Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3 records – page 1 of 1.

The effect of traumatic bereavement on tsunami-exposed survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98711
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2009 Dec;22(6):497-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Kerstin Bergh Johannesson
Tom Lundin
Christina M Hultman
Anna Lindam
Johan Dyster-Aas
Filip Arnberg
Per-Olof Michel
Author Affiliation
National Center for Disaster Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. kerstin.bergh.johannesson@neuro.uu.se
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2009 Dec;22(6):497-504
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Bereavement
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disasters
Female
Grief
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Risk factors
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - ethnology
Thailand
Travel
Tsunamis
Young Adult
Abstract
Fourteen months after the 2004 tsunami, mental health outcome was assessed in 187 bereaved relatives, 308 bereaved friends, and in 3,020 nonbereaved Swedish survivors. Of the bereaved relatives, 41% reported posttraumatic stress reactions and 62% reported impaired general mental health. Having been caught or chased by the tsunami in combination with bereavement was associated with increased posttraumatic stress reactions. Complicated grief reactions among relatives were almost as frequent as posttraumatic stress reactions. The highest levels of psychological distress were found among those who had lost children. Traumatic bereavement, in combination with exposure to life danger, is probably a risk factor for mental health sequelae after a natural disaster.
PubMed ID
19937645 View in PubMed
Less detail

Properties of Swedish posttraumatic stress measures after a disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104524
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2014 May;28(4):402-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Filip K Arnberg
Per-Olof Michel
Kerstin Bergh Johannesson
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset ing 10, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: filip.arnberg@neuro.uu.se.
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2014 May;28(4):402-9
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Disasters
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Tsunamis
Abstract
This study evaluated the properties of Swedish versions of self-report measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with emphasis on the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). Survey data from adult survivors 1, 3, and 6 years after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami (n=1506) included the IES-R (from which the IES-6 was derived) and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). The PTSD Checklist (PCL) was included in one survey. A structured clinical interview was performed after 6 years (n=142). Factor analyses of the IES-R and PCL indicated that a dysphoric-arousal model provided good fit invariant across assessments. Both measures were accurate in excluding PTSD while all measures provided poorer positive predictive values. The IES-R, but not the IES-6 and GHQ-12, evidenced stability across assessments. In conclusion, the Swedish IES-R and PCL are sound measures of chronic PTSD, and the findings illustrate important temporal aspects of PTSD assessment.
PubMed ID
24726240 View in PubMed
Less detail

Six years after the wave. Trajectories of posttraumatic stress following a natural disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274269
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2015 Dec;36:15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Kerstin Bergh Johannesson
Hans Arinell
Filip K Arnberg
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2015 Dec;36:15-24
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Bereavement
Disasters
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Survivors - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tsunamis
Abstract
The characteristics of long-term trajectories of distress after disasters are unclear, since few studies include a comparison group. This study examines trajectories of recovery among survivors in comparison to individuals with indirect exposure.
Postal surveys were sent to Swedish tourists, repatriated from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami (n=2268), at 1, 3, and 6 years after the tsunami to assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) and poor mental health. Items were used to ascertain high and moderate disaster exposure groups and an indirect exposure comparison group.
Long-term PTS trajectories were best characterized by a resilient (72.3%), a severe chronic (4.6%), a moderate chronic (11.2%) and a recovering (11.9%) trajectory. Trajectories reported higher levels of PTS than the comparison group. Exposure severity and bereavement were highly influential risk factors.
These findings have implications regarding anticipation of long-term psychological adjustment after natural disasters and need for interventions after a single traumatic event with few secondary stressors.
PubMed ID
26401968 View in PubMed
Less detail