Skip header and navigation

Refine By

180 records – page 1 of 18.

The 'ability' paradigm in vocational rehabilitation: challenges in an Ontario injured worker retraining program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131610
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):105-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
E. MacEachen
A. Kosny
S. Ferrier
K. Lippel
C. Neilson
R L Franche
D. Pugliese
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. emaceachen@iwh.on.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):105-17
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics - methods
Workers' Compensation - organization & administration
Abstract
In recent years, a focus on workers' ability, rather than impairment, has guided disability management services. However, a challenge with the notion of 'ability' is identification of the border between ability and inability. This article considers this gray zone of disability management in the case of a workers' compensation vocational retraining program for injured workers in Ontario.
In-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of 71 participants who were directly involved with the vocational retraining process. Workers in the program had on average incurred injury 3 years earlier. Procedural and legal documents were also analyzed. Principles of grounded theory and discourse analysis guided the data gathering and analysis.
A program focus on worker abilities did not allow for consideration of unresolved medical problems. Concepts such as maximum medical rehabilitation distracted attention from workers' ongoing chronic and unstable health situations, and incentive levers to employers directed some of the least capable workers into the program. As well, communication pathways for discussing health problems were limited by rules and provider reluctance to reveal problems. Therefore, workers completing the program were deemed 'employable', while ongoing and problematic health conditions preventing employment remained relatively uncharted and invisible.
This study reinforces how the shift in disability management paradigm to a focus on ability and return to work requires consideration of environmental conditions, including policies and programs and implementation. A focus on the environment in which worker ability can be enacted might be as important as a focus on improving individual worker characteristics.
PubMed ID
21894535 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accommodation needs and student-environment fit in upper secondary schools for students with severe physical disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197755
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2000 Jun;67(3):162-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
H. Hemmingsson
L. Borell
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Institution of Clinical Neuroscience, Occupational Therapy and Elderly Care Research, Stockholm, Sweden. Helena.Hemmingsson@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2000 Jun;67(3):162-72
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Needs Assessment
Occupational therapy
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify, from the personal perspective of students with disability, their needs for physical and social accommodations in upper secondary schools specially adapted for students with severe physical disabilities. The study also aimed to identify those areas of student-environment fit which were most often achieved. Forty-eight students in four schools in Sweden were assessed by occupational therapists using the School Setting Interview. Forty-seven students reported needs for accommodations in the school setting. The study indicates that schools generally were able to meet the students' accommodation needs in the physical environment. The schools also met students' accommodation needs for field trips, sport activities and assistance. Student-environment fit in occupations requiring reading, remembering and speaking was unsatisfactory. Accommodations on a general, group and individual level are highlighted and discussed. The study recommends that occupational therapists become more involved and offer society their expertise in barrier removal to a greater extent.
PubMed ID
10914479 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activity of military medical service in developing of rehabilitation system of invalids on account of military actions and battle trauma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161057
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2007 Jul;328(7):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007

Adaptation of a seated postural control measure for adult wheelchair users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173363
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Aug 19;27(16):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-2005
Author
Brigitte Gagnon
Claude Vincent
Luc Noreau
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada. claude.vincent@rea.ulaval.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Aug 19;27(16):951-9
Date
Aug-19-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Biomechanical Phenomena
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Equipment Design - standards
Humans
Mechanics
Posture - physiology
Quality of Life
Quebec
Wheelchairs - standards
Abstract
Clinical measures of seated postural control in adults are not standardized and most are derived from in-house tools. The purpose of this study is to adapt a pediatric instrument to evaluate seated postural control in adult wheelchair users.
The new instrument is called the Seated Postural Control Measure for Adults (SPCMA) 1.0. Five preliminary versions were pretested with some 20 adults by two raters and a group of experts.
This instrument comprises three sections: Section 1, level of sitting scale for adults (1 item, 7-point ordinal scale); Section 2, static postural alignment (22 items, 7-point ordinal scale); and Section 3, postural alignment after a dynamic activity, propulsion of the wheelchair on flat terrain and an incline (22 items, 7-point ordinal scale).
The SPCMA for Adults 1.0 improves the quality and uniformity of evaluations done by different raters, which facilitates more rigorous follow-up of clients over time, communication between professionals, and objective verification of the attainment of intervention objectives.
PubMed ID
16096248 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapting work sites for disabled persons using advanced technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216378
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):235-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
T. Malmsborg
Author Affiliation
TeleNova, Stockholm.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):235-44
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Systems
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Employment, Supported
Holistic Health
Humans
Models, organizational
Patient care team
Rehabilitation, Vocational - instrumentation - methods
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Vocational Guidance
Workplace
Abstract
This paper describes the technical approach in the TUFFA (Technology Procurement for Disabled in Working Life) project and a model for cooperating areas of competence based on a holistic view of the individual's abilities, the environmental conditions at the work site, and technical solutions.
PubMed ID
7790167 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adding quality to day centre activities for people with psychiatric disabilities: Staff perceptions of an intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273214
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016;23(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Mona Eklund
Christel Leufstadius
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016;23(1):13-22
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Day Care Centers - organization & administration - standards
Community Mental Health Centers - organization & administration
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Focus Groups
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Narration
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Quality Improvement
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate an intervention aimed at enriching day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities by exploring staff experiences from developing and implementing the intervention.
Each staff group developed a tailor-made intervention plan, following a manual, for how to enrich the day centre. They received supervision and support from the research team. The study was based on focus-group interviews with a total of 13 staff members at four day centres. Narrative analysis with a thematic approach was used. A first round resulted in one narrative per centre. These centre-specific narratives were then integrated into a common narrative that covered all the data.
A core theme emerged: User involvement permeated the implementation process and created empowerment. It embraced four themes forming a timeline: "Mix of excitement, worries and hope", "Confirmation and development through dialogue, feedback and guidance", "The art of integrating new activities and strategies with the old", and "Empowerment-engendered future aspirations".
The users' involvement and empowerment were central for the staff in accomplishing the desired changes in services, as were their own reflections and learning. A possible factor that may have contributed to the positive outcomes was that those who were central in developing the plan were the same as those who implemented it.
PubMed ID
26206294 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ADL ability and use of technical aids in persons with late effects of polio.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7382
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 2002 Jul-Aug;56(4):457-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Catarina Kling
Anders Persson
Ann Gardulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. vardutvecklingsavdelningen@nursres.hs.sll.se
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 2002 Jul-Aug;56(4):457-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Devices - utilization
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe functional performance in activities of daily living (ADL) and the use of technical aids among persons with late effects of polio. METHOD: Abilities in ADL of 150 participants 20 to 82 years of age were assessed with the Sunnaas Index of ADL, and the participants' use of technical aids was recorded. RESULTS: The activities in which most participants were independent were eating, daily hygiene, and communication. Many needed technical aids, adaptation of their homes, or both to perform mobility-related activities and to dress or undress, take a bath or shower, cook, or manage toilet visits. In total, 86 (57%) used mobility aids such as canes, crutches, and walkers. Thirty-one (21%) used wheelchairs within or outside the home. Bath and shower aids were the most commonly used technical aids other than mobility aids. The activity where most participants depended on others was housework. CONCLUSION: In spite of their disabilities, most participants performed well in many ADL, functioning independently by using technical aids and by living in an adapted environment.
PubMed ID
12125836 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult Scandinavians' use of powered scooters: user satisfaction, frequency of use, and prediction of daily use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295765
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2018 04; 13(3):212-219
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Terje Sund
Åse Brandt
Author Affiliation
a Department of Assistive Technology , The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service , Oslo , Norway.
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2018 04; 13(3):212-219
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Electric Power Supplies
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Reproducibility of Results
Wheelchairs
Abstract
To investigate user satisfaction with characteristics of powered scooters (scooters), frequency of use, and factors predicting daily scooter use.
Cross-sectional.
Adult scooter users (n?=?59) in Denmark and Norway, mean age 74.5 (standard deviation 12.3) years.
Structured face-to-face interviews. The NOMO 1.0, the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive devices (QUEST 2.0), and a study specific instrument were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics were applied, and regression analyzes were used to investigate predictors for daily scooter use. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) served as a framework for classifying variables and guiding the investigation.
Satisfaction with the scooter characteristics was high with most participants being very satisfied or quite satisfied (66.1-91.5%). Most scooters were used daily (36.2%) or several times a week (50.0%). User satisfaction with safety of the scooter [odds ratio (OR)?=?11.76, confidence interval (CI)?=?1.70-81.28] and reduced balance (OR?=?5.63, CI?=?0.90-35.39) increased the likelihood of daily use, while reduced function in back and/or legs (OR?=?.04, CI?=?0.00-0.75), tiredness (OR?=?.06, CI?=?0.01-0.51), and increased age (OR?=?.93, CI?=?0.87-1.00) reduced the likelihood of daily use. 52.8% of the variance was explained by these variables.
User satisfaction was high, and most scooters were used frequently. User satisfaction with safety, specific functional limitations and age were predictors for daily scooter use. Implications for Rehabilitation Scooters seem to be a beneficial intervention for people with mobility impairment: user satisfaction and frequency of use are high. Users' subjective feeling of safety should be secured in the service delivery process in order to support safe and frequent scooter use. Training of scooter skills should be considered in the service delivery process.
PubMed ID
28366104 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adults with congenital limb deficiency in Norway: demographic and clinical features, pain and the use of health care and welfare services. A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274507
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(22):2076-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Heidi Johansen
Kristin Østlie
Liv Øinæs Andersen
Svend Rand-Hendriksen
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(22):2076-82
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Chronic Pain - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Employment
Female
Humans
Limb Deformities, Congenital - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain Measurement
Self-Help Devices - utilization
Social Welfare
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vocational Guidance
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe an adult population with congenital limb deficiency (CLD) recruited through the National Resource Centre for Rare Disorders (TRS) in Norway: (1) demographic factors, (2) clinical features, (3) pain and (4) use of health care and welfare services.
Cross-sectional study. In 2012, a postal questionnaire was sent to 186 eligible persons with CLD, age 20 years and older.
Ninety-seven respondents, median-age 39 years (range: 20-82); 71% were women. The population was divided into two subgroups: (1) unilateral upper-limb deficiency (UULD) n = 77, (2) multiple and/or lower-limb deficiency (MLD/LLD). About 40% worked full-time, 18% received disability pensions and 64% reported chronic pain, mostly bilateral pain. Grip-improving devices were used more often than prostheses; 23% were previous prosthesis users. Use of health care and welfare services are described. No significant differences were found between the subgroups regarding pain or employment status.
Persons with CLD reported increased prevalence of chronic pain, mostly bilateral, and increased prevalence of early retirement. A greater focus on the benefits of the use of assistive devices, the consequences of overuse and vocational guidance may moderate pain and prevent early retirement. Further studies of more representative samples should be conducted to confirm our findings.
Most adults with congenital limb deficiency (CLD) live ordinary lives and experience normal life events. However, several report chronic pain and retire before normal retirement age. In spite of free and accessible prosthetic services, a large fraction chooses not to use prosthesis, more use grip-improving devices for specific activities. These preferences should be acknowledged by rehabilitation specialists. Focus on individually adapted environments, more information about the consequences of overuse, and vocational guidance may moderate pain and prevent early retirement.
PubMed ID
25583386 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aging, disability, and frailty: implications for universal design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82456
Source
J Physiol Anthropol. 2006 Jan;25(1):113-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Crews Douglas E
Zavotka Susan
Author Affiliation
Departments of Anthropology and Consumer Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43201, USA. Crews.8@osu.edu
Source
J Physiol Anthropol. 2006 Jan;25(1):113-8
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropology, Physical - methods
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Environment Design - trends
Forecasting
Frail Elderly
Humans
Needs Assessment
World Health
Abstract
Throughout the world all populations are seeing burgeoning numbers of "elders", defined as persons aged 65 year and older. In many countries, including Japan, the United States, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom, those aged over 65 are at or approaching 15% of the population. As their numbers have increased, so have their health care expenses, leading to extensive research on the health, well being, and life expectancy of these increasingly older elders. Today this group is further sub-divided: the young-old ages 65-74, the old-old ages 75-84, and the oldest-old ages 85+, for both health care and research purposes. However broad variation still characterizes even these groupings. Rates of frailty and disability increase with increasing age among these elders. For example, inabilities to complete at least one activity of daily living increased from about 5-7% at ages 65-69 years to about 28-36% at ages 85+ in 1987. Death rates continue to decline at all ages past 50 years and rates of disability seem to be doing the same. For the foreseeable future, we may expect increasing numbers of older, frail elders than in previous decades. Thus, people are not only living longer, they generally are healthier at advanced ages than were previous cohorts, thus "old age" disabilities of the 20th century will be put off to even older ages during the 21st century. As yet there is no clear way to assess senescent changes in humans, although activities of daily living, allostatic load, and frailty indices have all been suggested. One future need is greater development and use of universal and accessible design in all aspects of the built environment.
PubMed ID
16617216 View in PubMed
Less detail

180 records – page 1 of 18.