Skip header and navigation

Refine By

381 records – page 1 of 39.

1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
Cites: Disasters. 2000 Sep;24(3):262-7011026159
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2003 Oct-Dec;18(4):278-9015310039
Cites: Disaster Manag Response. 2005 Jan-Mar;3(1):11-615627125
Cites: Mil Med. 2007 May;172(5):471-717521092
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;23(2):144-51; discussion 152-318557294
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jun 1;152(11):733-720197507
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):9-1019557952
Cites: Science. 2010 Feb 5;327(5966):638-920133550
Cites: Nature. 2010 Feb 18;463(7283):878-920164905
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Mar 18;362(11):e3820200362
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):3-819557951
PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accident and disaster training of media personnel in hospital environment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192354
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 31;98(44):4865-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2001
Author
J. Lundälv
Author Affiliation
Akut- och katastrofmedicinskt centrum (AKMC), Olycksanalysgruppen, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 31;98(44):4865-6
Date
Oct-31-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Crisis Intervention
Disaster planning
Disasters
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Journalism, Medical
Mass Media
Photography
Sweden
PubMed ID
11729801 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounting for vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage in pandemic critical care triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96997
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Critical Care
Cultural Characteristics
Disaster Planning - trends
Disease Outbreaks
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - ethnology - mortality - virology
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Social Class
Triage - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In a pandemic situation, resources in intensive care units may be stretched to the breaking point, and critical care triage may become necessary. In such a situation, I argue that a patient's combined vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage should be a justification for giving that patient some priority for critical care. In this article I present an example of a critical care triage protocol that recognizes the moral relevance of vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage, from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
20465071 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acting at a disaster site: views expressed by Swedish nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73369
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Apr;18(4):613-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
B O Suserud
Author Affiliation
Boras College of Health and Caring Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Apr;18(4):613-20
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum
Disaster Planning - organization & administration - standards
Education, Nursing - methods - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Job Description
Middle Aged
Nursing Education Research
Patient care team
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
There is a common interest in Swedish society in preparing nurses well for disasters. A special course in the basic nurse education programme is devoted to disaster nursing. The aim of this study is to investigate nursing students' knowledge and views of their own action at the disaster site, both in their professional role and as private persons. The present study is a descriptive one based on the students' written answers. The result shows that the students emphasize contacting the overall disaster officer, surveying the situation and carrying out basic life-saving measures in Sweden known as the ABCs. They also stress the importance of staying calm and, to a lesser extent, seeing to the needs of the mentally shocked. Thus the nursing students seem to regard treatment of physical injuries as most important in the disaster situation.
PubMed ID
8496509 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing the burden of post-conflict surgical disease - strategies from the North Caucasus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135930
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karsten Lunze
Fatima I Lunze
Author Affiliation
Preventive Medicine, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. karsten.lunze@post.harvard.edu
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Blast Injuries - complications - psychology - surgery
Capacity Building - methods
Child
Disaster Planning - methods - standards
Ear, Middle - injuries - surgery
Explosions
General Surgery - manpower
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
International Cooperation
Needs Assessment
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prisoners - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Schools
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Terrorism
War
Abstract
The 2004 terror attack on a school in Beslan, North Caucasus, with more than 1300 children and their families taken hostage and 334 people killed, ended after extreme violence. Following the disaster, many survivors with blast ear injuries developed complications because no microsurgery services were available in the region. Here, we present our strategies in North Ossetia to strengthen subspecialty surgical care in a region of instable security conditions. Disaster modifies disease burden in an environment of conflict-related health-care limitations. We built on available secondary care and partnered international with local stakeholders to reach and treat victims of a humanitarian disaster. A strategy of mutual commitment resulted in treatment of all consenting Beslan victims with blast trauma sequelae and of non disaster-related patients. Credible, sustained partnerships and needs assessments beyond the immediate phases after a disaster are essential to facilitate a meaningful transition from humanitarian aid to capacity building exceeding existing insufficient standards. Psychosocial impacts of disaster might constitute a barrier to care and need to be assessed when responding to the burden of surgical disease in conflict or post-conflict settings. Involving local citizen groups in the planning process can be useful to identify and access vulnerable populations. Integration of our strategy into broader efforts might strengthen the local health system through management and leadership.
PubMed ID
21432701 View in PubMed
Less detail

After the flood: surviving Hurricane Juan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173389
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2005 Jun;23(2):6, 8-10, 35-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Cynthia Fulmore
Sunny Russell
Author Affiliation
Victoria General Site, QEII Health Sciences Center, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2005 Jun;23(2):6, 8-10, 35-6
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disasters
Health Facility Merger - organization & administration
Humans
Multi-Institutional Systems - organization & administration
Nova Scotia
Abstract
Capital Health is the largest integrated academic health district in Atlantic Canada. It provides tertiary health services to Atlantic Canadians and to 40 per cent of Nova Scotia's population. Capital Health consists of nine facilities, one of which is the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre. The QEII is the largest adult academic health centre in Atlantic Canada, occupying 10 buildings on two sites. It employs 8500 staff and has 1075 beds. The QEII was created in 1996 with the merger of the Victoria General (VG), Halifax Infirmary (HI), Abbie J. Lane Memorial, Camp Hill Veterans' Memorial, Nova Scotia Rehabilitation Centre and the Nova Scotia Cancer Centre. There are 33 operating rooms at the HI and VG sites; together about 29,000 operations are performed there each year. The two hospitals are located about five city blocks away from each other. This article discusses how the two facilities coped after the devastation of Hurricane Juan in September 2003.
PubMed ID
16092569 View in PubMed
Less detail

[After Ut√łya...Swedish disaster planning needs to be improve].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121389
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Jul 18-Aug 8;109(29-31):1339
Publication Type
Article
Author
Louis Riddez
Per Ortenwall
Author Affiliation
Gastrocentrum kirurgi, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Solna. louis.riddez@karolinska.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Jul 18-Aug 8;109(29-31):1339
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bombs
Centralized Hospital Services - organization & administration - standards
Disaster Planning - organization & administration - standards
Disasters
Firearms
Humans
Norway
Sweden
Terrorism
Triage - organization & administration - standards
PubMed ID
22913113 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Air crash on Svalbard. An effective disaster planning at a Norwegian hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209285
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Feb 12;94(7):508-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-1997
Author
T. Ivert
J. Due
Author Affiliation
Thoraxkirurgiska Kliniken, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Feb 12;94(7):508-9
Date
Feb-12-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Aircraft
Disaster planning
Humans
Norway
Svalbard
PubMed ID
9064453 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambulance responses at a disaster site.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190830
Source
Emerg Nurse. 2002 Mar;9(10):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Bjorn-Ove Suserud
Author Affiliation
Borås University College, School of Health Sciences, Borås, Sweden. bjornove.suserud@hb.se
Source
Emerg Nurse. 2002 Mar;9(10):22-7
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances
Disaster planning
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Humans
Leadership
Nurse's Role
Nursing, Team
Sweden
Time Factors
PubMed ID
11917617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of collaboration in crisis management: Swedish study report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124284
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Apr;27(2):190-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Per Kulling
Author Affiliation
The Royal Swedish Academy of War Sciences, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden. per.kulling@hotmail.com
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012 Apr;27(2):190-3
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Disaster planning
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
This report is a summary of a study 1 conducted at the Royal Swedish Academy of War Sciences to evaluate collaboration during crisis management. The study includes relevant legal and regulatory dynamics, as well as conclusions and recommendations. Rules and regulations of international interest are presented in the Appendix. References are limited to those of international interest.
PubMed ID
22595750 View in PubMed
Less detail

381 records – page 1 of 39.