85 mg/kg for 1 course, at least an 8-log leukemic cell kill was achieved. In contrast, with these treatment schedules, less than a 1-log cell kill of normal pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) in the femoral bone marrow was found. Split daily dose treatment was more effective resulting in 37.5% cures, while no cures were observed with the single daily treatment for one course. Treatment with single daily dose of 23.7 mg/kg or a split daily dose of 2 x 11.85 mg/kg for 2 courses, with either a 2- or 9-day interval in between, resulted in lethal toxicity in most of rats. This result was comparable with that previously observed after equimolar doses of Dinaline (20 mg/kg). The half-dose once daily treatment with Acetyldinaline (11.85 mg/kg) for 1 or 2 cycles resulted in about a 4.5 or > 8-log leukemic cell kill, respectively. Toxic side effects, i.e., damage to the gastro-intestinal tract and hemorrhages in the lungs, were more pronounced with full dose either in the single or the split daily dose regimen. No significant toxicity was observed at the half-dose treatment once daily. In conclusion, the impressive differential activity against leukemic cells and normal stem cells observed in this relevant rat model for human acute myelocytic leukemia warrants the introduction of this compound in clinical phase I/II studies.
PubMed ID
8319208 View in PubMed
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[A comparative evaluation of the effect of different types of sapropel on dynamic liver function in intact rats and in the modelling of toxic hepatitis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56727
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1998 Mar-Apr;(2):37-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
D I Kuz'menko
G N Sidorenko
E F Levitskii
B I Laptev
E I Dzhuraeva
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1998 Mar-Apr;(2):37-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Benzopyrans - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Carbon Tetrachloride Poisoning - metabolism - rehabilitation
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
English Abstract
Hepatitis, Toxic - metabolism - rehabilitation
Humic Substances - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Mud Therapy
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Reference Values
Seasons
Siberia
Abstract
A course of silicic sapropel applications compared to calcareous sapropel induced a reversible fall of total lipid concentration in blood serum of intact rats. Sapropels of different kinds and of the same kind but obtained from different depths of the same deposit varied by their ability to correct hepatic function in rats with toxic hepatitis. The highest benefit was registered in application of carbonate sapropels taken from the depth of 1.5-2.5 m.
PubMed ID
9643147 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acute enterovirus uveitis in infants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29564
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2005 May-Jun;50(3):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Lashkevich
G A Koroleva
A N Lukashev
E V Denisova
L A Katargina
I P Khoroshilova-Maslova
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2005 May-Jun;50(3):36-45
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Cataract - etiology
Cross Reactions
Disease Models, Animal
Disease Outbreaks
Echovirus Infections - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
English Abstract
Enterovirus B, Human - genetics - immunology
Epidemiology, Molecular
Eye - virology
Glaucoma - etiology
Humans
Infant
Iris - pathology
Neutralization Tests
Phylogeny
Primates
Pupil Disorders
RNA, Viral - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Uveitis - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Enterovirus uveitis (EU) is a new infant eye disease that was first detected and identified in Russia in 1980-1981. Three subtypes of human echoviruses (EV19K, EV11A, and EV11/B) caused 5 nosocomial outbreaks of EU in different Siberian cities and towns in 1980-1989, by affecting more than 750 children mainly below one year of age. Sporadic and focal EU cases (more than 200) were also retrospectively diagnosed in other regions of Russia and in different countries of the former Soviet Union. There were following clinical manifestations: common symptoms of the infection; acute uveitis (rapid focal iridic destruction, pupillary deformities, formation of membranes in the anterior chamber of the eye); and in 15-30% of cases severe complications, cataract, glaucoma, vision impairments. Uveitis strains EV19 and EV11 caused significant uveitis in primates after inoculation into the anterior chamber of the eye, as well as sepsis-like fatal disease with liver necrosis after venous infection. The uveitis strains are phylogenetically and pathogenetically close for primates to strains EV19 and EV11 isolated from young children with sepsis-like disease. The contents of this review have been published in the Reviews in Medical Virology, 2004, vol. 14, p. 241-254.
PubMed ID
16078433 View in PubMed
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Acute laryngotracheitis in the rat induced by Sendai virus: the influx of six different types of immunocompetent cells into the laryngeal mucosa differs strongly between the subglottic and the glottic compartment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31970
Source
Laryngoscope. 2001 Sep;111(9):1645-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
P. Jecker
A. McWilliam
A. Marsh
P G Holt
W J Mann
R. Pabst
J. Westermann
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Mainz Medical School, Mainz, Germany.
Source
Laryngoscope. 2001 Sep;111(9):1645-51
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Animals
B-Lymphocytes - immunology
Dendritic Cells - cytology - immunology
Disease Models, Animal
Gene Expression Regulation, Viral - immunology
Genes, MHC Class II - immunology
Glottis - cytology - immunology
Immunity, Cellular - immunology
Immunity, Mucosal - immunology
Immunocompetence - immunology
Immunohistochemistry
Killer Cells, Natural - immunology
Laryngeal Mucosa - cytology - immunology
Laryngitis - immunology - virology
Leukocyte Count
Macrophages - immunology
Neutrophils - immunology
Rats
Respirovirus
Respirovirus Infections - complications
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Tracheitis - immunology - virology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Acute laryngotracheitis is a disease in which mainly the subglottic area is infected, whereas adjacent parts of the larynx, especially the narrow glottic fold, remain unaffected. The reason for the difference between these two directly adjacent regions is unknown. Therefore, in the present study the influx of dendritic cells, neutrophils, T and B lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and macrophages into the mucosa of different laryngeal compartments was investigated after Sendai virus infection in the rat. The aims were to study both the influx of immunocompetent cells and the adhesion of the pathogen and to correlate them to the different reactions of the laryngeal areas during pseudocroup. METHODS: Acute laryngotracheitis was induced by intranasal application of Sendai virus in brown Norway rats. This virus is exclusively pneumotropic in rodents and belongs to the parainfluenza virus type 1, the main pathogen of acute laryngotracheitis in children. The numbers of dendritic cells, neutrophils, T and B lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and macrophages were determined in the supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheal mucosa on days 2, 5, 7, and 14 after virus application. Furthermore, the nucleoprotein of the virus and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II expression were detected immunohistologically on the laryngeal epithelium. RESULTS: All cell subsets entered the laryngeal mucosa during inflammation. The highest influx was detected among dendritic cells subglottically. This was accompanied by a strong virus adhesion and MHC Class II expression on the subglottic epithelium. In contrast, only a few immunocompetent cells entered the adjacent glottic mucosa, and on the glottic epithelium staining for virus nucleoprotein and MHC Class II expression was weak. CONCLUSIONS: The inflammatory response of the laryngeal mucosa shows great regional differences in this animal model during experimental viral infection. The response was characterized by a strong subglottic and a weak glottic reaction. A possible reason for this difference might be region-specific viral adhesion on the epithelium of the laryngeal areas, as well as differences in MHC Class II expression. Thus, these data agree with the clinical observation during acute laryngotracheitis and may explain why the subglottic part of the larynx is affected preferentially during pseudocroup. The molecular mechanisms mediating the different reactions await clarification.
PubMed ID
11568621 View in PubMed
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[Acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury: role of nitric oxide system]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53337
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2004;50(2):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
O O Moibenko
M Ia Iuz'kiv
L V Tumanovs'ka
A V Kotsiuruba
Author Affiliation
A.A. Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2004;50(2):34-42
Date
2004
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Animals
Arginine - pharmacology
Coronary Circulation - drug effects - physiology
Coronary Vessels - metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Dogs
English Abstract
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Male
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - enzymology - metabolism - physiopathology
Nitric Oxide - biosynthesis - physiology
Nitric Oxide Synthase - antagonists & inhibitors
Nitroarginine - pharmacology
Abstract
In experiments on the closed-chest dogs it was shown that NOS inhibition resulted in the significant alterations of hemodynamic indices (coronary and peripheral vascular resistance, cardiac output and heart rate) under local myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in comparison with control experiments. At the first time it was shown that NOS inhibition activated the autophagic destruction of cardiomyocytes in the ischemic myocardium and could reduce an area of functionally active myocardium. L-arginine administration attenuated cardio- and hemodynamic disturbances, that substantially improved the course of ischemia/reperfusion, diminished the ultrastructural changes in myocardium and prevented development of autophagic programmed cell death.
PubMed ID
15174204 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoptively transferred late allergic response is inhibited by IL-4, but not IL-5, antisense oligonucleotide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15653
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Jul;104(1):205-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
S. Molet
D. Ramos-Barbón
J G Martin
Q. Hamid
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Jul;104(1):205-14
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry - cytology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - drug effects
Cell Survival
Cells, Cultured
Cytokines - immunology
Disease Models, Animal
Immunohistochemistry
Interleukin-4 - immunology - therapeutic use
Interleukin-5 - immunology - therapeutic use
Male
Oligonucleotides, Antisense - therapeutic use
Ovalbumin - pharmacology
Pulmonary Eosinophilia - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Th2 Cells - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We have shown previously that the late airways response (LAR) can be transferred by ovalbumin-primed CD4(+) T lymphocytes in Brown Norway rats. This response is associated with an increase of eosinophils and high expression of TH2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. OBJECTIVE: In this study we hypothesized that the inhibition of IL-4 or IL-5 production in the CD4(+) cells transferred to a naive animal could decrease the LAR and prevent airway eosinophilia in response to antigen challenge. METHODS: CD4(+) cells, purified from the cervical lymph nodes of ovalbumin-sensitized rats, were maintained in culture for 6 hours with medium alone or with 10 microgram/mL IL-4 antisense (AS), IL-5 AS, or control AS oligodeoxynucleotide. Then the cells were administrated intraperitoneally to naive rats, which were challenged 2 days later by a 5% ovalbumin aerosol. The lung resistance was measured for 8 hours, and then BAL was performed. Cytospin preparations from BAL cells were assessed for the presence of eosinophils by immunocytochemistry for major basic protein and for IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma expression. RESULTS: In rats injected with IL-4 AS-treated T cells, LAR, eosinophils, and IL-4 and IL-5 expression were significantly decreased compared with the other groups. Only IL-5 expression in BAL fluid was slightly decreased consequent to the transfer of IL-5 AS-treated T cells. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that, in the CD4(+) T cell-driven LAR, the early production of IL-4, but not IL-5, by the transferred CD4(+) cells is essential for the development of the LAR.
Notes
Erratum In: J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999 Dec;104(6):1188
PubMed ID
10400863 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages abrogates bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15196
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Jul;31(1):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Eric Careau
Elyse Y Bissonnette
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche, Hôpital Laval, Institut universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l'Université Laval, Québec, Canada. eric.careau@crhl.ulaval.ca
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Jul;31(1):22-7
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Asthma - physiopathology
Bronchi - drug effects - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - genetics - physiopathology - therapy
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Clodronic Acid
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Resistance - physiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Liposomes
Macrophages, Alveolar - drug effects - immunology - transplantation
Male
Methacholine Chloride - pharmacology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reaction Time - drug effects - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Increasing evidence suggests that alveolar macrophages (AM) are involved in asthma pathogenesis. To better understand the role that these cells play, we investigated the capacity of AM from allergy-resistant rat, Sprague Dawley (SD), to modulate airway hyperresponsiveness of allergy-susceptible rat, Brown Norway (BN). AM of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized BN rats were eliminated by intratracheal instillation of liposomes containing clodronate. AM from OVA-sensitized SD rats were transferred into AM-depleted BN rats 24 h before allergen challenge. Airway responsiveness to methacholine was measured the following day. Instillation of liposomes containing clodronate in BN rats eliminated 85% AM after 3 d compared with saline liposomes. Methacholine concentration needed to increase lung resistance by 200% (EC200RL) was significantly lower in OVA-challenged BN rats (27.9 +/- 2.8 mg/ml) compared with SD rats (63.9 +/- 8.6 mg/ml). However, when AM from SD rats were transferred into AM-depleted BN rats, airway responsiveness (64.0 +/- 11.3 mg/ml) was reduced to the level of naïve rats (54.4 +/- 3.7 mg/ml) in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, transfer of AM from BN rats into SD rats did not modulate airway responsiveness. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence showing that AM may protect against the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Jul;31(1):1-215208095
Comment In: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Jul;31(1):3-715208096
PubMed ID
14962974 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoptive transfer of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis in HgCl2 injected rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57752
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1992;11 Suppl:101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A. Saoudi
B. Bellon
Y. de Kozak
P. Druet
Author Affiliation
Pathologie rénale et vasculaire, INSERM U28, Hôpital Broussais, Paris, France.
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1992;11 Suppl:101-5
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens - immunology
Arrestin
Autoantigens - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - therapy
Disease Models, Animal
Eye Proteins - immunology
Female
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Male
Mercuric Chloride
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinitis - immunology - therapy
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Uveitis - immunology - therapy
Abstract
We previously demonstrated that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) injected-(Lewis x Brown-Norway) F1 rats are protected against experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) induced by active immunization with the retinal S-antigen (S-Ag). To better understand the mechanisms of the protection promoted by HgCl2, we studied the effect of HgCl2-induced autoimmune disease on transferred EAU. We demonstrate herein that HgCl2 has no effect on adoptively transferred EAU. Therefore, the HgCl2-induced autoimmune disease does not affect effector S-Ag specific T cells activated in vitro but acts at an earlier stage.
PubMed ID
1424735 View in PubMed
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[A fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) as a model organism for studies of brain diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169705
Source
Duodecim. 2006;122(4):443-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Liisa Myllykangas
Tapio Heino
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsanin perinnöllisyystieteen laitos jaa Neurotieteen tutkimuskeskus, Biomedicum Helsinki, Helsingin yliopisto. liisa.myllykangas@helsinki.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2006;122(4):443-50
Date
2006
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Disease Models, Animal
Drosophila melanogaster
Finland
Humans
Sensitivity and specificity
PubMed ID
16623099 View in PubMed
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500 records – page 1 of 50.