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34 records – page 1 of 4.

AIDS-related risks in the health care setting: HIV testing of health care workers and patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221292
Source
Queens Law J. 1993;18(1):71-128
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
W F Flanagan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada.
Source
Queens Law J. 1993;18(1):71-128
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
HIV Infections - diagnosis - transmission
Health Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient - prevention & control
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Mandatory Testing - legislation & jurisprudence
Prejudice
Abstract
Do patients and health care workers have the legal right to know each other's HIV status? Professor Flanagan argues that they do not. Given that with appropriate precautions the risk of transmitting HIV in the health care setting is extremely small and that the discriminatory consequences of HIV disclosure can be extremely high, it is suggested that the right of a patient or a health care worker not to disclose their HIV status must outweigh the other's "right to know."
PubMed ID
16086490 View in PubMed
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Bareback sex and the law: the difficult issue of HIV status disclosure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165071
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2006 Jul;44(7):26-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Dave Holmes
Patrick O'Byrne
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dholmes@uottawa.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2006 Jul;44(7):26-33
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Counseling
Criminal Law
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
HIV Infections - nursing - prevention & control
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Partners
Abstract
1. Unsafe anal intercourse (bareback sex) is on the rise within the gay community. 2. Barebacking constitutes a sexual practice with strong HIV-related legal implications. Nurses need to be aware of public health laws to be able to protect clients from undue legal prosecution. 3. Nurses need to be aware of the components of HIV pretest counseling. 4. Adopting a nonjudgmental, matter-of-fact approach is essential in establishing effective therapeutic relationships with clients who engage in bareback sex.
PubMed ID
17310832 View in PubMed
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Child sexual abuse - Initial suspicion and legal outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295574
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2018 Oct; 291:39-43
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Minna Joki-Erkkilä
Jenni Niemi
Noora Ellonen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Child Psychiatry and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Pirkanmaa District Hospital, Finland. Electronic address: minna.joki-erkkila@pshp.fi.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2018 Oct; 291:39-43
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Anal Canal - injuries
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - diagnosis - legislation & jurisprudence
Child, Preschool
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Interview, Psychological
Male
Physical Examination
Retrospective Studies
Vagina - injuries
Vulva - injuries
Abstract
To evaluate the association of primary reason to suspect child sexual abuse with the legal end-point in medically examined, police reported cases.
Observational post hoc analysis of retrospective review of records of 155 medically examined, police reported alleged child sexual abuse (CSA) cases during 2001-2009. Primary referral indications for medical examinations or criminal investigations were analyzed with an end-point in the legal process. The data consists of official investigation documents from University Hospital records, police, crime laboratories, state prosecutor, and courts of Law.
The median age of the children was 7.1 years (range 11 months-17.5 years) at the time when suspicion of sexual abuse was reported to police. Conviction of the alleged perpetrator was significantly more likely in cases where the child's disclosure was the reason for the initial suspicion of CSA, compared to cases with referrals for "suspicious circumstances" (39/92, 42.4% vs. 7/37, 19%, p
PubMed ID
30125769 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community treatment orders: the ethical balancing act in community mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152104
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Mar;16(2):177-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
N. Snow
W J Austin
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Faculty, Centre for Nursing Studies, St. John's, NL, Canada. nsnow@cns.nf.ca
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Mar;16(2):177-86
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Freedom
Homicide - legislation & jurisprudence
Human Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Mandatory Reporting
Mental Disorders - psychology
Safety
Universities
Virginia
Abstract
Community treatment orders (CTOs) are legal mechanisms by which an individual with a mental illness and a history of non-compliance and potential for violence can be mandated (against their will) to undergo psychiatric treatment in an outpatient setting. Although CTOs are increasingly being adopted by governments as a means of protecting both mentally ill persons and society itself, their use continues to stimulate considerable debate. While there is some evidence of their potential benefits in promoting treatment compliance and reducing hospital stays, there is concern that they infringe on the mental health client's human rights and freedoms. Consideration of the ethical and practical implications of the use of CTOs must continue. In this paper, some of the most pressing issues are identified and discussed.
PubMed ID
19281549 View in PubMed
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Comprehending disclosure: must patients understand the risks they run?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181379
Source
Med Law Int. 2000;4(2):97-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
Kevin Williams
Author Affiliation
Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
Source
Med Law Int. 2000;4(2):97-109
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Comprehension
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Great Britain
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Liability, Legal
Malpractice
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians - legislation & jurisprudence
Risk
Abstract
It is well known that competent patients must be told about the risks of proposed medical procedures. This paper argues that recent professional guidelines and the law of negligence now take matters further by requiring doctors to take reasonable steps in an attempt to ensure that patients understand the risks they are being invited to run, so facilitating meaningful choices and the opportunity to give a properly informed consent.
PubMed ID
14983870 View in PubMed
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The confidentiality of patient and physician information in pharmacy prescription records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181323
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Mar 2;170(5):815-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2-2004
Author
Dick E Zoutman
B Douglas Ford
Assil R Bassili
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen's University, 76 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario K7L 2V7, Canada. zoutman@cliff.path.queensu.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Mar 2;170(5):815-6
Date
Mar-2-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - legislation & jurisprudence
Pharmacy
Physician-Patient Relations
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Jan 19;283(3):373-8010647801
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 1997 Summer-Fall;25(2-3):98-110, 8211066504
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Oct 31;163(9):1146-811079059
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Aug 20;167(4):393-612197705
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Feb 15;326(7385):37312586673
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Jul 8;169(1):5, 712847016
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):997-10169834730
Comment In: CMAJ. 2004 Sep 28;171(7):711-2; author reply 71215451823
PubMed ID
14993178 View in PubMed
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The constitutionality of mandatory reporting of gunshot wounds legislation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170255
Source
Health Law Rev. 2005;14(1):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Wayne Renke
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Health Law Rev. 2005;14(1):3-8
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Law Enforcement
Legislation, Medical
Mandatory Reporting
Police
Privacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Wounds, Gunshot
PubMed ID
16538769 View in PubMed
Less detail

34 records – page 1 of 4.