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808 records – page 1 of 81.

1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2003 Oct-Dec;18(4):278-9015310039
Cites: Disaster Manag Response. 2005 Jan-Mar;3(1):11-615627125
Cites: Mil Med. 2007 May;172(5):471-717521092
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;23(2):144-51; discussion 152-318557294
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jun 1;152(11):733-720197507
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):9-1019557952
Cites: Science. 2010 Feb 5;327(5966):638-920133550
Cites: Nature. 2010 Feb 18;463(7283):878-920164905
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):3-819557951
PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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2004 Tsunami: long-term psychological consequences for Swiss tourists in the area at the time of the disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151473
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2009 May;43(5):420-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Bernd Kraemer
Lutz Wittmann
Josef Jenewein
Ulrich Schnyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Zurich, Culmannstrasse 8, Zurich CH-8091, Switzerland. bernd.kraemer@usz.ch
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2009 May;43(5):420-5
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis
Depression - diagnosis
Disasters
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis
Survivors - psychology
Switzerland - ethnology
Tidal Waves
Abstract
Most of the data on psychological outcome and the mental health treatment available following natural disasters originate from the indigenous population of the region destroyed. Examining tourists returning from the area affected by the 2004 tsunami presents an opportunity of studying the impact of natural disasters on psychological outcome and mental health treatment in their countries of origin. The aim of the present study was to extend the current knowledge on psychiatric morbidity and potential positive outcomes, as well as subsequent mental health treatment following a natural disaster, based on the results from a sample of home-coming Swiss tourists.
Tourists who had been potentially affected by the 2004 tsunami were assessed using the Post-traumatic Diagnostic Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory. Outcome variables were related to the degree of tsunami exposure. In addition, mental health treatment before and after the tsunami was assessed.
Of the 342 respondents, 55 (16.8%) fulfilled the criteria of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Evidence of anxiety or depressive disorder was found in 17.8% and 8.0%, respectively. The tsunami victims who had been directly affected showed significantly more symptoms of anxiety, depression and PTSD, as well as post-traumatic personal growth, than tourists who were indirectly affected or unaffected. A total of 12.3% of untreated respondents fulfilled the criteria for PTSD and 38% of respondents who had received psychiatric treatment were still fulfilling PTSD criteria 2(1/2) years after the tsunami.
A marked percentage of respondents reported symptoms of PTSD but they remained untreated or were treated insufficiently. We recommend that tourists returning from regions affected by natural disasters be informed about PTSD and that careful screening be given to those found to be at risk of PTSD. An open-door policy of mental health services is particularly needed for tourists returning home who have been affected by large-scale disasters.
PubMed ID
19373702 View in PubMed
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[About development of All-Russian Service for Disaster Medicine at the present stage].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104791
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Oct;334(10):4-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
S F Goncharov
A Ia Fisun
B V Bobii
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Oct;334(10):4-20
Date
Oct-2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disaster Medicine - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - organization & administration - standards
Disasters
Humans
Russia
Abstract
The information about foundation, development and main areas of activity of All-Russian Service for Disaster Medicine is given. Almost 20 years professional staff members help to save lives and health of people injured in emergency situations in Russia and other countries. There are 81 territorial centers for disaster medicine. The main center is All-Russian center for disaster medicine Zaschita. Its organizational structure, performance indexes including development of information and communication technology, telehealth, organization of firs-aid in a traffic collision are considered. The main ways of improvement of the whole service for disaster medicine including service for disaster medicine of Ministry of Defense are shown.
PubMed ID
24611294 View in PubMed
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[Accident and disaster training of media personnel in hospital environment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192354
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 31;98(44):4865-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2001
Author
J. Lundälv
Author Affiliation
Akut- och katastrofmedicinskt centrum (AKMC), Olycksanalysgruppen, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 31;98(44):4865-6
Date
Oct-31-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Crisis Intervention
Disaster planning
Disasters
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Journalism, Medical
Mass Media
Photography
Sweden
PubMed ID
11729801 View in PubMed
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Accounting for vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage in pandemic critical care triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96997
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Critical Care
Cultural Characteristics
Disaster Planning - trends
Disease Outbreaks
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - ethnology - mortality - virology
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Social Class
Triage - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In a pandemic situation, resources in intensive care units may be stretched to the breaking point, and critical care triage may become necessary. In such a situation, I argue that a patient's combined vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage should be a justification for giving that patient some priority for critical care. In this article I present an example of a critical care triage protocol that recognizes the moral relevance of vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage, from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
20465071 View in PubMed
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[A comparative evaluation of the treatment procedure for the victims of the earthquakes on Iturup and Sakhalin].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210003
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1997 Jan;318(1):43-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997

Acting at a disaster site: experiences expressed by Swedish nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210291
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Jan;25(1):155-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
B O Suserud
H. Haljamäe
Author Affiliation
Borås University College of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Jan;25(1):155-62
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Disasters
Emergency Nursing - education
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Railroads
Sweden
Abstract
In a previous study the knowledge and views of nursing students on how they thought nurses, both in their professional role and as private persons, should act at a disaster site were evaluated. In the present study the practical functional role and experiences of nurses (n = 16) in two major disaster situations (one 'load and go' and one 'stay and play' type of emergency situation) were assessed from personal interviews along a standardized questionnaire. Nurses more routinely involved in emergency care and nurses with no or limited previous practical experience of disaster nursing were included in the study. Leadership-type actions, i.e. a systematic way of attempting to survey and to comprehend the situation, what has happened, and how many injured there may be at the site of the accident, were reported by most of the experienced nurses, while inexperienced nurses were involved mainly in the immediate care of injured according to directions given by more experienced members of the emergency team. Readiness for action, reflected by having a feeling of being prepared for work at the disaster site, was experienced more often by nurses with considerable previous experience of disaster nursing than by nurses with limited experience. Negative experiences, such as feelings of being insufficient, of unreality, mental strain, and problems in understanding the organization, were commonly mentioned by the inexperienced nurses. The present study stresses the importance, for all types of nurses, of more systematic training in disaster nursing.
PubMed ID
9004024 View in PubMed
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Acting at a disaster site: views expressed by Swedish nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73369
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Apr;18(4):613-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
B O Suserud
Author Affiliation
Boras College of Health and Caring Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Apr;18(4):613-20
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum
Disaster Planning - organization & administration - standards
Education, Nursing - methods - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Job Description
Middle Aged
Nursing Education Research
Patient care team
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
There is a common interest in Swedish society in preparing nurses well for disasters. A special course in the basic nurse education programme is devoted to disaster nursing. The aim of this study is to investigate nursing students' knowledge and views of their own action at the disaster site, both in their professional role and as private persons. The present study is a descriptive one based on the students' written answers. The result shows that the students emphasize contacting the overall disaster officer, surveying the situation and carrying out basic life-saving measures in Sweden known as the ABCs. They also stress the importance of staying calm and, to a lesser extent, seeing to the needs of the mentally shocked. Thus the nursing students seem to regard treatment of physical injuries as most important in the disaster situation.
PubMed ID
8496509 View in PubMed
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Activity of the medical profession on the occasion of a disaster at sea. The tragedy of the sinking of the Andrea Doria witnessed by the ship's doctor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246235
Source
J R Nav Med Serv. 1980;66(1):63-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
B. Tortori-Donati
Source
J R Nav Med Serv. 1980;66(1):63-70
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disasters
Humans
Italy
Naval Medicine
Sweden
United States
PubMed ID
7420312 View in PubMed
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808 records – page 1 of 81.