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The 3rd S-ECCO IBD Masterclass, Copenhagen, February 19-20, 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262764
Source
Tech Coloproctol. 2014 Aug;18(8):769-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
O. Zmora
Source
Tech Coloproctol. 2014 Aug;18(8):769-70
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses as topic
Denmark
Disease Management
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - therapy
PubMed ID
24962494 View in PubMed
Less detail

2006 Canadian clinical practice guidelines on the management and prevention of obesity in adults and children [summary].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164223
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2007
Author
David C W Lau
James D Douketis
Katherine M Morrison
Irene M Hramiak
Arya M Sharma
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Julia McFarlane Diabetes Research Centre, Diabetes and Endocrine Research Group, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dcwlau@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Date
Apr-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Bariatric Surgery
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Bulimia Nervosa - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Diet
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Obesity - classification - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Research - trends
Waist-Hip Ratio
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):139118025434
PubMed ID
17420481 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital--a descriptive study from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264480
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Patrik Pekkari
Per-Olof Bylund
Hans Lindgren
Mikael Öman
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals, Low-Volume - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital.
This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009.
The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1-57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT
Notes
Cites: Curr Opin Pediatr. 2007 Jun;19(3):265-917505184
Cites: J Trauma. 2000 Apr;48(4):624-7; discussion 627-810780593
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Cites: J Surg Educ. 2013 Sep-Oct;70(5):618-2724016373
PubMed ID
25124882 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120508
Source
J Am Soc Hypertens. 2012 Sep-Oct;6(5):346-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anton R Kiselev
Vladimir I Gridnev
Vladimir A Shvartz
Olga M Posnenkova
Pavel Ya Dovgalevsky
Author Affiliation
Centre of New Cardiological Informational Technologies, Saratov Research Institute of Cardiology, Saratov, Russia. antonkis@list.ru
Source
J Am Soc Hypertens. 2012 Sep-Oct;6(5):346-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - methods - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Cellular Phone
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Disease Management
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Medication Therapy Management
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Management - organization & administration
Quality Improvement
Russia
Text Messaging
Abstract
The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P
PubMed ID
22995803 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active surveillance for localized prostate cancer: an analysis of patient contacts and utilization of healthcare resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271603
Source
Scand J Urol. 2015 Feb;49(1):43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Frederik B Thomsen
Kasper D Berg
M Andreas Røder
Peter Iversen
Klaus Brasso
Source
Scand J Urol. 2015 Feb;49(1):43-50
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulatory Care - economics - utilization
Biopsy, Large-Core Needle - adverse effects - economics - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Disease Management
Disease Progression
Health Resources - economics - utilization
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kallikreins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - pathology - therapy
Transurethral Resection of Prostate
Watchful Waiting - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Evidence supports active surveillance (AS) as a means to reduce overtreatment of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). The consequences of close and long-standing follow-up with regard to outpatient visits, tests and repeated biopsies are widely unknown. This study investigated the trajectory and costs of AS in patients with localized PCa.
In total, 317 PCa patients were followed in a prospective, single-arm AS cohort. The primary outcomes were number of patient contacts, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, biopsies, hospital admissions due to biopsy complications and patients eventually undergoing curative treatment. The secondary outcome was cost.
The 5 year cumulative incidence of discontinued AS in a competing-risk model was 40%. During the first 5 years of AS patients underwent a median of two biopsy sets, and patients were seen in an outpatient clinic including PSA testing three to four times annually. In total, 38 of the 406 biopsy sessions led to hospital admission and 87 of the 317 patients required treatment for bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). With a median of 3.7 years' follow-up, the total cost of AS was euro (€) 1,240,286. Assuming all patients had otherwise undergone primary radical prostatectomy, the cost difference favoured AS with a net benefit of €662,661 (35% reduction).
AS entails a close clinical follow-up with a considerable risk of rebiopsy complication, treatment of BOO and subsequent delayed definitive therapy. This risk should be weighed against a potential economic benefit and reduction in the risk of overtreatment compared to immediate radical treatment.
PubMed ID
25363612 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute heart failure: perspectives from a randomized trial and a simultaneous registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120187
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2012 Nov;5(6):735-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Justin A Ezekowitz
Jia Hu
Diego Delgado
Adrian F Hernandez
Padma Kaul
Rolland Leader
Guy Proulx
Sean Virani
Michel White
Shelley Zieroth
Christopher O'Connor
Cynthia M Westerhout
Paul W Armstrong
Author Affiliation
Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute and the University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. jae2@ualberta.ca
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2012 Nov;5(6):735-41
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disease Management
Female
Heart Failure - mortality - physiopathology - therapy
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Agents - therapeutic use
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - therapeutic use
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Randomized controlled trials (RCT) are limited by their generalizability to the broader nontrial population. To provide a context for Acute Study of Nesiritide in Decompensated Heart Failure (ASCEND-HF) trial, we designed a complementary registry to characterize clinical characteristics, practice patterns, and in-hospital outcomes of acute heart failure patients.
Eligible patients for the registry included those with a principal diagnosis of acute heart failure (ICD-9-CM 402 and 428; ICD-10 I50.x, I11.0, I13.0, I13.2) from 8 sites participating in ASCEND-HF (n=697 patients, 2007-2010). Baseline characteristics, treatments, and hospital outcomes from the registy were compared with ASCEND-HF RCT patients from 31 Canadian sites (n=465, 2007-2010). Patients in the registry were older, more likely to be female, and have chronic respiratory disease, less likely to have diabetes mellitus: they had a similar incidence of ischemic HF, atrial fibrillation, and similar B-type natriuretic peptide levels. Registry patients had higher systolic blood pressure (registry: median 132 mm Hg [interquartile range 115-151 mm Hg]; RCT: median 120 mm Hg [interquartile range 110-135 mm Hg]) and ejection fraction (registry: median 40% [interquartile range 27-58%]; RCT: median 29% [interquartile range 20-40 mm Hg]) than RCT patients. Registry patients presented more often via ambulance and had a similar total length of stay as RCT patients. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the registry compared with the RCT patients (9.3% versus 1.3%,P
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;9(12):67323090086
PubMed ID
23032196 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute heart failure with and without concomitant acute coronary syndromes: patient characteristics, management, and survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263842
Source
J Card Fail. 2014 Oct;20(10):723-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Tuukka Tarvasmäki
Veli-Pekka Harjola
Markku S Nieminen
Krista Siirilä-Waris
Jukka Tolonen
Heli Tolppanen
Johan Lassus
Source
J Card Fail. 2014 Oct;20(10):723-30
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Acute Disease
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Disease Management
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Heart Failure - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Myocardial Revascularization - methods - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Edema - etiology
Shock, Cardiogenic - etiology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) may precipitate up to a third of acute heart failure (AHF) cases. We assessed the characteristics, initial management, and survival of AHF patients with (ACS-AHF) and without (nACS-AHF) concomitant ACS.
Data from 620 AHF patients were analyzed in a prospective multicenter study. The ACS-AHF patients (32%) more often presented with de novo AHF (61% vs. 43%; P
PubMed ID
25079300 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adherence to guidelines on management of acute coronary syndrome in Russian hospitals and outcomes of hospitalization (data from the RECORD-2 Registry)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115057
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(1):14-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
A D Érlikh
M S Kharchenko
O L Barbarash
V V Kashtalap
M V Zykov
T B Pecherina
I I Shevchenko
R R Islamov
E D Kosmacheva
L K Kruberg
O A Pozdniakova
N G Goroshko
V A Markov
A G Syrkina
N V Belokopytova
V V Gorbunov
A S Gagarkina
T V Kalinkina
O A Zaitseva
S A Luk'ianov
D P Tagirova
V M Provotorov
N A Gratsianskii
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(1):14-22
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Aged
Diagnostic Techniques, Cardiovascular
Disease Management
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Myocardial Revascularization - methods
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Complete following existing guidelines for management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is known to be associated with better outcomes. Partly this is explained by lesser adherence to recommendations in high risk patients. Aim of our study was to assess relationship between degree of following current guidelines and in hospital outcomes independently from initial assessment of risk.
Each key recommendation from guidelines issued between 2008 and 2011 (13 for STE ACS, 12 for NSTE ACS) was given weight of 1. Sum of these units constituted index of guideline adherence (IGA). IGA was retrospectively calculated for 1656 patients included in Russian independent ACS registry RECORD-2 (7 hospitals, duration 04.2009 to 04.2011). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to quartiles of IGA distribution: 1) low adherence group (quartiles I-II); 2) high adherence group (quartiles III-IV).
In low adherence compared with high adherence group there were significantly more patients more or equal 65 years (=0.0007), with chronic heart failure [CHF] (
PubMed ID
23548345 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing care for traumatic brain injury: findings from the IMPACT studies and perspectives on future research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106604
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1200-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Andrew I R Maas
Gordon D Murray
Bob Roozenbeek
Hester F Lingsma
Isabella Butcher
Gillian S McHugh
James Weir
Juan Lu
Ewout W Steyerberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium. Electronic address: andrew.maas@uza.be.
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1200-10
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - therapy
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Disease Management
Europe
Forecasting
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
International Cooperation
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Multicenter Studies as Topic - methods - standards
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - methods - standards
Research Design
Symptom Assessment - standards
Trauma Severity Indices
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Research in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is challenging for several reasons; in particular, the heterogeneity between patients regarding causes, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome. Advances in basic science have failed to translate into successful clinical treatments, and the evidence underpinning guideline recommendations is weak. Because clinical research has been hampered by non-standardised data collection, restricted multidisciplinary collaboration, and the lack of sensitivity of classification and efficacy analyses, multidisciplinary collaborations are now being fostered. Approaches to deal with heterogeneity have been developed by the IMPACT study group. These approaches can increase statistical power in clinical trials by up to 50% and are also relevant to other heterogeneous neurological diseases, such as stroke and subarachnoid haemorrhage. Rather than trying to limit heterogeneity, we might also be able to exploit it by analysing differences in treatment and outcome between countries and centres in comparative effectiveness research. This approach has great potential to advance care in patients with TBI.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1132-324139679
PubMed ID
24139680 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing the chronic care road map: a contemporary overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143105
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):72-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sara Ahmed
Amede Gogovor
Mylene Kosseim
Lise Poissant
Richard Riopelle
Maureen Simmonds
Marilyn Krelenbaum
Terrence Montague
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. sara.ahmed@mcgill.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):72-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronic Disease - prevention & control - therapy
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Disease Management
Humans
Models, organizational
Program Evaluation
Abstract
In an effort to assess and advance the community-based model of chronic care, we reviewed a contemporary spectrum of Canadian chronic disease management and prevention (CDMP) programs with a participatory audience of administrators, academics, professional and non-professional providers and patients. While many questions remain unanswered, several common characteristics of CDMP success were apparent. These included community-based partnerships with aligned goals; inter-professional and non-professional care, including patient self-management; measured and shared information on practices and outcomes; and visible leadership. Principal improvement opportunities identified were the enhanced engagement of all stakeholders; further efficacy evidence for team care; facile information systems, with clear rationales for data selection, access, communication and security; and increased education of, and resource support for, patients and caregivers. Two immediate actions were suggested. One was a broad and continuing communication plan highlighting CDMP issues and opportunities. The other was a standardized survey of team structures, interventions, measurements and communications in ongoing CDMP programs, with a causal analysis of their relation to outcomes. In the longer term, the key needs requiring action were more inter-professional education of health human resources and more practical information systems available to all stakeholders. Things can be better.
PubMed ID
20523157 View in PubMed
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