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Adults with congenital limb deficiency in Norway: demographic and clinical features, pain and the use of health care and welfare services. A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274507
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(22):2076-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Heidi Johansen
Kristin Østlie
Liv Øinæs Andersen
Svend Rand-Hendriksen
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(22):2076-82
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Chronic Pain - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Employment
Female
Humans
Limb Deformities, Congenital - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain Measurement
Self-Help Devices - utilization
Social Welfare
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vocational Guidance
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe an adult population with congenital limb deficiency (CLD) recruited through the National Resource Centre for Rare Disorders (TRS) in Norway: (1) demographic factors, (2) clinical features, (3) pain and (4) use of health care and welfare services.
Cross-sectional study. In 2012, a postal questionnaire was sent to 186 eligible persons with CLD, age 20 years and older.
Ninety-seven respondents, median-age 39 years (range: 20-82); 71% were women. The population was divided into two subgroups: (1) unilateral upper-limb deficiency (UULD) n = 77, (2) multiple and/or lower-limb deficiency (MLD/LLD). About 40% worked full-time, 18% received disability pensions and 64% reported chronic pain, mostly bilateral pain. Grip-improving devices were used more often than prostheses; 23% were previous prosthesis users. Use of health care and welfare services are described. No significant differences were found between the subgroups regarding pain or employment status.
Persons with CLD reported increased prevalence of chronic pain, mostly bilateral, and increased prevalence of early retirement. A greater focus on the benefits of the use of assistive devices, the consequences of overuse and vocational guidance may moderate pain and prevent early retirement. Further studies of more representative samples should be conducted to confirm our findings.
Most adults with congenital limb deficiency (CLD) live ordinary lives and experience normal life events. However, several report chronic pain and retire before normal retirement age. In spite of free and accessible prosthetic services, a large fraction chooses not to use prosthesis, more use grip-improving devices for specific activities. These preferences should be acknowledged by rehabilitation specialists. Focus on individually adapted environments, more information about the consequences of overuse, and vocational guidance may moderate pain and prevent early retirement.
PubMed ID
25583386 View in PubMed
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Aging, spinal cord injury, and quality of life: structural relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184088
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Aug;84(8):1137-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Mary Ann McColl
Robert Arnold
Susan Charlifue
Clive Glass
Gordana Savic
Hans Frankel
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. mccollm@post.queensu.ca
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Aug;84(8):1137-44
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Colorado - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To quantify relationships among 3 sets of factors: demographic factors, health and disability factors, and quality of life (QOL).
Part of a program of longitudinal research on aging and spinal cord injury (SCI) involving 3 populations: American, British, and Canadian. The present analysis uses data from the 1999 interval.
The Canadian sample was derived from the member database of the Ontario and Manitoba divisions of the Canadian Paraplegic Association. The British sample was recruited from a national and a regional SCI center in England. The American sample was recruited through a hospital in Colorado.
A sample of 352 participants was assembled from 4 large, well-established databases. The sample included individuals who had incurred an SCI at least 20 years earlier, were admitted to rehabilitation within 1 year of injury, and were between the ages of 15 and 55 at the time of injury.
Not applicable.
A combination of self-completed questionnaires and interviews. Data included demographics, injury-related variables, health and disability-related factors, QOL, and perceptions about aging.
Using linear structural relationships modeling, we found that QOL was affected both directly and indirectly by age, health and disability problems, and perceptions of aging. Two surprising findings were as follows: those who experienced fewer disability-related problems were more likely to report a qualitative disadvantage in aging, and the younger members of the sample were more likely to report fatigue.
Fatigue is a concern because of the relationship of fatigue with perceived temporal disadvantage in aging, health problems, and disability problems. This finding highlights the need for clinical vigilance among those just beginning to experience the effects of aging.
PubMed ID
12917851 View in PubMed
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Associations between disability and employment 1 year after traumatic brain injury in a working age population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126623
Source
Brain Inj. 2012;26(3):261-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Nada Andelic
Lillian Flores Stevens
Solrun Sigurdardottir
Juan Carlos Arango-Lasprilla
Cecilie Roe
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Oslo, Norway. nadand@ous-hf.no
Source
Brain Inj. 2012;26(3):261-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Employment
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Probability
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Social Adjustment
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate associations between disability and employment 1 year after traumatic brain injury (TBI) using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a conceptual model.
A prospective study including 93 patients with moderate-to-severe TBI (aged 16-55 year). Disability components of the ICF model (impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions) and personal factors (age, gender, pre-injury employment status) were used as independent variables. The outcome measure was employment at 1 year post-injury categorized into unemployed and employed groups.
Personal factors, impairments (brain injury severity, overall trauma severity and number of impaired body functions) and activity limitations (motor and cognitive abilities) accounted for 57% of the variance in employment outcome. Multivariate analyses showed that the probabilities of being employed 1 year post-injury were 95% lower for patients who were unemployed pre-injury (OR?=?0.05), 74% lower for those with more severe brain injury (OR?=?0.26) and 82% lower for those with more cognitive limitations (OR?=?0.18).
Rehabilitation professionals should take into account the importance of the ICF model when planning vocational rehabilitation interventions for individuals with TBI and focus on targeting modifiable aspects related to employment outcome, such as the individual's cognitive ability.
PubMed ID
22372413 View in PubMed
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Computer-based assistive technology device for use by children with physical disabilities: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124181
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2012 Jul;7(4):287-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Helene Lidström
Lena Almqvist
Helena Hemmingsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. helene.lidstrom@ki.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2012 Jul;7(4):287-93
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Computers - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Patient satisfaction
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Self-Help Devices - utilization
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Technology - instrumentation
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence of children with physical disabilities who used a computer-based ATD, and to examine characteristics differences in children and youths who do or do not use computer-based ATDs, as well as, investigate differences that might influence the satisfaction of those two groups of children and youths when computers are being used for in-school and outside school activities.
A cross-sectional survey about computer-based activities in and outside school (n = 287) and group comparisons.
The prevalence of using computer-based ATDs was about 44 % (n = 127) of the children in this sample. These children were less satisfied with their computer use in education and outside school activities than the children who did not use an ATD.
Improved coordination of the usage of computer-based ATDs in school and in the home, including service and support, could increase the opportunities for children with physical disabilities who use computer-based ATDs to perform the computer activities they want, need and are expected to do in school and outside school.
PubMed ID
22612787 View in PubMed
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The cost of the Swedish handicap service system. Implications for technology assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216377
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):269-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
D. Jonsson
U. Hass
J. Persson
Author Affiliation
University of Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):269-75
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Costs and Cost Analysis
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Rehabilitation - economics - statistics & numerical data
State Medicine - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Technology Assessment, Biomedical - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The total cost of the Swedish handicap system is estimated at US $10.7 billion for 1989. The cost is distributed across different authorities with separate legal and financial responsibility. The concept of technology must be extended to include consideration of both the resources spent and benefits gained in the public sector and the magnitude and distribution of transfer payments from social insurance to fulfill its function in handicap policy decision making.
PubMed ID
7790170 View in PubMed
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Discrimination and other barriers to employment for teens and young adults with disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139400
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(15-16):1340-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sally Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. slindsay@hollandbloorview.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(15-16):1340-50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Employment, Supported
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Job Application
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Having a disability is a barrier to securing and maintaining employment. Most research has focussed on employment barriers among adults, while very little is known about young people's experience finding paid work.
Young people aged 15-24 were selected from the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to explore the barriers and discrimination they experienced in seeking employment (n?=?1898).
Our findings show that teens and young adults with disabilities encountered several barriers and discrimination in seeking paid employment. The types of barriers that these young people encountered varied by age and type of disability. There were fewer yet different types of barriers to working that were encountered between the two age groups (teens and young adults). Several socio-demographic factors also influenced barriers to working. Severity of disability, type and duration of disability, level of education, gender, low income, geographic location and the number of people living in the household all influenced the kind of barriers and work discrimination for these young people.
Rehabilitation and life skills counsellors need to pay particular attention to age, type of disability and socio-demographic factors of teens and young adults who may need extra help in gaining employment.
PubMed ID
21067349 View in PubMed
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Efficacy of a multicomponent support programme for the caregivers of disabled persons: a randomised controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113283
Source
Z Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Jul;46(5):449-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
O-P Ryynänen
P. Nousiainen
E J O Soini
S. Tuominen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland. olli-pekka.ryynanen@kuh.fi
Source
Z Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Jul;46(5):449-55
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - mortality - rehabilitation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Social Support
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The goal of the present work was to measure the efficacy of a multicomponent programme designed to provide tailored support for the caregivers of disabled persons.
A total of 135 caregivers-care receiver dyads were randomly divided into an intervention group (n = 66) and a control group (n = 69). One-third of the care receivers were demented, and two-thirds had other diseases.
Health centres (publicly funded primary health care systems) in 8 rural and urban communities in southeast Finland.
The multicomponent support programme for the caregivers consisted of a 2-week rehabilitation period. The control group received standard care.
Continuation of the caregiver and care receiver relationship, care receiver mortality at the 2-year follow-up as well as the health-related quality of life (15D scale) and Zung's depression scale of the caregiver at the 1-year follow-up were evaluated.
At the 2-year follow-up, the caregiver-care receiver relationship was terminated for any reason in 11 cases (17%) in the intervention group, and in 25 cases (36%) in the control group. After adjusting, the primary outcome (i.e., termination of care giving for any reason) indicated statistical significance (p = 0.04) with a hazard rate of 1.83 (95% confidence interval 1.03-3.29). With a similar adjustment, the difference in mortality and placement to institutional care between the two groups demonstrated a trend towards statistical significance. The caregivers' health, as related to quality of life and depressive symptoms, remained unchanged in both groups at the 1-year follow-up.
These results indicate that a tailored support programme for caregivers may help the caregiver to continue the caregiver-care receiver relationship and delay institutionalization.
PubMed ID
23743879 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of stroke-related disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200749
Source
Clin Geriatr Med. 1999 Nov;15(4):785-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
H S Jørgensen
H. Nakayama
P M Pedersen
L. Kammersgaard
H O Raaschou
T S Olsen
Author Affiliation
Consultant, Department of Neurology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin Geriatr Med. 1999 Nov;15(4):785-99
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Acute Disease
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Neurologic Examination
Nursing Homes
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Stroke - epidemiology - physiopathology - rehabilitation - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This article describes basic characteristics and primary outcomes of unselected patients with stroke. These patients were part of the Copenhagen Stroke Study, a prospective, consecutive, and community-based study of 1197 acute stroke patients. The setting and care was multidisciplinary and all treatment was performed within the dedicated stroke unit. Neurologic impairment was measured at admission, weekly throughout the hospital stay, and again at the 6-month follow up. Basic activities of daily living, as measured by the Barthel Index, were assessed within the first week of admission, weekly throughout the hospital stay, and again after 6 months. Upon completion of the in-hospital rehabilitation, which averaged 37 days, two-thirds of surviving patients were discharged to their homes, with another 15% being discharged to a nursing home. Only 4% of the patients with very severe strokes reached independent function, as compared with 13% of patients with severe stroke, 37% of patients with moderate stroke, and 68% of patients with mild stroke.
PubMed ID
10499935 View in PubMed
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Functioning and disability in adults with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137712
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(19-20):1826-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marie Kierkegaard
Karin Harms-Ringdahl
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Anna Tollbäck
Author Affiliation
Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. marie.kierkegaard@karolinska.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(19-20):1826-36
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Muscles - physiopathology
Myotonic Dystrophy - classification - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Participation
Sweden
Walking - physiology
Abstract
To provide a comprehensive description of functioning and disability with regard to stages of disease progression in adults with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Further to explore associations of measures of manual dexterity and of walking capacity with measures of activities of daily living (ADL) and participation in social and lifestyle activities.
Seventy persons with DM1 underwent examinations, tests and answered questionnaires. Stages of disease progression were based on the muscular impairment rating scale.
Overweight, cardiac dysfunctions, respiratory restrictions, fatigue and/or low physical activity levels were found in approximately 40% of those with DM1. Over 75% had muscle impairments, and activity limitations in manual dexterity and walking. Dependence in personal and instrumental ADL was found in 16% and 39%, respectively, and participation restrictions in social and lifestyle activities in 52%. The presence of concurrent body-function impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions was high. Significant differences were found in muscle impairment, manual dexterity, mobility, ADL and social and lifestyle activities with regard to disease progression. Cut-off values in measures of manual dexterity and walking capacity associated to functioning are proposed.
This information can be used for developing clinical practise and for health promotion for persons with DM1.
PubMed ID
21254917 View in PubMed
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Has increased focus on vocational rehabilitation led to an increase in young employees' return to work after work-related disorders?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200898
Source
Scand J Public Health. 1999 Sep;27(3):220-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
C. Ahlgren
A. Hammarström
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 1999 Sep;27(3):220-7
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Occupational Diseases - rehabilitation
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Registries
Rehabilitation, Vocational - methods
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine whether the large investments in vocational rehabilitation made in Sweden during the 1990s had improved the level of return to work for young employees and to study the factors predicting return to work. The study population comprised all employees under 30 years of age whose reports on work-related disorders were under consideration at regional social insurance offices in Västerbotten county in 1990 and 1994 (n = 266). Between these years, increased efforts were made by the Swedish government to improve vocational rehabilitation. Data was collected from the register and by means of questionnaires. It was found that employees with musculoskeletal disorders were more likely to return to work during periods of intensive vocational rehabilitation. No increase in the level of return to work was apparent if all disorders were considered. Men showed a higher level of return to work than women, although women were better educated.
PubMed ID
10482082 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.