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1135 records – page 1 of 114.

A 5.5 year prospective study of self-reported musculoskeletal pain and of fibromyalgia in a female population: significance and natural history.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201887
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 1999;18(2):114-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
K O Forseth
O. Førre
J T Gran
Author Affiliation
Rikshospitalet, Centre for Rheumatic Diseases, The National Hospital, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 1999;18(2):114-21
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Female
Fibromyalgia - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Norway - epidemiology
Pain - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Prospective Studies
Self Disclosure
Abstract
In order to investigate the significance and outcome of self-reported pain and fibromyalgia (FM) in a female population, 214 women with initially self-reported pain were interviewed and examined in 1990 and 1995. In 1990 the sample was categorised into four pain status groups: 46 individuals (21%) with nonchronic (recurrent) pain, 69 (32%) with chronic regional pain 42 (20%) with chronic multifocal pain and 57 with chronic widespread pain (CWP). The last group comprised 39 (18%) women with FM, fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria. The frequency of tender points, associated symptoms called historical variables and individuals with low education increased statistically significantly with increasing pain status. In 1995, 48 women had non-chronic pain (23%), 46 (21%) chronic regional pain, 39 (18%) chronic multifocal pain and 81 (38%) CWP; of these, 71 (33%) had FM. Eleven of the 39 women initially with FM no longer fulfilled the criteria. The risk of developing CWP among the 157 individuals with initially a lower pain status was statistically higher in women with chronic multifocal pain than in women with less pain extension. Self-reported pain constitutes a continuum of pain severity and thus of clinical and social significance. The overall outcome was poor with an increase of individuals with CWP and FM. The prognosis of chronic multifocal pain, CWP and FM was especially poor. About half of the women with non-chronic pain or chronic regional pain did not deteriorate. However, because the process of developing FM started with localised pain in most cases, self-reported pain of any severity confers a risk for developing FM. Identifying possible risk factors for FM are at present under study and will be presented separately in another report.
PubMed ID
10357115 View in PubMed
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[7000 AID treatments, 660 pregnancies in 5 years in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65845
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Sep 17;77(38):3229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1980

Absorbing information about a child's incurable cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96768
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patrizia Lannen
Joanne Wolfe
Jennifer Mack
Erik Onelov
Ullakarin Nyberg
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Author Affiliation
Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess parents' ability to absorb information that their child's cancer was incurable and to identify factors associated with parents' ability to absorb this information. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An anonymous mail-in questionnaire study was performed as a population-based investigation in Sweden between August and October of 2001. 449 parents who lost a child to cancer 4-9 years earlier (response rate 80%) completed the survey. 191 (43%) of the bereaved parents were fathers and 251 (56%) were mothers. RESULTS: Sixty percent of parents (n = 258) reported that they were able to absorb the information that their child's illness was incurable. Parents were better able to absorb this information when the information was given in an appropriate manner (RR 1.6; CI 1.3-2.0), when they shared their problems with others during the child's illness course (RR 1.4; CI 1.1-1.8) and when they had no history of depression (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.8). Parents who reported that they were able to absorb the information were more likely to have expressed their farewells to the child in their desired manner (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Parents who received information that their child's illness was incurable in an appropriate manner are more likely to absorb that information. Whether or not parents are able to absorb the information that their child's cancer is incurable has implications in terms of preparation for the child's impending death.
PubMed ID
20523086 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and sexual experience prior to disclosure to health care providers among men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada: implications for targeted vaccination programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122620
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2012
Author
Claudia Rank
Mark Gilbert
Gina Ogilvie
Gayatri C Jayaraman
Rick Marchand
Terry Trussler
Robert S Hogg
Reka Gustafson
Tom Wong
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Date
Aug-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Condylomata Acuminata - prevention & control
Disclosure
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Men who have sex with men (MSM) may benefit from human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine due to increased risk for HPV infection and related disease. We assessed HPV vaccine acceptability and sexual experience prior to disclosure to Health Care Providers (HCP) to understand implications of targeted vaccination strategies for MSM.
From July 2008 to February 2009, 1169 MSM aged =19 years were recruited at community venues in Vancouver. We assessed key variables from a self-administered questionnaire and independent predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability using multivariate logistic regression.
Of 1041 respondents, 697 (67.0%) were willing to receive HPV vaccine and 71.3% had heard of HPV. Significant multivariate predictors of higher vaccine acceptability were (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]): previous diagnosis of genital warts (1.7 [1.1, 2.6]), disclosure of sexual behavior to HCP (1.6 [1.1, 2.3]), annual income at least $20,000 (1.5 [1.1, 2.1]), previous hepatitis A or B vaccination (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]), and no recent recreational drug use (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]). Most MSM (78.7%) had disclosed sexual behavior to HCP and median time from first sexual contact with males to disclosure was 6.0 years (IQR 2-14 years); for men =26 years these were 72.0% and 3.0 years (IQR 1-8 years) respectively.
Willingness to receive HPV vaccine was substantial among MSM in Vancouver; however, acceptability varied by demographics, risk, and health history. HPV vaccine programs delivered by HCP would offer limited benefit given the duration of time from sexual debut to disclosure to HCP.
PubMed ID
22796376 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of reported weight and menstrual status in teenage girls with eating disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70529
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2005 Dec;38(4):375-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Ingemar Swenne
Erik Belfrage
Barbro Thurfjell
Ingemar Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. ingemar.swenne@akademiska.se
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2005 Dec;38(4):375-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Amenorrhea - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Body Weight
Bulimia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics
Sweden
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The current study investigated the accuracy of reported current and historical weights and of menstrual status in teenage girls with eating disorders. METHOD: Reported current weight in one interview was compared with measured weight at another occasion. Reported historical weights were compared with documented weights from growth charts of the school health services. Reports of menstrual status from two different interviews were compared. RESULTS: The overall correlation between reported and measured/documented weight was high. Current weight was reported with high accuracy in all diagnostic groups and without tendencies to underreport. Patients with bulimia nervosa, but not those with anorexia nervosa, underreported their historical top weight. The most common reason for large discrepancies between reported and documented historical weights was that the two weights compared referred to different time points. The reports on menstrual status were divergent for 13% of the patients, most notably 4 of 15 patients on oral contraceptives had been categorized as having menstruations in one of the interviews. CONCLUSION: Reported weight history and menstrual status are of high accuracy in teenage girls with eating disorders.
PubMed ID
16231335 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of self-reported body weight compared to measured body weight. A population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235826
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
L. Jalkanen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Tanskanen
P. Puska
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
In 1977, in the evaluation of the prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases, 11,880 persons in Eastern Finland were asked to report their own weight on a questionnaire. Each participant was weighted during the following clinical examination. The data of the self-reported body weight were analysed according to sex, age, measured weight and body-mass index (BMI). The results showed that older people underestimated their weight to a greater extent than did younger people of both sexes. The error between measured and self-reported weight was greater in heavier subjects than in thinner individuals. In both sexes weight estimate error (measured weight minus self-reported weight) correlated more strongly with high BMI than with measured weight. Associations between weight estimate error and other variables were studied using a multiple regression model. Men whose annual family income was low were more likely to underestimate their weight than the men with a high annual income. In general, women reported their weight more correctly than men did. Older women were more likely to report their weight less than younger women, whereas women who visited their doctor frequently or who had higher annual family incomes were more aware of their actual body weight than those who had few doctor's consultations or whose family income was low. In men 5.2% and in women 8.3% of the variation in the weight estimate error was explained by the regression model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3616534 View in PubMed
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Achieving closure through disclosure: experience in a pediatric institution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180246
Source
J Pediatr. 2004 May;144(5):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004

1135 records – page 1 of 114.