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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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Acting at a disaster site: views expressed by Swedish nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73369
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Apr;18(4):613-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
B O Suserud
Author Affiliation
Boras College of Health and Caring Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Apr;18(4):613-20
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum
Disaster Planning - organization & administration - standards
Education, Nursing - methods - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Job Description
Middle Aged
Nursing Education Research
Patient care team
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
There is a common interest in Swedish society in preparing nurses well for disasters. A special course in the basic nurse education programme is devoted to disaster nursing. The aim of this study is to investigate nursing students' knowledge and views of their own action at the disaster site, both in their professional role and as private persons. The present study is a descriptive one based on the students' written answers. The result shows that the students emphasize contacting the overall disaster officer, surveying the situation and carrying out basic life-saving measures in Sweden known as the ABCs. They also stress the importance of staying calm and, to a lesser extent, seeing to the needs of the mentally shocked. Thus the nursing students seem to regard treatment of physical injuries as most important in the disaster situation.
PubMed ID
8496509 View in PubMed
Less detail

After the flood: surviving Hurricane Juan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173389
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2005 Jun;23(2):6, 8-10, 35-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Cynthia Fulmore
Sunny Russell
Author Affiliation
Victoria General Site, QEII Health Sciences Center, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2005 Jun;23(2):6, 8-10, 35-6
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disasters
Health Facility Merger - organization & administration
Humans
Multi-Institutional Systems - organization & administration
Nova Scotia
Abstract
Capital Health is the largest integrated academic health district in Atlantic Canada. It provides tertiary health services to Atlantic Canadians and to 40 per cent of Nova Scotia's population. Capital Health consists of nine facilities, one of which is the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre. The QEII is the largest adult academic health centre in Atlantic Canada, occupying 10 buildings on two sites. It employs 8500 staff and has 1075 beds. The QEII was created in 1996 with the merger of the Victoria General (VG), Halifax Infirmary (HI), Abbie J. Lane Memorial, Camp Hill Veterans' Memorial, Nova Scotia Rehabilitation Centre and the Nova Scotia Cancer Centre. There are 33 operating rooms at the HI and VG sites; together about 29,000 operations are performed there each year. The two hospitals are located about five city blocks away from each other. This article discusses how the two facilities coped after the devastation of Hurricane Juan in September 2003.
PubMed ID
16092569 View in PubMed
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[After Ut√łya...Swedish disaster planning needs to be improve].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121389
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Jul 18-Aug 8;109(29-31):1339
Publication Type
Article
Author
Louis Riddez
Per Ortenwall
Author Affiliation
Gastrocentrum kirurgi, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Solna. louis.riddez@karolinska.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Jul 18-Aug 8;109(29-31):1339
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bombs
Centralized Hospital Services - organization & administration - standards
Disaster Planning - organization & administration - standards
Disasters
Firearms
Humans
Norway
Sweden
Terrorism
Triage - organization & administration - standards
PubMed ID
22913113 View in PubMed
Less detail

Applying the lessons of SARS to pandemic influenza: an evidence-based approach to mitigating the stress experienced by healthcare workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153106
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Nov-Dec;99(6):486-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert G Maunder
Molyn Leszcz
Diane Savage
Mary Anne Adam
Nathalie Peladeau
Donna Romano
Marci Rose
Bernard Schulman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. rmaunder@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Nov-Dec;99(6):486-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disease Outbreaks
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - therapy
Occupational Health
Ontario - epidemiology
Organizational Culture
Personnel Administration, Hospital - methods
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Resilience, Psychological
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - therapy
Social Justice
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
We describe an evidence-based approach to enhancing the resilience of healthcare workers in preparation for an influenza pandemic, based on evidence about the stress associated with working in healthcare during the SARS outbreak. SARS was associated with significant long-term stress in healthcare workers, but not with increased mental illness. Reducing pandemic-related stress may best be accomplished through interventions designed to enhance resilience in psychologically healthy people. Applicable models to improve adaptation in individuals include Folkman and Greer's framework for stress appraisal and coping along with psychological first aid. Resilience is supported at an organizational level by effective training and support, development of material and relational reserves, effective leadership, the effects of the characteristics of "magnet hospitals," and a culture of organizational justice. Evidence supports the goal of developing and maintaining an organizational culture of resilience in order to reduce the expected stress of an influenza pandemic on healthcare workers. This recommendation goes well beyond the provision of adequate training and counseling. Although the severity of a pandemic is unpredictable, this effort is not likely to be wasted because it will also support the health of both patients and staff in normal times.
PubMed ID
19149392 View in PubMed
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Are we ready? Evidence of support mechanisms for Canadian health care workers in multi-jurisdictional emergency planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160462
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):358-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tracey L O'Sullivan
Carol A Amaratunga
Jill Hardt
Darcie Dow
Karen P Phillips
Wayne Corneil
Author Affiliation
Women's Health Research Unit, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):358-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Consumer Health Information
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Education, Public Health Professional
Female
Government
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Planning - organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interinstitutional Relations
Male
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control - psychology
Public Health Administration - education
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
Federal, provincial and municipal leaders in Canada have adopted a culture of preparedness with the development and update of emergency plans in anticipation of different types of disasters. As evident during the 2003 global outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), it is important to provide support for health care workers (HCWs) who are vulnerable during infectious outbreak scenarios. Here we focus on the identification and evaluation of existing support mechanisms incorporated within emergency plans across various jurisdictional levels.
Qualitative content analysis of 12 emergency plans from national, provincial and municipal levels were conducted using NVIVO software. The plans were scanned and coded according to 1) informational, 2) instrumental, and 3) emotional support mechanisms for HCWs and other first responders.
Emergency plans were comprised of a predominance of informational and instrumental supports, yet few emotional or social support mechanisms. All the plans lacked gender-based analysis of how infectious disease outbreaks impact male and female HCWs differently. Acknowledgement of the need for emotional supports was evident at higher jurisdictional levels, but recommended for implementation locally.
While support mechanisms for HCWs are included in this sample of emergency plans, content analysis revealed few emotional or social supports planned for critical personnel; particularly for those who will be required to work in extremely stressful conditions under significant personal risk. The implications of transferring responsibilities for support to local and institutional jurisdictions are discussed.
PubMed ID
17985675 View in PubMed
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[A total program of emergency measures in a hospital setting].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225732
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1991 Sep;68(6):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
M. LeBoutillier
Author Affiliation
Service hospitaliers, l'Hôpital Montfort, Ottawa.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1991 Sep;68(6):14-6
Date
Sep-1991
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Abstract
A seven-step approach to structure emergency planning has helped Montfort Hospital in Ottawa to promote prevention and achieve a higher degree of preparedness. The seven steps include: using the mission statement to form goals and objectives; creating an organizational structure to delegate responsibilities; upgrading systems to comply with existing codes and standards and to include their costs in annual budgets; compiling main, secondary and condensed emergency plan manuals for different levels of staff; planning activities to stimulate staff interest and promote the program; training staff and evaluating the process. A collective approach to emergency planning and a prepared facility should result from the implementation of a comprehensive emergency measures program.
PubMed ID
1936651 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Biological weapons and biological defence in Denmark].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172902
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Sep 5;167(36):3381-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-2005
Author
Erik Deichmann Heegaard
John-Erik Stig Hansen
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Center for Biologisk Beredskab, København S. erh@ssi.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Sep 5;167(36):3381-4
Date
Sep-5-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Warfare - prevention & control
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Chemical Warfare - prevention & control
Denmark
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
European Union
Humans
Abstract
Biological weapons have been known for centuries, and since World War II, offensive programs have accelerated the development of these weapons considerably. The anthrax attacks in the fall 2001 and speculations regarding the research and development of Iraqi bioweapons have been causes for concern. The effect of biological weapons may be overwhelming, in particular when one is dealing with a contagious agent. The National Centre for Biological Defence provides a preparedness capability through evidence-based research and practical operational capabilities.
PubMed ID
16159486 View in PubMed
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123 records – page 1 of 13.